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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



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Printed by 

Flanigan-Pearson Company (Inc.) 

Champaign, Illinois 



Copyright 1915 
Roger 1!. Uronson 
Sidney D. Kirkpatric k 




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IllUnots 



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JbMration 



jpoiuerful, toonberhil, splcnbib is out- 
state — Illinois. I^cr prairies arc a 
great, arecn aarbcu, anb cum nnber b,er 
earth, lies treasure. 

Wljen lias tl^ere been a people like 
ljer people, kulja IjaUc so swiftly anb so 
toell built miolitu cities? ^ut in tlje 
power to 0iue a oreat man birtli anb 
to rear Ijim up to greatness, lies % 
real test of a state; anb (Srant anb 
lo^an anb Lincoln are Ijer sons, let 
not to % people, anb not to tlie lanb, 
but to tlje state—to tb,e ener-djanjjino 
anb get eternal state— to tlie ^tatc of 
Illinois, m bebicate tljis, tlje Jlllio of 
Nineteen Hunbrcb anb Sixteen. 



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Associate in |xnj}lislj 

Porn, JHcln-uary IS, 1879 
^Bicb, 3July 21, 1914 



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|gorn, October 20, 1847 
jiico, -^oiJcmbcr 13, 1914 



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"But let my due feet never fail, 
To walk thy studious cloisters pale." 



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"7/ir warlike elf much wondered at this tree 
So fair and great, that shadowed all ground.' 



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"Whoever could make tzuo blades of grass to grow upon a spot of ground where only 
one grew before, would deserve better of mankind than the whole race of politicians put 
together." 








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"■Woman: Wherever you are life shall be made a little brighter and dull tired faces 
made to smile." 

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'The wealth of Illinois is her soil, and her strength lies in its intelligent development.' 

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Let it be known that books arc best." 



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'Happy the man, whose wish and care 
A few paternal acres bound, 
Content to breathe his native air 
In his ozvn ground." 
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"What figure more immovably august 

Than that grave strength so patient and so pure.'' 



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M splash of white, a gleam of red, 
The glory of the tulip bed— 

. I fairy bower. 
. hid in the green on elm and pines 
The springtide lurks; the morning shines 

On wall and lower." 





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■O Woman— lovely woman; Nature made thee 
To temper man: zee had been brutes without you. 



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A democratic pathway to learning and honest labor. 




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'Es fcr war, I call it murder, - 
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I don't want to go no furder 
Than my Testyment fer that." 




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"When Time who steals our years away 

Shall steal our pleasures too 
The memories of the past will stay 
And half our joys renew.'' 



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"Where wealth and freedom reign, contentment fails 
And honour sinks where commerce long prevails." 



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Trees, towers, domes, and temples lie, 
In open cluster to the sky. 



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Thy native soil, these happy walks and shades. 



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THE UNIVERSITY 



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THE UNIVERSITY 



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THE UNIVERSITY 



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Edward F. Dunne 



Francis G. Blair 



James K. Hopkins 



MEMBERS EX OFFICIO 

The Governor of Illinois 

Hon. Edward F. Dunne Springfield 

The Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Hon. Francis G. Blair _ Springfield 

The President of the State Board of Agriculture 
I Ion. James K. Hopkins Princeton 

ELECTED MEMBERS 
(Term, 1911-1917) 

William L. Abbott Chicago 

Mary E. Busey Urbana 

Otis W. Hoit Geneseo 

(Term, 1913-1919) 

Ellen M. IIenrotin Chicago 

J o 11 n R. Trevett Champaign 

Florence E. Watson Effingham 

(Term, 191 5-192 1 ) 

Laura B. Evans Taylorville 

Robert F. Carr Chicago 

Robert R. Ward Benton 

OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

William L. Abbott, Chicago President 

Harrison E. Cunningham, Urbana Secretary 

Hazen S. Capron, Champaign Treasurer 

George E. Frazer, Urbana Comptroller 



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THE UNIVERSITY 




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Edmund Jaxes James, Ph.D., LL.D., President 

David Kixley, Ph.D., LL.D., Vice President, Dean of the Graduate School, 
Director of the Courses in Business Administration, and Professor of Eco- 
nomics 

Eugene Davenport, M.Agr., LL.D., Dean of the College of Agriculture, Director 
of Agricultural Extension Service, and Professor of Thremmatology 

Oliver Albert Harker, A.M., LL.D., Dean of the College of Law and Pro- 
fessor of Law 
Thomas Arkle Clark, B.L., Dean of Men and Professor of RJictoric 

William Freeman Myrick Goss, M.S., D.Eng., Dean of the College of Engi- 
neering, Director of the School of Railway Engineering and Administration, 
and Professor of Railway Engineering 

Kendric Charles Babcock, B.Lit., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences 

Charles Russ Richards, B.M.E., M.E.. M.M.E., Acting Dean of the College 
of Engineering and Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Frederick Brown Moorehead, A.B.. D.D.S., M.D., Dean of the College of 
Dentistry and Professor of Oral Surgery and Pathology 

Martha Jackson Kyle, A.M., Acting Dean of Women 

George Peter Dreyer, A.B., Ph.D., Junior Dean of the College of Medicine, 
Professor of Physiology and Physiological Chemistry, and Head of the 
Department of Physiology and Physiological Chemistry 

Daniel Atkinson King Steele, M.D., LL.D., Senior Dean of the College of 
Medicine. Professor of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, and Head of the De- 
partment of Surgery 



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1873-AT HORTHWL5Tf.RH 



FAVORITE. RLCRLATION 



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CLASS E S 




(&&mmmt£mmi 1914 

The Gregory Memorial exercises were the special feature of the 1914 Commencement. 
The bronze tablet which now marks the grave of the first president of the University was 
unveiled at that time. Simple but impressive services were held, commemorating the life 
and work of the University's founder. Many of the alumni who attended the University 
during Dr. Gregory's administration were present. 

The usual number of class reunions were held, and in addition, there was the alumni 
lawn festival, a new feature, which it is hoped will be repeated in future commencements. 
Representatives of every class save one in the University's history were present at the 
Gregory Reunion Convocation, where many prominent alumni united in paying tribute to the 
"Father of the University". 

The campus, always beautiful during commencement time, was at its best last year. 
The three undergraduate classes had departed for home. In their places had come troops 
of relatives and friends eager to see the commencement services. Hand shaking and well 
wishing prevailed on every side. Eight hundred and forty-three students received degrees 



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CLASSES 




at Urbana. In addition to the degrees granted to senior and to graduate students, a number 
of students in attendance during the years 1868-1892 received their belated diplomas. 

The commencement exercises proper began with the ambassador's salute of nineteen 
guns, which was fired by the battery as the procession began to form in front of the library. 
Lead by the band, the long procession then marched to the auditorium, where the address 
was delivered by Count Johann von Bernsdorff, the Imperial German Ambassador to the 
United States. When the exercises in the auditorium were completed, the new alumni, 
diplomas in hand, marched back to the front campus where President James delivered a 
short farewell address. 

To mark the conclusion of their college life at Illinois, the graduates then formed in a 
circle in front of the library, and with tear dimmed eyes sang "By thy rivers gently flowing, 
Illinois, Illinois". When the last words of the chorus had been completed the circle was 
broken up. Each graduate was claimed by his friends. Another chapter in the University's 
history had been written. L. W. K. 




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CLASS E S 






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Fj>.y/ Semester 

R. M. Husband President 

A. B. Bingham Vice-President 

G. W. Blake Secretary 

V. 1). Cylkowski Sergeant-at-Arms.. 

STAG COMMITTEE 



Second Semester 
.Benjamin Wham 
-A. B. Hammitt 
. Marjorie June 
-G. C. Klehm, Jr. 



R. C. Maley 



S. CORLY 

E. H. Pool 
R. T. Glassco 
W. C. Deiss 
O. A. Krueger 



J. A. Sackrison 
G. C. Erazer 
R. L. Strang 

L. W. RUNDLES 

W. N. Leonard 



A. S. Tarnoski 
D. W. Thatcher 
R. O. Barnes 
C. T. Terrill 
C. H. Berwald 



BREAKFAST COMMITTEE 
Ann Turlay ... ... 

J. S. Walker E. H. Morrissey H. Dubin 

Fern Loing Verna Butzer Helen Crawford 

CAP AND GOWN COMMITTEE 

C. P. Winters 

Viola Wolfe Marie Rutenber Mamie Ward 

E. S. McPherson C. L. Ritts W. W. Zieman 

CLASS DAY COMMITTEE 

A. O. Frazer 

Helen Dawson W. O. Pendarvis P. J. Sweeney 

B. H. Decker Grace LaFrenz Edna Millizen 

Ruth Young W. H. Chambers 



Chairman 
V. W. Haag 
H. C. Olseng 
L. H. Dunham 
R. E. Greenburg 



Chairman 
L. A. Husted 
Lillian Dole 
C. H. McCauley 

Chairman 

Martorie Sutcliffe 
F. W. Pusey 
A. J. Clarkson 

Chairman 
C. E. Sims 
Vera Hess 
J. P. Shields 




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HERMANN BRUNSKILL COMSTOCK CHAPMAN DOBBINS EVERHART VANSANT 

ZOLLINGER AINSWORTH HOOD BRODD HICKMAN CHARTRAND 

LAWSON WHAM LEONARD DUHADWAY DIETZER m'gAUGHEY 



SEIDENBERG 

WITH FURSLEY BROWN 



Mentor JScill (Committee 



H. F. AlNSVVORTH 

Em ma Pursley 

D. F. Com stock 
V. F. Dobbins 
Mary Lawson 
W. L. Vansant 



F. A. DuHadvvay 



P. M. EVERHART 

C. F. Hood 
Gladys Leonard 
G. O. With 
R. C. Glover 
f. E. Zollinger 



X. C. Seidenberg 
f. w. postel 
Alice Dietzer 
R. L. Hermann 
H. W. Deakman 
L. S. Brodd 



Chairman 
G. C. McGaughey 

E. R. Brunskill 
R. D. Chapman 
J. B. Chartrand 
J. F. Brown 
J. B. Hickman 



Mentor iMemoi*ial (Committee 



L. D. Knapp 



A. B. Rayburn 

W. F. Postel 

E. A. WlLLIFORD 

J. H. Rapp 
A. A. Odell 



C S. Bruner 
W. K. Norris 
J. C. Whitelaw 
F. S. Wells 
C. C. Gamble 



j. c. hostetler 
Marie Rutenber 
Alice Carter 
Beatrice Copley 
R. C. Glover 



Chairman 
C. L. Sherman 
E. F. Gehrig 
R. L. Barlow 
A. K. Fogg 



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RAYBURN 



HOSTETLER CLOVER SHERMAN RAPP 

NORRIS GAMBLE WlLLIFORD WHITELAW BRUNER GEHRIG 

BARLOW FOGG COPLEY KNAPP RUTENBER 



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Mary Olena Adams 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Tipton, Missouri 

Senior Hockey Team ; Senior Basketball Team ; 
Graduated from Forest Park University, St. 
Louis, Missouri. 



Grace Elizabeth Alexander 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Chicago 

Illiola Literary Society; Der Deutsche Verein ; 
University Choral Society. 



Alice Alexandria Allen 
; Ainswort 2N Liberal Arts and Sciences, Househol Science 

Agriculture Grecnsburg, Indiana [ rbana 

Agricultural Club; H. H. Club; Pan Hellenic Secretary of the Chapel Club; Household Sci- 

Council; Ag Dance Committee (4) ; Manager of ence Club. 
Class Baseball (4). 



Laura Ann Alband, KKT, ON 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Streator 
Illiola Literary Society. 



Harold Cornelius Albin, AZ 
Agriculture Washington, D. C 

Cosmopolitan Club. 



Otho William Allen, 4>BK 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Clinton 

Cosmopolitan Club; Le Cercle Franqais, (presi- 
dent) ; Freshman Honors ; Preliminary Honors. 



Mf.lvil Carlyle Alyea, *K2 
. Uiriculture Earlville 

University Motorcycle Club : Agronomy So- 
ciety; Class" Football ( 1) ; Military Band (3), (4I ; 



Beloit College (1) ; University of Wisconsin (2). 



3 




Always lias a Sunday dale for church. — Laura Alband. 




Law 



Benjamin Franklin Anderson, *A* William French Anderson 

Charleston Agriculture Lake rarest 

Agricultural Club; Hoof and Horn Club; Ag- 
riculturist Staff (3); Junior Prom Committee; 
Senior Hat Committee; Ag Dance Committee 
(4) ; Ag Round-up Committee (2), (4). 



Clarence Joseph Anderson 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business 
Vice President of Railway Club. 



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John Asa Andrews 
Agriculture Walnut 

Agricultural Club; Illinois Society of Agron- 



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Irving Anderson, 7 rianglcl^-,\ <$B 
Municipal and Sanitary Engineering Galcsburg Michael Louis Angarola 

Civil Engineering 1 incago 

JSeeand Mandolin Club (1), (2); Civil Engi- 
neers' Club ; Spaulding Guild. 



y Walker Whitcomb Anderson, Acanthus 

Architecture Holder 

Scarab; Class Baseball. 



Dorothy Maude Armington, SK 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Dixon 

■"II 




•Heaten and ventilating." Irving Anderson 




Della Estelle Armstrong 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Newton, Iowa 

Y. W. C. A.; Know Your City Committee (2), 
(3) ; Financial Committee (4). 



Barton Slade Austin, Jr. 
Landscape Architecture Woodstock 

Scarab ; University Society of Landscape Archi- 
tects ; Preliminary Honors. 



Lennox Francois Armstrong, X3>, 2T 
Mechanical Engineering River Forest 

Students' Branch of American Society of Me- 
chanical Engineers; Tribe of the Illirii; Varsitv 
Football (3), (4). 

Walter Clark Armstrong, 9AX 
Agriculture Chicago 

Scabbard and Blade; Class Baseball (1), (2); 
Home Coming Committee (4) ; Military Ball 
Committee (4) ; Pan Hellenic Council (3)/^) : 
Lieutenant Colonel of the University Brigade; 
Commanding the Second Regiment (4). Agricul- 
tural Vice President of Illinois Union. 



Harold Emery Austin, TBII, ST 
Mechanical Engineering Chicago 

President of the Student Branch A. S. M. E. ; 
President of the Technograph Board ; Preliminary 
Honors. 

vxx* nl"""l 

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/ Charles Henry Bade 
Architecture Wahpeton, North Dakota 

Cosmopolitan Club; President of Der Deutsche 
Verein ; Director of Broad Sword Fencing; Grad- 
uate of the Royal Building School at Vienburg, 
Germany. 



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Edward Laurence Atkins. *A8 
Agriculture Rock Falls 

Entered after three years at Knox College. 



Alexis Matthew Bagusin 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. Science 
Le Cercle Francais; Rifle Club. 



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He played football. — Armstrong. 







John Willakd Bailey 
Architecture 

Architecture Club. 

Alfred Michael Baker, Jr., 2LT 
Agriculture Godfrey 

Scabbard and Blade; Mask and Bauble; Ionian 
Literary Society; Hoof and Horn Club; Manager 
of Class Track (3) 5 Captain in the University 
Brigade (4) ; In the cast of: "County Chairman , 
"The Gentleman from Mississippi", "The Passing 
of the Third Floor Back", and "The Great 
Galeoto". 

Frank Milton Bane, AZ 

Agriculture Pontiac 

Ma-Wan-Da; Freshman Varsity Baseball Squad 
(1); Varsity Baseball (2), (3), (4); Varsity 
Basketball (3), (-0- 

Harold Edward Barden, HKN 
Electrical Engineering South Pasadena, Calif. 
Treasurer of "Y" Club (4) ; American Institute 
of Electrical Engineers; Electrical Engineering 
Society Class Tennis (2), (3), (4); Freshman 
Varsity Tennis (1); Lieutenant (3) and Captain 
(4) in University Brigade. 



Lovington Agriculture 



Charles Pruden Barkman 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Princeton 



Ralph Lixdex Barlow, B6II, SAX 
L aw Urbana, Ohio 

Helmet; President of Ben Franklin Club (4); 
Elephi; Editor of the Siren (4), Siren Staff (2), 
< 3) ; Campus Scout Editor of the Daily Illim 
(4V Assistant Roast Editor of 191 5 IU10; Dope 
Sheet Staff (2). (3); J" nior Assistant Manager 
of the Interscholastic Circus '(3) I Senior Memor- 
ial Committee; Junior Smoker Committee. 



SOMENDRA NATH Deb BARMAN 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Bengal, India 
Corda Fratres. Cosmopolitan Club; Commercial 
Club- Le Cercle Francais ; Hindustanee Associa- 
tion of the University of Illinois; Entered from 
Ihe University of Calcutta. 




/ would rather be a kitten, and 1 1 y men 
7 han one oj these same metere ballad-mongers 



— Skin Basi 0W , 




Nelle Barnes, ASA 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Urbana 

Woman's Athletic Association ; Captain of Class 
Hockey Team (4) ; Class Basketball Team (2), 
(3), (4) ; Swimming Honors. 



Alexander Fraser Barron, 2T 
Mechanical Engineering Chicago 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 



Robert Olney Barnes, ATP 
Liberal Arts and Sciences LaGrange 

University Orchestra. 

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John Percival Beall, ATJJ 
and Sciences 



Alton 






Ward Powers Beard 



August Matthew BarreAj&I / * 

Architectural Engineering \D\ / ^^_ ^. _ J/\ 

n a j x t ■ / ■ Agriculture 

Bollendorf near Treves, Germany J 

Spaulding Guild ; First Regiment's Quarterns- Entered after tw0 >' ears at Knox Colle S e 

ter in University Brigade. 



Milledgeville 



Edna Barringer Martha Selma Beck, AKA 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Coffeen Liberal Arts and Sciences Indianapolis, Indiana 

Treasurer of the State Normal School Club. Mathematics Club. 




Company — viliianous company — hath been the spoil of me. — Beall. 




Helen Behrensmeyer, 'I'M 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Quincy 



William Jacob B'enner, AS* 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 



Edwin Louis Beifuss, XA 



Agriculture 



Emerson DeWitt Bell 
Electrical Engineering 

Electrical Engineering Society. 



Arthur Jacob Benner, AZ*, AXZ 
Ceramics 




Chicago 



Arthur Edward Benson, APX 
Architecture Chicago 

hitectural Club. 



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Frank Bergmann 
// l\.\MKhitcctural Engineering 



Chicago 



Chicago 



rl Anna May Bernhardt, ASA, ON 
and Sciences, Household Science 

Collinsville 

Yo Ma; Woman's Editor of 1916 Illio; First 
Cabinet of Y. W. C. A. (3) I Executive Committee 
of Woman's League (3), (4); Treasurer of 
Woman's League (3) ; Chairman Senior Hat 
Committee; Household Science Club. 




// to her share some female errors fall, 
Look on her face, and vu'll forget Hum all. 

Illlll! V M \:S IH. 




Harriet Josephine Berninger, KAII Arthur Barnes Bingham, Acanthus 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Mount Carinel Agriculture River Forest 

Woman's League ; Bethany Circle. Agricultural Club ; Senior Hat Committee ; Vice 

President of Senior Class. 



Charles Harry Berwald 
Electrical Engineering Dallas, Texj 

Menorah Society; Electrical Engineering 
ciety ; Lieutenant and Quartermaster in University 
Brigade (3). 




Ward Norris Black 
and Sciences 



Palestine 



Vera Beyer 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Journalism 



^//|A\\ George Washington Blake, ATft, ATP 

Civil Engineering Maywood 

Civil Engineers' Club; Class Football (3), (4) ; 
Class Swimming and Water Polo (2), (3), (4) ; 
Class Basketball (1) ; Secretary of Senior Class. 



Harry Edward Bigler, BTS, AAS 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Sigel 

Ben Franklin Club ; Commercial Club ; Normal 
School Club; Bookkeeper Daily Mini (3), Busi- 
ness Manager (4) ; Commercial Club Smoker 
Committee (3). 



Efra 



Edith Elliott Boggess, ON 
Agriculture, Household Science Cathn 

Y. W. C. A.; Normal School Club; Household 
Science Club ; Student Volunteer Band. 




/ would give all my fame for a pot of ale and safety. Kf.d Bi.ake. 




Macdonald Charles Booze, 2N, AX2 
Ceramics Sullivan 

Ma-Wan-Da; Ku Klux ; Varsity Football (2). 



Hazel Willa Bowlus 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Classical Club. 



Urbana 






Clara Borgelt, Achoth 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Normal School Club. 



Havana 




Canuto Octavio Borromeo 
Mechanical Engineering Cebu, Philippine Islands 
Cosmopolitan Club; Student Branch of Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers; University 
of the Philippines; University of California. 



LOREN CUSHING BOW, 211 

Ceramic Engineering Detroit, Michigan 

Scabbard and Blade; Freshman Varsity Foot- 
ball Squad (i); Class Football Team (2), (3), 
(4) Captain (3) ; Class Swimming and Polo 
Team (2), (3), (4), Captain (2); Senior Invita- 
tion Committee; Lieutenant (3) and Captain (4) 
of Signal Company in University Brigade. 



George Raymond Brannon 
Agriculture Dickinson, North Dakota 



I Leslie Orville Bright 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 

Foosland 

Normal School Club; Class Baseball; Class 
Basketball. 



Law 



Floyd Evanston Britton, <£AA 

Mound City 




As dean of men, Tommy is too competent to be desirable:- Mac Booze. 




William Sanford Brock Elmer Alfred Brown, KAN 

Agriculture Waynesburg, Pennsylvania Electrical Engineering Saint Louis, Missouri 

Horticultural Club. Electrical Engineering Society. 



Nathan Bromberg 
Ceramic Engineering Chicago Elmer Arthur Brown 

Menorah Society ; Ceramic Club ; Class Foot- Mechanical Engineering 
ball (4) ; Class Wrestling (3) ; Varsity Wrestling 
(4) ; Varsity Fencing (4). 



Urbana 



/yWiMES Fearon Brown, $A$ 



Fannie Maria Brooks, 2K, Achoth, <M* i 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science^ a f . 

Saunemin A.B., University of Illinois, 1913. 

Illiola Literary Society; Household Science 
Club. 



Urbana 



Agriculture 



John Bernis Brown, *AT 
Oscar Franklin Brooks Chemistry Rock Falls 

Chrisman Chemistry Club. 




Oh, hoiu he twists the mother English.— Bromberg. 




Lloyd Warfield Brown, *K*, ArP Everett Robert Brunskill, AXS, *AT 

Agriculture Jacksonville Chemistry Pontine 

Hoof and Horn Club. Manager of Class Football (3). 



Pembroke Holcomb Brown, Acacia, MKA 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Music Rock} 

Philomathean Literary Society. 



Ermane Gaylord Bucher, XB, ATP 
Ceramics Pontiac 

-University Band (1), (2), (3), (4), President 
(4); University Orchestra (1), 1 2 ) . (.5), (4); 
Gymnastic Team (2), (3), (4); Summer Illini 
Staff (2) ; Chairman Senior Hobo Band Commit- 
tee; Ceramics Club. 



Waldo Reinhart Brown 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, General S9Umc\ / 

Miles Center 



Katherine Mary Buenger, AOII 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Granite City 

Entered from Illinois Woman's College. 



Crane Simpson Bruner, ^T 
Civil Engineering Urbana 

Orange and Blue Dancing Club ; Junior Prom 
Committee; Senior Memorial Committee. 



Maude Emily Bull, KAG 
Agriculture, Household Science Union Grove 

Yo Ma; Household Science Club; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet (2), (3), (4); Student Volunteer Band; 
Woman's League Advisory Board (3), (4) ; 
Chairman of Self-Government Committee. 



y 

SB 




/ would ni't waste my spring <>/ youth iti idle dallianc*.- Maude Bull. 




Frank Avery Bush, Acacia, AK* 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Peoria 

Commercial Club ; Class Football (4) ; Illio Staff 
(3). 



Herbert William Bye, 4>A<t> 
Law Chicago 

Varsity Fencing (1) ; Class Football (1) ; 1914 
Illio Staff ; Manager Class Football (2) ; Presi- 
dent of Junior Class; K. O. T. B. ; Preliminary 
Honors in Law. 



George Howland Butler, BGLT, 2T 
Civil Engineering C hicago 

Scabbard and Blade ; Ku Klux ; Captain and 
Regimental Adjutant in University Brigade (4). ' 



Lloyd Raymond Caldwell 
Agriculture Neoga 

Agricultural Club; Hoof and Horn Club. 



Hillsdale 



Byrdie Blye Butzer 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Verna Viola Butzer 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Hillsdale 

Woman's Athletic Association ; First Y. W. C. 
A. Cabinet ; Student Volunteer Band ; Bethany 
Circle; Class Basketball (1), (2), (3), (4); 
Hockey Team (3), (4) ; Bowling Team (4). 



(5(5 ^/i-\^ °|sl 




ira Alice Canaday, AXfi 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Winchester, Indiana 

Woman's League ; Know Your City Committee 

of Y. W. C. A. ; Entered from DePauw Univer- 



Arnold Wilmore Carlsen 
Architectural Engineering Chicago 

Architectural Club; Junior Prom Committee 
(3) ; Homecoming Committee (4). 




For corn and cattle were his only care, 
And his supreme delight a country fair. 

— Caldwell. 




IjJ 

Charles Kneeland Carpenter Joseph Bernard Casserly 

Architecture Faribault, Minnesota Agriculture Champaign 

Scarab. 



William Harold Chambers, AZ 
. Agriculture Evanston 

Daniel Bernard Carroll Agricultural Club; Illinois Agriculturist Staff 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Pittsfield (?) ; Board of Managers (4) ; Chairman of Ag 

mce Committee (4). 




Tn 



Alice Carter, r$B, *A^', ON Tingit Harry Chan 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science Agriculture Shangshan, Canton, China 

Cosmopolitan Club ; International Agricultural 

Alethenai Literary Society; President of Y. W. Society of the University of Illinois; Entered 

C. A. (4). from Kaing Nan Industrial College, Nanking, 



<$< 



China. 



Lucile Carter Hari Chand 

Agriculture, Household Science Electrical Engineering Sial-Kote, Punjab, India 

Indianapolis, Indiana Cosmopolitan Club; Electrical Engineering So- 
Household Science Club. ciety ; Hindostani Association. 




The wild knows little of its greatest men. — Chambehs. 




m 
5 



i cm 



■HMunHnunnn 





Edward Neal Chapman 
Chemical Engineering Chicago 

Chemistry Club; Swimming Team (4). 



Glen Christy, MKA 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Music Harrisburg 

Glee and Mandolin Club (2), (3), (4); Philo- 
mathean Literary Society. 



Ralph Chapman, *K^, AK4' 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Vienna 

Ma-Wan-Da ; Helmet ; Ku Klux ; Egyptian 
Club; Class Football (1); Varsity Football (2), 
(3), (4), Captain (4). 

John Baptist Chartrand, ST 
Electrical Engineering East St. Louis 

Electrical Engineering Society ; Gymnastic 
Team (3) ; Junior Smoker Committee; Rifle Team 
(2). 



Helen Beulah Clarke 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Urbana 

Illiola Literary Society; Choral Society (1), 
(2). (3). (4); illiola-Adelpbic Play (2); 'A Ca- 
l.clla Choir (3) ; Mixed Glee Club. 



Electrical Engineering 



Albert Jay Clarkson 



Champaign 



Yun Tin Cheng 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Knangtnng, China 

Chinese Students' Club; Cosmopolitan Club; 
Railway Club; Formerly a student at University 
of London and University of Birmingham, Eng- 
land. 



Ikl Reuben Cline, TBII 
Civil Engineering 

Captain in the University Brigade. 



Medora 



m 

y 




Where the bee sinks there suck I. — Slooie Shakespeare. 




Ira Newton Clover, 211, ATP 
Municipal and Sanitary Engineering Gardner 



David Clyman 
Architectural Engineering Chicago 

Menorah Society; Class Football (2), (4). 




** ~ 



Harry Frank Cogdall, <i>K>I', AFP, AZ 

Agriculture Chicago 

Ma-Wan-Da; Illinois Union Dramatic Club; 
Illinois Union Council (3) ; Class Football (2) ; 
Varsity Baseball (2), (3), (4) ; Captain (4) ; 
Business Staff 1915 Illio ; Home Coming Commit- 
tee (3), (4)- 






Paul Wayne Coleman 
. Igriculturc Lewistown 

Mildred Leann Coburn lfl\ ', m K 
Liberal Arts and Sciences McLean Mary Elizabeth Collom, ON 

Der Deutsche Verein ; Normal School Club; Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 
Choral Society. Oxnard, Calif oria 

Illinois Agriculturist Staff ; Household Science 
flub; Geneva Club; Second Cabinet of Y. W. 
C. A. 



s 



Charles Blake Cochran, ATA 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Marion 

Scarab; Architectural Club (2), (3) ; Entered 
from Texas State University. 



Harold Edward Colson, ATP 
Agriculture St. Charles 



9, 

i 




The best gifts come m small packages. Slip Cogsall, 



nnnff 

■ 




f 

i 



■ 



Daniel Franklin Comstock, ^T 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Evanston 
Helmet ; Ku Klux Klan ; Freshman Varsity 
Baseball ; Freshman Varsity Basketball ; Varsity 
Basketball Squad (2), (3), (4). 



Lynn S. Corbly, $AA 



Lazv 



Pax ton 



Edward Alden Cooper, AA* 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Helmet; Class Basketball (1), (2), ($L 



LaGrange 



Chalmers Woodruff Crawford, AZ 
Agriculture Pontiac 



Agricultural Club; Class Baseball (1), (2), (3). 



>; 



Kenneth Lupton Cooper, AKE 
Civil Engineering LaGrange 

Helmet ; Ku Klux Klan ; Glee and Mandolin 
Club (3), (4); President (4); Assistant Varsity 
Baseball Manager (3) ; Senior Hobo Band Com- 
mittee. 'V 




Helen Lucile Crawford 



Urbana 



Beatrice Virginia Copley, KA9, <f>BK 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Joliet 

Yo Ma; Alethenai Literary Society, President 
(4): Senior Memorial Committee; Second Cabi- 
net of V. W. C. A. (1), (2), (3); Advisory 
Board of Woman's League (2). 



Edward Woodin Creighton, *K2 
Agriculture Fai 

Comitatus Club; Egyptian Club. 




There's not a parallel of latitude but thinks it would hare seen the equator if it had its rights. — Comstock. 




LUCKETIA CrESSEY 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Mattoon 

Entered from Illinois Woman's College. 



Wesley Erett Cummins, *AA 
Laic Carbondale 

Law Smoker Committee (3) ; Preliminary Hon- 
ors in Law; A.B., McKendree College 1910; Law 
Scholarship (3), (4). 



Donald Eugene Currier, ATA 
Agriculture Aurora 

Edward Criss Helmet ; Ku Klux ; Freshman Varsity Track ; 

Agriculture Champaign Varsity Track (3), (4) ; Class Football (3) ; Ath- 

letic Editor of 1916 Illio; Assistant Athletic Edi- 
tor of Daily Illini (4) ; Sophomore Smoker Com- 
mittee. 

Dorothy Lucile Cuthbert 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Walter Louis Crutcher Gilsum, New Hampshire 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Springfield, Missouri Congregational Girls' Guild ; Choral Society; 

Classical Club; Psychology Club. 

Vincent Joseph Cylkowski, 4>K 

Civil Engineering Chicago 

Siren Staff (1), (2), (3) ; Daily Illini Staff (3) ; 

1915 Illio Staff; Manager Class Swimming Team 

Harold Lane Cummings, XB, BrS <3 ) . Q ass Treasurer (4) ; Cast of "The Prodigal 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Clinton Prince" (2). 





I've taken my inn where I've /,'»»,/ 1/. 
/'re rogued and I've ranged in my inn,-. 

ZEKK ('UKRIER. 




John William Dammers, Aft 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Chicago 



Margarete Lucile Dauberman 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Mansfie< 

Bethany Circle; Second Cabinet of Y. W. C. A 
(4) ; Finance Committee of Y. W. C. A. (3). 






Samuel Sylvester Davis 
Agriculture Newport, Indiana 

Agricultural Club, President (4) ; Hoof and 
Horn Club; Class Football (2), (3), (4); Class 
Basketball (2), (3), (4); Staff of the Illinois 
Agriculturist (3), (4) ; Lieutenant and Quarter- 
master (3) and Captain (4) in the University 
Brigade; Vice President Junior Class. 

Helen Mary Dawson, SK, KAU. 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Morris 

Yo Ma; Illiola Literary Society; Der Deutsche 
Verein; Y. W. C. A. Membership Committee (4) ; 
Freshman Honors. 



Anna Elizabeth Daugherty 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Sullivan 



Agru 

Mi 



Paul Newhall Davis, X$ 
■ulture Arlington Heights 

litary Band (2), (3) ; Varsity Football (3). 



Homer Ward Deakman, 9AX 
Civil Engineering Chicago 

Lambkins Club ; Illinois Union Dramatic Club ; 
Tribe of the Illini ; Class Basketball (2); 1915 
Illio Staff; Manager of Varsity Track (4) ; Busi- 
ness Manager of Student Opera (4) ; Sophomore 
Cotillion Committee ; Sophomore Emblem Com- 
mittee ; Homecoming Committee (3). 

Benjamin Harrison Decker 
Electrical Engineering Brazil. Indiana 

Scabbard and Blade; E. E. Society; Class Foot- 
ball (2); Varsity Football (3); Class Basketball 
(1), (2) ; Captain in the University Brigade. 




He teas a man, take him all in all. I shall not look upon his like again. — Deakman. 




William Charles Deiss 
Electrical Engineering Carlinville 

Electrical Engineering Society. 



Oscar Caspes Detering 
Liberal Arts and Sciences St. Louis, Missouri 
Railway Club ; Commercial Club .Cass Fencing 
Team (i) ; Class Swimming and Water Basket- 
ball Team (3). 



Tack Erwin Demuth, Triangle, AA1 

,. ., t • • c/ /ohm- Missouri Thomas Wilbur Dieckmann 

"cbit-^TeamU^M^rUKTecbn,, Lih cral Arts and Sciences, Business VanMia 

graph Board (2), (3) , (4) ; Assistant .Manager of ,X 

Technograph (3). (4); Crystal Dancing Club. 



Sylvester Randall Derby, L 
Civil Engineering ■ 1/ ^"» Par * 

Tribe of the Illini ; Freshman Varsity Football; 
Varsity Football (2), (3). < 4) , Class Baseball 
(1), (2), (3), (4); Varsity Basketball (2), (3) ♦ 
Class Sweater Committee (2). 



Ci \rence Gordon De Swarte, A2# 
Electrical Engineering Chicago 



iQfe Margaret Dietzkr, Xfi, ON 

Science 

La Grange 

household Science Club; Woman's 
League Advisory Board ; Woman's Athletic Asso- 
ciati m. 



fAi.hi M \rcaret D11 1 /ik. -V>. 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household 
us ' ' 



Essel Ray Dillavou, *AA, BrS 
/ iberal Arts and Sciences, Business Champaign 
Innes of Court; Commercial Club; 1915 Illio 
Staff; Lieutenant (3) and Captain (4) m Univer- 
sity Brigade. 



i^a« 




'ou should see him as « speech maker. 



I 1 1 n) ■ 




Ira W. Dingledine 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Normal School Club. 



Peoria 



Margaret Isabella Doherty, MKA 
Music Urbatia 



Bernhard Ernst George Dirks, TBII 
Architecture Koetyschenbrod 

Cosmopolitan Club. 



Earl Joseph Dix 
Electrical Engineering Marseilles 

Electrical Engineering Society; Assistant Ad- 
vertising Manager of Electrical Show (S&t. 




Ethel Mary Dole, ON 
Agriculture, Household Science Manteno 

:nal School Club ; Gregorian Literary So- 
Entered from Illinois State Normal Uni- 

o\Ol 

sizzL 

|illian Dora Dole, KALT 

Liberal Art sand Sciences, General Science 

Manteno 

Normal School Club; Jamesonian Literary So- 
ciety; Entered from Illinois State Normal Uni 
versitv. 



Verm, Foster Dobbins, TKE, 1IKN, ST 
Electrical Engineering Champaign 

Electrical Engineering Society; Advertising 
.Manager of Electrical Show; Senior Hat Com- 
mittee; Class Secretary (3). 



Justin Aloysius Pumas 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 

Shelbyville 




Though pleased to see the dolphins play, 
I mind my compass to my work. 

— Dobbins. 




Henry Dubin, Cosmopolitan Club 
Architecture Chicago 

Menorah Society; Architectural Club; Class 
Football (4) ; Illio Art Staff (3), (4) ; Assistant 
Art Editor (4) ; Architectural Year Book Com- 
mittee (3), (4) ; Senior Smoker Committee; Pre- 
liminary Honors. 



David Woods Dunlap, AZ 
Agriculture Champaign 

Horticultural Club; Agricultural Club; Class 
Baseball (3). 



Fred Alan Du Hadway, no 
Law Jc 

Illinois Union Junior Councilman (3) ; Law 
Vice President (4) ; Chairman Sophomore 
Cotillion Committee; Homecoming Committee 
(3) (4); Freshman Smoker Committee; Pre- 
liminary Honors; Second Law Scholarship (2); 
First Law Scholarship (3). 



Marshall Simeon Dutton, AKE, ST 
Municipal and Sanitary Engineering Oak Park 
Lambkins Club; Illinois Union Dramatic Club; 
Glee and Mandolin Club (1), (2), (3); Leader 
Glee Club (3). 



Wheaton 



SVEN DuNER, AT 

Agriculture 

Freshman Varsity Baseball; Freshman Varsity 
Basketball; Varsity Basketball (2), (3). U) i 
Captain (4). 

Lawrence Henry Dunham, *AT 
Chemical Engineering LaSalle 

Scabbard and Blade; Congregational Guild; 
American Chemical Society; Lieutenant (3) and 
Captain (4) in University Brigade. 




enry Charles Eckstein, *AT 



Chemistry 



Peoria 



Edith Edgar, <I>A^' 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Greensboro, Maryland 
Athenian Literary Society. 




Tunes sivec 



t as honey front his lips distillld.— DUTTON. 







Alwin Clyde Eide, AXS, $AT 
Chemical Engineering 
Chemical Club ; Preliminary Honors. 



Jeannette Morrison Engle 
Lee Liberal Arts and Sciences Urbana 

Bethany Circle ; Y. W. C. A. ; Gregorian Liter- 
ary Society. 



Mildred Roach Elder 
/ iberal Arts and Sciences Albany, Georgia 

Entered from James Milliken University. 



Ruth Ernest 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Urbana 

Gregorian Literary Society; Arkansas Club; 
Sevvanee Circle. 




w. 



Aram Movses Eleazaria 
Electrical Engineering Teheran, Persia 

Cosmopolitan Club, Corda Fratres ; Le Cercle 
Francais ; L'Alliance Franchise. 



ALTER BOYNTON ERWIN 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Chicago 



Commercial Club ; Freshman Varsity Baseball 
and Basketball; Varsity Baseball (2); Varsity 
Basketball (2), (3), (4) ; Pushball Committee 
(i) ; Junior Prom Committee; Homecoming Com- 
mittee (4) ; Class Sergeant-at-Arms (2). 



Edward Charles Elles, Iris, Brs 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Herrin 

Scabbard and Blade ; Commercial Club ; Na- 
tional Reserve Corps ; Chairman of Cadet Hop 
Committee (4) ; Major in the University Brigade. 



Leo Eslick 

Mechanical Engineering Lead, South Dakota 
Student Branch American Society of Mechan- 
ical Engineers ; Junior Smoker Committee ; Pre- 
liminary Honors. 




On right into grand HARCH — Elles. 




Philip Hiram Evf.rhart 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Law Champaign 

limes of Court; Adelphic Literary Society. 



Florence Fehrman 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Senior Hat Committee. 



Frank Webster Farley 

Agriculture Jonesboro, / 

Hoof and Horn Club; Arkansas Club 



Orena Farmer 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Guy Columbus Faurote, 4>FA 
Architecture Mies, Michigan 

Scarab- Orange and Blue Dancing Club, Man- 
ager Senior Athletics; Business Manager Archi- 
tectural Year Book (4). 



Clarence Milford Ferguson, 6AX 

Landscape Architecture 

Grand Forks, North Dakota 

-Wan-Da; Ku Klux ; Helmet; Scarab; 
U ] \ s - I ribe of the Mini; Illinois Union 
Dramatic Club; Landscape Club; Business Staff 
of Siren (3) ; Circulation Manager of Siren (4) ; 
Pushball Committee (2) ; Chairman Smoker Com- 
mittee (2); Homecoming Committee (4); As- 
sistant Manager Varsity Baseball (3); Manager 

UL 

S*/ames Edward Fetherston 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 

Wrestling Team (2); Lieutenant in University 

'"■Brigade (4). 

Julian Lounsbury Fish, *rA 
Agriculture Buffalo, New York 

Tribe of the Illini ; North Atlantic Club; Fresh- 
man Varsity Track; Varsity Track Team (3). 




A gym rat gra 



iuatad with honor. Ferguson. 




Abigail Elisa Fisher, a^a 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Geneseo 

Yo Ma. 



Frank Alfred Forty, T1UI, IIKN 
Electrial Ecngineering Chicago 

Freshman Class Fencing Team ; Class Swim- 
ming Team (2), (3); Student Member of A. I. 
E. E. ; K. O. T. B'. 



Chi 




Harold Leo Flodin, $SK 
Mechanical Engineering 



Alden Knowlton Fogg, Acanthus, TBLT 
Civil Engineering Wenona 

Secretary of the Illinois Students' Union (4) ; 
C. E. Club; Varsity Baseball (2) ; Class Baseball 
(1), (3); Class Basketball (2), (3V^0^r^^ 
Fencing Team (2); Junior Cap Committee; 
Senior Invitation Committee ; Class President 
(3); Class Treasurer (2); Preliminary H mors. 



Wiley Marion Fowler 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 



ft 

Dis 



Penfield 



isk Sylvester Frayer, no 
Civil Engineering Maywooi 

Senior Smoker Committee. 



George Carlyle Fray'er 
Everett Orren Fontaine Agriculture Lockport 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Momence Hoof and Horn Club; Illinois Society of 

Spaulding Guild. Agronomy. 




Here is a strange man indeed, an ardent AHA fusser. — Fogg. 




Arthur Owen Frazier 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Pans 

Adelphic Literary Society; Board of Oratory 
and Debate (4) ; Freshman-Sophomore Debate 
(2); Cast of "Mr. Stineman's Corner" (3). 



Mary Hazel Frye, Achoth 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Fairbur? 

Normal School Club ; Advisory Board of Worn 
an's League. 






Elizabeth Genevieve Fuller 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Chelsea, Michigan 



Harold Coulon Fuller 
Architecture Indianapolis, Indiana 

Scarab ; Architectural Club ; Illinois Union Dra- 
matic Club; Cast of "The Prodigal Prince" (2) ; 
First Architectural Club Play (2). 



Clare Curtiss Gamble, AA*, BT2 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business 

Malone, Neiv York 

Railway Club; North Atlantic Club; Commer- 
cial Club; Pan Hellenic Council (3), (4) ; Junior 
Assistant Manager of Varsity Baseball; Junior 
Prom Committee; Senior Memorial Committee; 

omecoming Committee. 

John Low Gardiner, B0II 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Chicago 

■ 1 VS. tj I"""!. 

William Raymond Garten 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 

Odon, Indiana 




Edward Franklin Gehrig 
Mechanical Engineering Grantfork 

Adelphic Literary Society; Vice President (3) 
of Student Branch A. S. M. E.; Class Baseball 
(1) (3); Sophomore Smoker Committee; Junior 
Prom Committee; Senior Memorial Committee; 
Homecoming Committee; Push Ball Captain (2) ; 
Class Treasurer (1). 




Ne. 



xl to liimself he loveth Prof. Thompson best.— Gardinei. 







Charles Francis Geiger _ Leonard Nason Gilmore 

Ceramic Engineering Chicago 9 



Mo line 



Leslie Godfrey George, SX 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Staunton 

Ku Klux; Innes of Court; Comitatus; Paii- 
Hellenic Council; Vice President Pan-Hellenic 
Council (4); Class Football (1), (2) ; Assistant 
Business Manager Daily Illini (3) ; Chairman 
Homecoming Program Committee (4) ; Senior 
Invitation Committee ; Secretary Y. M. C. A. Em 
ployment Bureau (4). 



Roy Thomas Glassco 
Agriculture Urbana 

Agricultural Club; Hoof and Horn Club; Ag 
Dance Committee (4). 




Mable Helen Gibson, ON N, 
Household Science Woodstock 

Household Science Club. 



Rodney Champlin Glover, *A* 
Law Ottawa 

Class Football (2), (4) ; Junior Prom Commit- 
tee ; Senior Memorial Committee ; Homecoming 
Committee (4). 



George Thallon Gill, SX 
Landscape Architecture Evanston Walter Earl Glover 

Scarab; U. L. A. S. ; Siren Staff (3). Architecture Topcka, Kansas 




Night after night he sat and bleared his eyes with books. — Les. George. 




Eleanor Godfrey 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Wesley Barton Golden 
Urbana Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Champaign 



Irma Gretchen Goebel 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Urbana 

Illiola Literary Society; Jamesonian Literar 
Society ; Der Deutsche Verein ; Championshil 
Basketball Team (3); L. and A. Representative 
of Woman's League. 




William Henry Goelitz, 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Ku Klux ; Pan Hellenic Council ^&^sQ^ 
Varsity Track Team (2), (3), (4); Class Foot- 
ball (3), (4) ; Social Editor of the 1915' Illio ; 
Homecoming Committee. 



Ellis Ralph Goldman, ZBT 
Civil Engineering Rockford 

Engineers' Club. 



Vera Ople Gossett, ON 



/ iberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 
///|.\Vs JOJgjj Casey 




Enter 
School, 



from Eastern Illinois State Normal 



■ 


Roy Allen Goff, 2N 




Football 


Agriculture 




Galcsburg 


(2) ; Va 


a 









Perry Henry Graves, XB, AK^ 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Rockford 
Commercial Club; Tribe of the Illini ; Cap- 
tain of Freshman Varsity Football (2) ; Varsity 
(3), (4); Freshman Varsity Baseball 
(2); Varsity' Baseball (3), (4)- 



A^l 



i 




— "*- 



ill great men are dead or dying, and I don't feel well myself. Graves. 







7UU 



Alta Green 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Urbana 

Athenian Literary Society; Jamesonian Liter- 
ary Society; Advisory Board of Woman's League 
(3) ; Class Basketball (1) ; 1914 Iluo Board (2) ; 
President of Junior Illinae; Freshman and Pre- 
liminary Honors. 



iiULALiE Green 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Oakzvood 



Ralph Green, #A9, TBII, tfr \ 
Civil Engineering Chicago 

Freshman Varsity Swimming ( 1 ) ; Varsity 
Swimming (2) ; Preliminary Honors; C. E. Club. 



Joseph Nathaniel Greene, SN 
Agriculture Chicago 

Ma-Wan-Da; Scabbard and Blade,; Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council; Gridiron Club; Social Editor of 
1916 Illio; Colonel and Bridade Commander of 
the University Brigade. 



^Jack Mitchell Griffin, AKE, ArP 

Agriculture Evanston 

'Helmet; Tribe of the Illini ; Track Squad (2) ; 
Swimming Team (2), (3), (4). Captain (4); 
Freshman Varsity Swimming Team. 



jEVMildred Elizabeth Griffith 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Ashton 

' Alethenai Literary Society. 



Roland Everegg Greenburg, Bus 

Mechanical Engineering New Richmond, Indiana 
University Band (1), (2), (3), (4); Prelimin- 
ary Honors. 



Jim Howard Griftner, <t>K2 
Mining Engineering Champaign 




Cross out my name and .(/ 



,/ spell il in large capitals. — Joseph Nathaniel Greene. 




9 

i 

m 
i 



George Durfee Griswold 
Mechanical Engineering Chicago 

Mandolin Club (2), (3), (4) ; Leader (4) ; 
Lieutenant and Quartermaster (3) and Captain 
(4) in University Brigade. 



Augustus Henry Grunewald, Jr., Z-ir, AZ 
Agriculture Chicago 

Scabbard and Blade; Class Football (l), (,2), 
(4) ; Freshman Varsity Water Polo; Military 
Ball Committee (4) ; Lieutenant and Adjutant 
(3) and Lieutenant-Colonel (4) in University 
Brigade. 



Edith Gwinn, Ar 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Urbana 
Yo Ma. 



Vernon William Haag 

Chemistry Mason 

Chemical Club; Class Baseball (1), (2), (3). 




I 



Lillian Irene Guffin 
Liberal Arts and Sciences LJiampaign 

Athenian Literary Society ; Winner of Inter- 
Literary Society Declamation Contest (3). 



George William Haan, Jr., St'T 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Aurora 

Freshman Varsity Football ; Varsity Football 
(2) ; Class Football (3) ; Lieutenant (3) in Uni- 
versity Brigade. 



Palmer Mackenzie Gunnell, •SAA 
Law Wichita, Kansas Arthur Hagener, TBII 

Law Smoker Committee (4). Civil Engineering Beardstown 




None but herself can be her parallel. Khun (Iwinn. 




William Stiles Haggott, Acacia, ST 
Electrical Engineering Keokuk, Iowa 

Student Branch American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers; E. E. Society; Treasurer E. E. So- 
ciety (4) ; Treasurer Electrical Show (4). 



Harry Ingalls Hannah 
Law 
A.B'., University of Illinois 1913. 



Urbana 



Arthur Ferdinand Hakanson j 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Chicago 



Herbert Henry Harris, KAN 
Agriculture Cairo 

Agricultural Club; Class Track Team. 



hka Y&-\ y\ 



Chicago 




Gertrude Halus 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Andrew B'aker Hammitt, litis 
Architectural Engineering DesMoines, Iowa 

Ma-Wan-Da ; Scarab ; President of Tribe of the 
Illini; Freshman Varsity Track; Varsity Track 
(j). (3), (4); Sophomore Cotillion Committee; 
Military Ball Committee (2). Homecoming 
Committee (4). 



Lois Myrtle Harris 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Preliminary Honors. 



Sheldon 



Mandel H. Harris 
Architecture Chicago 

Architectural Club; Entered from Armour In- 
stitute. 







Not to know me argues yourself unknown. — Hammitt. 




Eugene Milton Harsch 
Agriculture Peoria 

Agricultural Club; Hoof and Horn Club; Illi- 
nois Society of Agronomy. 



Fred Albert Hkalv, ATA, ATP 
Agriculture Aurora 

Helmet; Ku Klux ; Class Football (i), (2), 
(4) ; Varsity Football Squad (3). 



Edith Mary Heath 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Rochclle 

Gregorian Literary Society ; Class Basketball 
(j), (3), (4); Class Hockey (4). 



Trevor Morse Heath, X* 
tltur 



Roland Emerson Hart, II KN 
Electrical Engineering Cleveland, Ohio 

E. E. Society ; American Institute of Electrical 
Engineers ; Entered from Case Scbool of Applied 
Science, Cleveland, Ohio. 

. / / -N ^"Am icuJJS&l Toledo, Ohio 

Naoma R. Hartford, AAA, KA* . Comhatas . IQI5 Ill10 Staff . Pushball Commit- 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Champaign tee (I) . p ost Exam Jubille (3). 

Woman's League; Y. W. C. A. Entered from 
N Drthwestern University. 

John Franklin Hedgecock, Jr., 211 

Agriculture Plymouth 

Carl Hauber Ionian Literary Society; Agricultural Club; 

Architecture. Springfield, Missouri Agricultural Glee Club (3). 





/ am a man more tinned mnini.ii than sinning. Nig IIi.uy. 



1/1'v special 1 cquest) 




John Harrison Hedgcock 
Agriculture Plymouth 

Agricultural Club; Congregational Guild. 






Alfred Martin Heinzelmann, AXS, *AT 
Chemical Engineering Aurora 

American Chemical Society; Chemical Club; 
Preliminary Honors. 

Linn Helander, no, TBH 

Mechanical Engineering Chicago 

Student Branch of the American Society of 

Mechanical Engineers ; Junior Prom Committee ; 

Senior Stag Committee ; Preliminary Hortaj^v : 



Chester Abram Hemphill, ATO 
Agriculture Jacksonville 



Mary Anne Henry, T*B 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Paloma 

Vice President Gregorian Literary Society; 
-Advisory Board of Woman's League; Second 
Cabinet "of Y. W. C. A.; Entered from Illinois 
Woman's College. 



E 



Lillie Isabel Helgeland 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Normal School Club. 



Elliott 



Ralph Leroy Hermann, Acacia, HKN 
lectrical Engineering Woodbine 

Scabbard and Blade; Ionian Literary Society; 

Electrical Engineering Society, Secretary (3). 

President (4); Class Football (4); Manager of 

Electrical Show (4); Senior Smoker Committee; 

Lieutenant (3). Captain and Regimental Adjutant 

JfHn University Brigade. 



Oral Vera Hess 
Liberal Arts and Sciences _ Sidney 

President of Gregorian Literary Society. 



1 




Brain him with his ladies fan. — Chet Hemphill. 




rzau 



James Bukr Hickman, 4>KS 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business 

Asheville, North Carolina 

Reporter on Sporting Staff of Daily Mini ; Busi- 
ness Staff or 1916 Illio. 



Louis John Hills, 211, ATP 
Municipal and Sanitary Engineering Joliet 

Class Football (3). Captain (4); Chairman 
Sophomore Emblem Committee; Junior Prom 
Committee ; Senior Hat Committee ; Homecom- 
ing Committee; Class Vice President! 4«7|J S/ . . 

Robert Bruce H in man, A% 
Agriculture Dundee 

Cosmopolitan Club; Adelphic Literary Society; 
Captain in the University Brigade. 



Clara Lillie Hirtzel 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Effingham 



Earl Wilkie Hitchcock, AZ 
Agriculture Hallowell, Kansas 

Adelphic Literary Society; Agricultural Club; 
Country Life Club; Horticultural Club; Staff of 
Illinois Agriculturist (3). 



Agnes Virginia Hitt 



Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Hcrrick 

Woman's Athletic Association, President (4) '. 
Household Science Club; Jamesonian Literary 
Society; Basketball (1), (2), (3), Captain and 
Championship (2); Hockey Team (4). 



George Phillip Hinton. A*A 
Mechanical Engineering Cleveland, Ohio 

Entered from Case School of Applied Science, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 



Katherine Hitt 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Gregorian Literary Society. 



Chicago 




His clothes havi Hud "Royal Tailored" look. Hickman. 




Nai Ching Ho Maurice Elon Hoit, XB 

I ■ Liberal Arts and Sciences Canton, China Agriculture Geneseo 

Scabbard and Blade ; Agricultural Club ; Captain 
of Battery University Brigade. 



Frank A. Hoernkr 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Peotone Henry Walter Hollard 

Psychology Club. Agriculture Highland 

Winner of University Gold Medal (2); Agri- 
cultural Club. 

1 (** fill s~ 

Anna Cathryn Hoffert, AOLI 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Pckiu 



Yo Ma. 



^yk> 






J. and scape Architecture 



Noble Parker Hollister 



Champaign 



Scarab ; U. L. A. S. 



Arthur Christopher Hoffman 
Agriculture Knoxville Max Holmburger, Jr., TBII 

Agricultural Club; A.B. Lombard College. Mechanical Engineering Chicago 



9 

i 




His words of learning strength and thundering sound, 
Amazed the gazing rustics, ranged around. 

- — IIOJT. 




Clifford Firoved Hood, x<l>, ST, I1KN 
Electrical Engineering Cameron 

Scabbard and Blade; Ionian Literary Society; 
Electrical Engineering Society; Class Basketball 
(2) ■ Business Manager of E. E. Show; Military 
Ball Committee (2), (3);, Lieutenant (3) and 
Major (4) in University Brigade. 

William Hornal, 2X 
Agriculture, Lanscape Architecture 

St. Louis, Missouri 
Scarab; U. L. A. S. ; Landscape Club; Shomccz. 

William Hoskins, Jr., AA*, AK* 
Liberal Arts and Sciences LaGrange 

Class Basketball (1), (2), (3). 



Charles Dean Howk 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Momence 



Gor Hsi Hu 

Municipal and Sanitary Engineering 



Lan 



Joseph Columbus Hostetler, Jr., %■* 

Decatur 



Canton, China 



1 iMarie Esther Hubbard 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Hazen, Arkansas 




Ma-Wan-Da; Helmet; Ku Klux Klan ; Scab- 
bard and Blade; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Junior 
Councilman Illinois Union (3); Varsity Dancing 
Club; Business Staff or 1915 Illio ; Illinois Maag- 
zine (2); Assistant Manager Post Exam Jubilee 
(3); Junior Prom Committee; Senior Memorial 
Committee; Homecoming Committee (3), (4) > 
First Lieutenant (3) and Major (-0 m Univer- 
sity Brigade. 



w> 



Arthur Herman Huisken, AX2, *AT 

Chemical Engineering Chicago 

Scabbard and Blade ; Preliminary Honors ; Cap- 
tain in the University Brigade; American Chem- 
ical Society; Chemical Club. 




/„ wit a num. simpl 




Sidney Marion Hull, AX2 
Chemistry Montello, Wisconsin 

American Chemical Society ; Chemical Club ; 
Entered from Carroll College, Waukesha, Wis. 



Robert Maurice Husband 
Mechanical Engineering Litchfield 

Senior Class President; Junior Smoker Com- 
mittee; Home Coming Committee (4). 



Urbana 



Stanley Pieffer Irvin, 2AX 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Journalism 

Griffith, Indiana 
ibblers Club ; Ren Franklin Club ; Dope 
Sheet (3) ; Illinois Magazine (3), (4) ; Editor 
Illinois Magazine (4). 



Mabel Clare Jackson, AOII 



Liberal <lrts and Sciences Danville 

KE w W ^" a / S A T th, 1 tk Asso ^ iati . on .i Fir ^ Cabinet Y. 

. . , VV. L. A.; Membership Committee Y. W. C. A. 

A 9rtculture Roodhouse u) . Basketball (1), (2), (3), (4); Captain (1); 

Tribe of the Illini; Freshman Varsity Track; Hoekev Team (4). 
Varsity Track (2), (3), (4) ; Class Football (4). 



Walter Herman Jacobsen, *T 
Liberal .Irts and Sciences, General Business 
Lee Alfred Husted, TKE Urbana 

Agriculture Roodhouse Commercial Club; Mask and Bauble. 



■ 




Far off his coming shown. — Husted, 




Walter Wilson Jennings, KMI 
Kanjit Singh Jain . Champaign 

Electrical Engineering Delhi, India Liberal Arts and Saences 

Cosmopolitan Club; Hindustani Association of 
Unive sit' of Illinois; E. E. Society; University 
of Benjal, India; University of California. 



i Tim ttkn "S**^ Milton Owen Jensen, *T, AK* 

Electrical Engineering c •♦ . '- wu " 

Technograph Board (3), (4); E. E. Society. 
pSnniKiry Honors; Lieutenant (3), Captain and 



Q 



uartermaster (4) in University Brigade. 



b\wi 



£'/i-tfSi*te 



Lenton Willis James, AH 






PKiSS # £<"ii 



& 



Hubert Jessen 



. Igriculture 



Canton Agriculture 



Alio Pass 



William Bancroft Jakvis, Jr., AT 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Law Chicago 

Prince' (2), 



Louis Samuel Johnson 



Agriculture 



Champaign 




II, drawsth out the thi 



ead of his verbosity finer than his argument. Jaevm. 




Maroi.h Sucf.se Johnson, AT 
Architecture Chicago 

Helmet; Ku Klux; Military Band; Onyx Danc- 
ing Club. 



Marjorie Marie June, AXO 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Belvidere 

Pan-Hellenic Representative (3), (4); First 
Cabinet of Y. W. C. A. (3) ; Advisory Board of 
Woman's League (3) ; Y. W. C. A. Extension 
Committee (3) ; Chairman of Poster Committee 
(4). 



Milton Jones 
Electrical Engineering 

Entered from Lake Forest College. 



Raymond Ruth Amanda Kaar, AXfi 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Princeton 

Athenian Literary Society ; Entered from 



Northwestern University. 



Paul Erastus Jones, K2 Frances Ford Keen, LIB*, <M* 



Architecture 

Scarab; Architectural Club. 



Tulsa, Oklahoma Liberal Arts and Sciences Pueblo, Colorado 

Yo Ma ; Mask and Bauble ; Y. W. C. A. Mem- 
bership Committee. 



Jook Hing Jue Albert William Keese, ^A 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Canton, China Ceramics Litchfield 

Illinois Chinese Students' Club; Cosmopolitan Ceramics Club; Class Baseball (2); Senior 

Club ; Commercial Club. Smoker Committee. 




There was never yet fair woman but she made mouths in the glass. -Frances Keen. 




Claire Taylor Keigley 
Mechanical Engineering 
Transfer from Iowa State College. 



Iowa 



Amelia Lucinda Kellogg, KKT 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Aur 

llliola Literary Society; Basketball UK 2% 
(3); Women's Athletic Association ,1915 U*» 
Staff- Senior Hat Committee; Class Orfacer (3). 



Luther Eugene KenneA£- 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, General ^^^ 

Geology Journal Club. 



Wayne Isaac KiRby. Acacta 

. , .. , Decatur 

Architecture . 

Lambkins; Scarab; University Band (l), (a), 
(i) (a) President (3); Choral Society U), 
University Orchestra; Preliminary Honors. 

Helmuth Julius Kircher, 2N 

griculturc . * 

Ma-Wan-Da; Tribe of the Illini; Varsity Bas- 
ketball 2), (3). (4); Class BasketbaM ^(2) 
Staff of the 1915 Illio; Manager of Class Basket 
ball {2\\ Homecoming Committee UL 



sVOl 

[-TM.TOS Spurgeon KIHK.Z*. *BK, ATP 
1 iberal Arts and Sciences, Law Belleflower 

Tunes of Court; Associate Editor of the 191S 
Illlio; Junior Cap Committee; Preliminary Hon- 

ors. 



„ . , \rchibald Farley Kirkland, AA* 

Leslie Arthur Kibbe, Triangle Cambridge 

, ^ ■ ■ Mavu'ood Architecture 

SrSSafSTSil-. : O- hE*- ; B H. ta =, : Ed it o, 0< „, W A*— *- 

Cadet Hop Committee (2). 




He losi a tooth in that manly 




George Charles Klehm, Jr. Wilbert George Knoebel 

Agriculture Arlington Heights Architecture Highland 

Scarab; Class Baseball (2); Junior Smoker 
Committee. 

Lloyd Dun away Knapp, XB 
Civil Engineering Ottawa 

Scabbard and Blade; Vice President of C. E. 
Club (4) ; College Dancing Club ; Business Staff Joseph Ludwig Kobylanski 

of 1915 Illio; Military Ball Committee (3); Se- Architectural Engineering Chicago 

nior Invitation Committee ; Chairman < Senior Spaulding Guild 

Memorial Committee; Major in University Bri- 
gade (4) ; Vice President Junior Class ; Prelimi- 
nary Honors. // 7|\ V ^ X ^ll 



/Charles Edward Koch 
Harry Farrar Knappenberger, *rA Mechanical Engineering 

Architecture Macomb 

Scarab. 



Danville 






Harvey Charles Koch 
Edward Franz Knemeyer, APX Mechanical Engineering Cloquet, Minnesota 

Architecture Mason, Nevada Senior Invitation Committee. 




The gods azvakc to the sound of his ponderous footsteps. — Knappenberger. 




Carrie Adelaide Kromer 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Gregorian Literary Society. 



George Lane Kyle, TP.n, II KN 
Elgin Electrical Engineering Chicago 

Electrical Engineering Society. 



Grace Etheridge La Erenz, AaA, <I>A>I' 

Otto Arthur Krueger , „ . D , „ 

, „ . . „ ,, n , , ,. Liberal Arts and Sciences Bushnell 
Architectural Engineering South Bend, Indiana 



Wilfred Henry Kuhn, Triang 
Civil Engineering 

Advertising Manager of The Siren 




Lor is James Laskin 



Chicago 



Irma Ada Latzer, r<t>B, ON 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Highland 
John Christian Kuhns, TKE Woman's Athletic Association; Class Basket- 

Electrical Engineering Argenta | ia u (I)] ( 2 ), (3), (4); First Cabinet Y. W. C. 

Electrical Engineering Society. A. (3), (4); Manager Stunt Show (3). 




Nokomis, the beautiful leader oj the stunt show.— I.atzkk. 




Edward George Lauteebach Gertrude Emma Lehman 

Agriculture Bushnell Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Military Ball Committee (3); President Flori- 

cultural Club (4). Household Science Club. 



Berne, Indiana 



Mary Maria Lawson, AXJJ, <I>A4' 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Sidney Carl Helge Samuel Lekberg 

Treasurer Gregorian Literary Society; Social Electrical Engineering Chicago 

Committee Y. W. C. A. (3), (4); Second Cabi- Electrical Engineering Society; Class Football 

net Y. W. C. A. (4); Geneva Club; President ^ . clags Basketball; Class Raseball (3). 
Senior Illinae; Entered from Illinois Woman's 
College. 



'/I*\ x _ 



Bradley Cleaver Lavvton, $Y^ 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Journalism Chicago 



Gladys Adeline Leonard 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Savanna 



Arthur Bowen Leavens, SX 
, , . , _ . . William Nathan Leonard 

Architectural Engineering . . 

Kansas City, Missouri Agriculture Anna 

Scarab; Shomeez Club; Gridiron Dancing Club; Egyptian Club; Military Band (1), (2), (3) 

Architectural Club; Class Basketball. 



(4) ; Business Manager Band (4). 







For he by geometric scale was wont to sice the pots of ale.— Leavens. 




Roland Eugene Leopold, A2* Curtis Roy Light, 2AE 

Law Belleville Civil Engineering Brook, Indiana 



Egyptian Club; Class Swimming (2), (3); 
Class Baseball (1). 



Ku Klux ; Indiana Club ; Pan Hellenic Council ; 
Freshman Varsity Baseball; Varsity Baseball (2), 
(3) ; Board of Editors of 1913 Illio; Sophomore 
Emblem Committee; President of Class of 1913 
(3). 



Arthur Charles Leverenz 
Mechanical Engineering 

Member of Student Branch of A. S. 
(4). 



Thurlow Girard Lewis 



Law 



Elgin Silas Carl Linbarger, <J>K 

(2), Ceramic Engineering Champaign 

Motorcycle Club; Class Baseball (1), (2), (4) ; 
Manager (3) ; Ceramics Club. 

lovis Ward Lincoln, Iris, TBLT 
Mechanical Engineering Rock Falls 

Benton Captain in the University Brigade. 



Tu Hung Liang 

Agriculture Canton, China 

Chinese Students' Club ; Cosmopolitan Club. 



George Isadore Lindberg 
Mechanical Engineering Princeton, Michigan 

Student Branch A. S. M. E. ; University Band 
(1), (2), (3), (4). 




Much may be nnu!,- 0] a Dutchman, if he be caught viwuw. Linbarger. 




Ida Hubbard Lindley 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Urbana 

Junior Illinae Play Committee (3) ; Vice Presi 
dent Jamespnian Literary Society (3) 
League Advisory Board (4). 



Woman's 



Fern Marguerite Loing, Achoth, *A* 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Bclvidere 

Athenian Literary Society; Y. W. C. A.; En- 
tered from Northwestern University. 



George Heath Lindsey, Acanthus 
Electrical Engineering Saint Louis, Missouri 

Electrical Engineering Society ; Junior Smoker 
Committee. 



Joseph Charles Longueville, *K* 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 

Dubuque, Iowa 

Scarab; Entered from Leland Stanford Uni- 
versity. 



"aris Ff 



1 — 1 J ///|-\W 

Hilah Jane Link, KAG 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Paris Fred Gunard Lundgren 

Mask and Bauble; Member of Senior Council; Mechanical Engineering Chicago 

Woman's Athletic Association; Second Cabinet American Society of Mechanical Engineers; 

Y. W. C. A. (3) ; Cast of "Higher Up". Senior Smoker Committee; Entered from Y. M. 

C. A. College, Chicago. 






Thomas Harold Lloyd, 211 



Girard 



Agriculture 

Hoof and Horn Club; Manager Class Football 
(4); Agriculture Baseball (3). Agriculture 



Roy Simeon Lundin, XA 



Chicago 




Is she not passing fair? — Link. 




Law 



Ray Timothy Luney 



Richard Dana Lyman 
De Kalb Agriculture Chicago 

Agricultural Club; Hoof and Horn Club; Hor- 
ticultural Club; Country Life Club; Illinois So- 
ciety of Agronomy; Ag Round-Up Committee 
(3). 



Edgar Emmanuel Lungren, SX 
Chemical Engineering Aurora 

Entered from University of Chicago. 



Charles Hartman McCauley, XA 
Irchitccture Chicago 

Architectural Club ; Soph 3more Vice President. 



Harry Bruce McClugage 
Robert Stookey Lutz, Afi Liberal Arts and Sciences, Chemistry Peoria 

Electrical Engineering Decatur Freshman Varsity Water Polo; Varsity Water 

Polo (2), (3), (4). 






Carrie Lucile McColley, r*B, ON 

_ _ T Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Lewis Thornton Lyman Shelbyville 

Agriculture Kapaho, Puna, Hawaii Advisory Board Woman's League; Mathemat- 

Agricultural Club; Class Baseball (i), (2), (3). ics Club. 




Thesi men dj inward lights are wont to turn thtir optics in upon't. -McClugage. 




V 



Guy Ennis McGaughey, *AA 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Laiv Lawrenceville 
Innes of Court; Comitatus ; College Dancing 
Club; Class Baseball (i), (2), (3), (4) I Illio 
Staff (3), (4) ; Manager of Class Athletics; Ath- 
letic Board of Control; Sjphomore Smoker Com- 
mittee; Home Coming Committee (4). 



Ora McGhee 

Agriculture Harris City 

Agricultural Club; Country Life Club. 



Edna Belle McKee 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Kankakee 

Classical Club; Woman's Athletic Association; 
Class Basketball (1), (2), (3), (4); Class 
Hockey (4). 



John Latimer McKhown, ^T 
Architectural Engineering Chicago 



Timothy Irle McKnight, *AA 
Lazv Oblong 

Chairman Law Smoker Committee (4) ! En- 
tered from McKendree College. 



^ George Burr McMillen, Acanthus, Brs 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Railway 

Transportation Champaign 

Military Band (1), (2), (3), (4); University 
Orchestra (4) ; Railway Club ; Freshman Hon- 
ors ; Preliminary Honors. 

/ k 9 

Earle Steele McPherson, *Ae, TBII 

Mechanical Engineering Highland Park 



Nellie Frances McVey 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Hill City, Kansas 

Gregorian Literary Society; Y. W. C. A. 




Siler and I don't have to run Senior Records.— McKeown. 




Grace Macbeth, MKA 



.1/ 



Henky A. Marbach, Triangle 
Villa Grove civil Engineering Chicago 



Helen Louise Madden, MKA, *A^ 

Music Champaign Margaret Ann Marbold Ar 

Athenian Literary Society; First Cabinet Y. W. LUn , ral Arts and Sciences Greenview 

C A. (3); Advisory Board Woman s League ^ ■ , , XT ,, TT . 

(4); University Orchestra (3), (4); Choral So- Entered from Northwestern University, 
ciety (3), (4). 



August Mader 
Architectural Engineering 




tanner Citv 



Leo Daniel Marquis, ^A. 
Irchitecttire Milford 

Architectural Club. 



Robert Carleton Maley 

Mechanical Engineering Rochclle Sarah Ann Marks, KAIT 

Senior Hat Committee; Senior Smoker Com- Liberal Arts and Sciences Pecatonica 

mittee. Normal School Club. 




They ore a comfortable i<>>iki>in couple. Margarei Marbold. 




Ralph William Marshall Edwin Whitakek Mattoon 

Liberal Arts and Sciences West Chicago Liberal Arts and Sciences Champaign 

Student Volunteer Band ; Philomathean Liter- 
ary Society. 



Frederick August Kuhs Marx, TBII 
Civil Engineering Saint Louis 

Civil Engineering Club. 







Margaret Mildred Mehlhop 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 

Havana 

Normal School Club. 



Glenn Harlow Matteson 
Agriculture Fairfield 

Country Life Club; Hoof and Horn Club. 






Nathan Meltz 
Agriculture New York City 

Agricultural Club; Intercollegiate Socialist So- 
ciety. 



Moline 



John Dwight Mattison, Triangle 

Civil Engineering Oregon George Henry Mengel 

Civil Engineering Club; Military Band (i), Liberal Arts and Sciences, Chemistry 

W^ ( 2 ). Chemical Club; President of Chemical Club (3). 




Sad visaged man, thy face unmask and smile. — Mengel. 




Engineering 



Carl Altgelp Metz 
Civil Engineering 



Onincy 



Tolono 



EUNA VarNEK MlLLlZEN 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Champaign 

Class Basketball (2), (3), (4); Extension Com- 
mittee Y. W. C. A. (3) ; Second Cabinet Y. W. 
C. A. (4). 



Agnes Mabel Milne 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Lockport 
Household Science Club. 
Fred M. Miller 
Mechanical Engineering Albany, Oregon 

B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, Oregon State Grover Ira Mitchell 

College. .,,..,... 

Mcclhimcal Engineering Cornell 

President lllini Motorcycle Club. 



u 



John Harold Miller, Tim 
Electrical Engineering Oak Park 

Ionian Literary Society, Vice President (3); 
Senior Smoker Committee ; Lieutenant ( 3 ) and 
Captain (4) in University Brigade; Preliminary 
1 lonors. 



Albert Richardson Montague, Triangle 
Civil Engineering Chicago 

Philomathean Literary Society ; Junior Coun- 
cilman of Student Union; Y. M. C. A. Board 
n f Directors, Council and Cabinet; Home Coming 
Committee. 




IV hoi private griefs he has, alas, I know not. Menkb. 




5 



Herbert Jackson Moore, 9AX 
Agriculture Chicago 

Varsity Dancing Club. 



Chester Arthur Morgan 
Mining Engineering Dawson 



William Algernon Kingsmill Morket. 
Agriculture Capetown, South Africa 

Cosmopolitan Club ; Agricultural Club : Presi- 
dent of International Agricultural Society of the 
University of Illinois. 



Ralph Leonard Morrell, TBIT 
Civil Engineering Chicago 

Varsity Baseball (3), (4) ; Preliminary Honors. 



Vernon Leslie Morris, 
Architectural Engineering 

Scarab ; Architectural Club ; 
Society. 



Triangle 

Congress Park 
Ionian Literary 



Helen Sinclair Morrison, ON, 4>A^' 
Agriculture, Household Science Joliet 

Household Science Club; Senior Hat Commit- 
Secretary Junior Illinae ; Vice President Se- 
nior Illinae. 

Edward Henry Morrissey, *K, SAX, AK^ 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Champaign 

Comitatus ; Lambkins Club ; Vice President Ben 
Franklin Club; Class Baseball (2); Siren Staff 
(2), (3); Associate Editor Siren (4); Roast 
Editor 1915 Ili.io; Assistant Sporting Editor Daily 
Illini (3) ;' Ili.io Board (1), (2) ; Daily Mini (1). 
(2); Dopesheet Staff (1), (2), (3), (4); Home 
Coming Committee (3); Chairman Sophomore 
Smoker Committee. 

Gladys Ione Moss 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Chicago 

Household Science Club; Woman's Athletic 

Association ; Advisory Board Woman's League 

(4) ; Executive Committee, Chairman Social 

Committee Woman's League (4). 




There is a great difference between razors and wine; one is necessary a 



ml the other isn't.— Ed Morrissey. 




Forrest Hamilton Murray 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 



Mazon 



Preliminary Honors. 



Idris Nelson, Acacia 
Ceramics Canton 

Ceramics Club; A.B. University of Illinois, 1912. 



Randall T. Murrill 
Mechanical Engineering Flat River, Missouri 



AS 



Milton Nels Nelson, Iris 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Chicago 

Glee Club: Philomathean Literary Society ; Uni- 
versity Orchestra; Der Deutsche Verein. 
Flossie Rachel Myers $ e \> 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 

Huntington, West Virginia 

Y. W. C. A.; Jamesonian Literary Society; 
Household Science Club; Woman's Athletic As- Ralph Augustus Nelson, <J>AT __ _ 

sociation; Country Life Club; President of Se- L henncal Engineering Chicago 

wanee Circle. 



Clarence Arthur Nebel 
Agriculture Clinton 

Scabbard and Blade; Class Swimming (3), (4) ; 
Captain in the University Brigade. 



Moses Elmer Newell 
Law Girard 

Masonic Smoker Committee (1), (4). 




Fair, fat, ami of questionable age. — Gladys Moss. 




Florence Edith Neville Carl Ragnar Nilsson 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Kewanee Mechanical Engineering Gothenburg, Sweden 



Rae Crampton Nichols 
Agricgulturc Chicago 

Class Football (4). 






Roe Niver, IIO 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 

North Fairfield, Ohio 

Scabbard and Blade; Lieutenant (3) and Cap- 
tain (4) in University Brigade. 



Walter Lester Nichols, Ben 
Civil Engineering Cincinnati, Ohio 

Shomeez Club; Class Baseball (1) ; Sophomore 
Cotillion Committee ; Sophomore Emblem Com- 
mittee; Homecoming Committee (2). V>i 



7 



Emilie Marie Noack 



Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Chicago 



Peter Jacob Nilsen, TBLT HKN 
Electrical Engineering Arendal, Norway 

Ma-Wan-Da; President Y. M. C. A.; Adelphic 
Literary Society; Captain Illinois Gymnastic 
Team (4) ; Board of Directors of Y. M. C. A. 



Alfred Norberg 
Civil Engineering Urneo, Sweden 

Treasurer Civil Engineering Club. 




Wonder what this old place will be like without me. — Nivbr. 




Wesley Kayler Norkis, X* 
Civil Engineering Chicago 

Civil Engineers' Club; College Dancing Club; 
Senior Memorial Committee; Junior Prom Com- 
mittee; Captain (4) in the University Brigade. 

Arthur Allen Odell, 2X 
Liberal .-Irts and Science's, Business Chicago 

Ma-Wan-Da; Helmet; Freshman Varsity 
Track (1); Varsity Track (2); Varsity Cross 
Country (2); Staff of 1916 Illio; Smoker Com- 
mittee (1), (2), (4); Emblem Committee (2); 
Prom Committee (3): Memorial Committee (4); 
Homecoming Committee (3); General. Chairman 
of Homecoming Committees (4) ; Junior Council- 
man Illinois Union (3) ; President of Illinois 
Union (4). 



Harry Christian Olseng 
Agriculture Chicago 

Agricultural Club; Entered from University of 
Idaho. 



Robert Harold Olson, Triangle 
Architectural Engineering Chicago 

Scarab; Architectural Club; Class Baseball; 
Manager of Senior Class Basketball. 



.v@ 




Irene Balfour Olin, KAII 
Libera! Arts and Sciences Cranston 

Athenian Literary Society; Recording Secre- 
tary of V. W. C. A.; First Cabinet (4) : Prelim- 
inary Honors. 

Anna Margaret Olsen 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Chicago 

American Chemical Society; Spaulding Guild. 



Henry Aki Panhoe 
Railway and Civil Engineering 

Huang Shan, Kwong Tung, China 
Civil Engineering Club; Railway Club. 



Frederick William Panhorst, Triangle 
Civil Engineering i rbana 

Civil Engineering Society. 




, ,;, tes, a few oj we prominent men have hern having a little meal. Art I >dbij . after Ma Wan Da banquet. 




Raymond Webb Parker, IIKN 

Electrical Engineering Champaign 

Electrical Engineering Club; Board of Man- 
agers Electrical Show (4). 




Warren Kinder Parker 
Agriculture Arlington Heights 



Wilma Gay Parks 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Cooperstown 



Norman Bond Patten, Jr., ATQ 
Architectural Engineering Minneapolis, Minnesota 
Scarab; Homecoming Cimmittee (4). 



Charles Roy Patterson, <I'AA 
Law Sullivan 

Comitatus; Law Smoker Committee (3). 



Earle Carleton Peirce 
echanical Engineering Chicago 

Glee and Mandolin Club ; Centro Literario 
Espanol; Push Ball Committee (2). 



Wilbuk Otis Pendarvis, Acacia, SAX 
LJbcral Arts and Sciences, Lazv Media 

Centro Literario Espanol, Treasurer (3), (4) ; 
Normal School Club; Innes of Court; Phibmath- 
ean Literary Society ; Mask and Bauble, Adver- 
tising Manager (4) ; Daily Illini Staff (3) ; Man- 
aging Editor Daily Illini (4) ; Dope Sheet Staff 
(3) ; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (4) ; Cast of "The 
Great Galeoto". 



Marion Louise Percival, KA9 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Champaign 



9 

i 




Here we have an old abusing of God's patience and the King's English. — Pendarvis. 



■ 

f 




Margaret Campbell Perry, AAII 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Joliei 
Household Science Club. 



Ralph Grover Perry, X^, 2T 
Mining Engineering 

Ku Klux Klan ; Staff of the 1915 Illio. 



Joliet 



c\2 



m 



Horace Howard Phelps, ATO 

Agriculture Wells, Michigan 

Entered from Michigan Agricultural College. 



V: 



George Hyde Pike 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Silvis 

Railway Club; Secretary (3), President (4); 
Member of Board of Directors of Y. M. C. A. 

(4). 



John Joseph Pitts, Jr., <J>rA, ArP 

Agriculture Bloomington 

Senior Editor of the 1916 Illio; Business Man- 
ager of Home Coming Program (4) ; A.B. De- 
gree from University of Illinois, 1914. 
Ernest Howard Pool, ATA 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Law Ottawa 

Scabbard and Blade; Innes of Court; Class 
Baseball (1), (2), (.3); Editorial Staff of the 
1915 Illio; Home Coming Committee (4) ; Chair- 
man of Student Union Dance Committee (4) ; 
Major in the University Brigade ; L. A. and 
S. Vice President Illinois Union ; President of 
Rifle Club ; Secretary of Commercial Club ; Rifle 
Team (3). (4). 

Frederick William Postel, BFS, AK^ 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Mascoutah 

Treasurer Illinois Union; Commercial Club; 
Athletic Board of Control; Class Baseball (1), 
U) ; Class Bowling (1), (2), (3), (4); Dope 
Sheet Staff (3) ; Manager of Interscholastic Cir- 
cfls (4) ; Junior Prom Committee; Senior Memo- 
rial Committee; Chairman Home Coming Fi- 
nance Committee. 

Ellis J. Potter, SIT 
Architecture Morrison 

Scabbard and Blade; Crystal Club; Architectu- 
ral Club ; Class Baseball and Track ; Lieutenant 
in the University Brigade. 







If there is any trip more disagreeable than that from Champaign to Danville, it's from Danvill* to Champaign. 

— 1'llEI-PS. 




Emery Vern Potter, 211 
Electrical Engineering Champaign 

Electrical Engineering Society ; Crystal Dancing 
Club. 

Ada Roberta Pugh 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Champaign 

Gregorian Literary Society ; Household Sci- 
ence Club; Y. W. C. A.; Alliance Franc,ais ; Le 
Cercle Franqais. 

Raymond Harry Purdy, IlqsZ* 
Architecture I 'incomes, Indiana 

Scarab; Military Band (2), (3), (4); Univer- 
sity Orchestra (2), (3), (4); Architectural Club; 
Class Track Team (2), (3), (4); Varsity Track 
Squad (2), (3), (4). 

Emma Stine Pursley, *A^ 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Kansas City, Missouri 
Mask and Bauble; Woman's Athletic Associa- 
tion; Illiola Literary Society; Basketball (2); 
Treasurer of Senior Illinae ; Cast of "The Lion 
Rampant". 



Frank Whitcomb Pusey 
Agriculture Fresno, California 

Agricultural Club ; Treasurer Dixie Club ; 
Motorcycle Club; Wrestling Team (1), (2), (3), 
Acting Coach (4). 



■-'-- 3£3aa>_ 



Eugene Robert Rall, Triangle 
Civil Engineering Chicago 

Civil Engineering Club; Society of the Na- 
tional Reserve Corps (4) ; Rifle Club (3) ; Marks- 
man, N. R. A. (3) ; Military Ball Committee (2) ; 
Lieutenant (3) and Captain (4) in University 
Brigade. 

John Holly Rapp 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Fairfield 

Varsity Track Team (3), (4) ; Junior Prom 
Committee; Senior Memorial Committee; Junior 
Councilman Student Union ; Comitatus ; Univer- 
sity Military Band (1), (2), (3), (4); Ionian 
Literary Society. 




My life problem has been to make the university realize that I am an "I" man. — Rapp. 




William Owen Rathfon 
Ceramic Engineering 
Ceramic Club. 



Chicago 



Gratia Jewett Reed, KKT, ON 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 



Warsaw 



Ban kim Chandra Ray 
Electrical Engineering Barisal, Ind- 

Cosmopolitan Club ; Entered from Calcutta 
University, India. 



Charles Henry Rehling, AZ 
Agriculture Waterloo 

Agricultural Club; Hoof and Horn Club, Presi- 
dent (4). 



Allen Barnes Rayburn, <l>rA 
Agriculture Bloomington 

Football Manager (4). 



Julia Elizabeth Renner 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Woman's Athletic Association. 



Urbana 



^zTe®& 



S 



William Thomas Reach 
Electrical Engineering Chicago 

Electrical Engineering Society ; American In- 
stitute of Electrical Engineers ; Assistant Adver- 
tising Manager 1915 Electrical Show; Junior 
Smoker Committee; Senior Invitation Committee. 



Guy Benjamin Reno, <J>AA 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Law Browning 

Times of Court; Ionian Literary Society; Daily 
Tllini Staff (4). 




/ attribute my success in college to buttermilk.— Jerry Kayburn. 




Edna Kerr Rkntchler 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 



Belleville 



Chleo James Jared Rhea, ATP, AE* 
Electrical Engineering Jacksonville 

Junior Prom Committee ; Chairman Senior In- 
vitation Committee. 



Louis Ribback, ZBT 
Agriculture 

Menorah Society. 




Donald Bert Rich, Ben 



Agriculture 



Chicago 



Lenore Richards, AL\ <I>A^I', ON 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Urbana 
Household Science Club; Y. W. C. A.; Presi- 
dent Woman's League (4) ; Delegate to Middle- 
Western Conference for Woman's Self Govern- 
ment. 

Juanita Richardson, KAG, <J>A^ 

Agriculture, Household Science 

Saint Louis, Missouri 
Household Science Club; Woman's Athletic 
Association; President Jamesonian Literary So- 
ciety. 

George Kerns Richmond, ^K*, AK* 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business 

Prophetstown 
Helmet. 

Dorothy Sue Rinaker, XfJ, <i>ASk, ON 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Springfield 
Corresponding Secretary Y. W. C. A. (3) ; 
Vice President Household Science Club (4) ; 
Second Cabinet Y. W. C. A. (4) ; Woman's Edi- 
tor 1916 Illio; Girls' Senior Hat Committee; 
Chairman Senior Council; Treasurer Junior Illi- 
nae. 




So well to know her own that what she willed to do or say, 
Seemed wisest, virtuest, discreetest, best. 

— Juanita Richardson. 




Royal Wayne Ritchey, ^A 
Agriculture Urbana 

Adelphic Literary Society. 



Nannie Baxter Rives 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Rockbridge 

Woman's Athletic Association ; Class Basket- 
ball (i), (2), (3), (4), Captain (2); Hockey- 
Team (4). 

Ruth Robbins, Xfi 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Congress Park 
Alethenai Literary Society ; Household Science 
Club ; Woman's Athletic Association ; Basketball 
(1), (2), (3), (4), Captain (3); Vice President 
Woman's League (4) ; Vice President Woman's 
Athletic Association (4). 



Harry Barrett Rogers, Ben, TBII 
Civil Engineering Oak Park 

President Athletic Association ; Preliminary 



Honors. 



Joseph Fred Rominf. 
Agriculture Atzvood 

Agricultural Club ; Ag Dance Committee (4) ; 
Preliminary Honors. 

Kimball Valentine Root, ATA 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, General Science 

Chicago 
Helmet; Lambkins; Military Band (1), (2), 
(3), (4); Mandolin Club (2), (3); Orange and 
Blue Dancing Club ; Ceramic Club ; Illinois Union 
Dramatic Club (1), (2), (3), (4), Vice President 
(3), (4) ; Cast of "Maid of the Moon" and 
"Prodigal Prince"; Home Coming Smoker Com- 
mittee (3). 



Louis Rosset 
Electrical Engineering 



Chicago 



George Benjamin Ruby, *AT 
Chemical Engineering Yorkville 

Congregational Guild ; University Orchestra 
(2), (3), (4) ; Military Band (1), (2), (3), (4) ; 
American Chemical Society ; Technograph Board 
(3) ; Board Directors Y. M. C. A. (1) ; Prelimi- 
nary Honors. 




Here's 11 medal iimi I presented to mysclj as a token oj my selj esteem, Rooms 




Orlie Rue, Ben, ST 
Mechanical Engineering Mattoon 

Ma-Wan-Da; Varsity Football (i), (2), (3), 
(4) ; Varsity Track (1), (2), (3). 

Earle Underwood Rugg, *A, KAII 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Fitchburg, Massachusetts 

Adelphic Literary Society; Adelphic-Philoma- 

thean Debate (3). 

Max Rukin 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Brooklyn, New York 

Cosmopolitan Club; Railway Club; Inter-colle- 
giate Socialist Society; Commercial Society; 
Fencing Team; Technograph Staff ^3), (4), 
Business Manager (4). 



V/ 



Francis Marie Rutenber, AOn, ^A^, ON 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Champaign 

Athenian Literary Society; Household Science 
Club; Geneva Club; First Cabinet Y. W. C. A. 
(3), (4); Senior Memorial Committee; Senior 
Council. 



Rowland William Ruth, *K* 
Mechanical Engineering Aurora 

Senior Smoker Committee ; A. S. M. E. 



Newman 




ugenia Rutherford, KKr 



Ira Leon Rush 
Architecture Minot, North Dakota 

Congregational Guild; Tribe of the Mini, Vice 
President (4) ; Freshman Varsity Baseball; Var- 
sity Baseball (2), (3), (4). 



Ira Carl Sailor 
Agriculture Cissna 

University Orchestra (1), (2), (3), (4) 
chestra Librarian. 



Park 
Or- 



i 




The paths of glory are enough to make a fellow rave. — Orlie Rue. 







George Washington Salisbury Henry Greeley Sawyer 

Agriculture Astoria Liberal Arts and Sciences Monmouth 

Agriculture Club ; Chairman Membership Com- 
mittee Y. M. C. A. Cabinet. 



Raphael Adelford Samuels 
Electrical Engineering Elgin 

Electrical Engineering Society. 

I >fr ~ * 



Donald Charles Scheele 
iclianical Engineering Elgin 

Senior Smoker Committee; Captain (4) in 
University Brigade. 



Hymen 
Liberal Arts and Scienc 



Schetnitz 
'icnecs, Business Chicago 

Q. Nathan Saperston Commercial Club ; Treasurer Le Cercle Fran- 

Electrical Engineering St. Charles ^ais (2), (3), (4). 



■ 

4 
m 



Marie Savage 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 
Preliminary Honors. 



Urbana 



Philip George Schiesswohl, X<p, AK* 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Chicago 

Vice President Commercial Club (4); Home 
Coming Committee (4). 




A mini I urn crossed with adversity. -Schiesswohl. 




Daniel Charles Schneider 
Mechanical Engineering Urbana 

Senior Smoker Committee; Student Member of 
A. S. M. E. 



Eugene Schobinger, AKE 
Municipal and Sanitary Engineering Chicago 

Ma-Wan-Da; Helmet; Freshman Varsity Foot- 
ball ; Varsity Football (2). (3). U) J Freshman 
Varsity Track; Varsity Track (2); (3), (4); 
Captain Track Team ( 4) ; Varsity Water Polo 
(2). 



Katherine Seaman KKT 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Oak Park 

Yo Ma; Freshman Honors; Senior Council. 



Nathan Cook Seidenberg, ZBT, SAX 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Law Peoria 

Ma-Wan-Da; Law Club; Ben Franklin Club; 
Menorah Society; Philomathean Literary So- 
ciety; Dailv Illini Staff (2), City Editor (3), 
Edit->r-in-Chief (4) ; Illio Staff (2) ; Home Com- 
ing Committee (4); Law Smoker Committee; 
Lieutenant in University Brigade (3) I Law 
Scholarship (2); Preliminary Honors. 



Rudolph Wester Schucker 



Architecture 




Beulah E. Selsam 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Hagerstown, Maryland 



Mount Carinel 



George Freeman Senneff, X* 
Agriculture Rock Falls 

Mildred Scroggin, KET Tribe of the Illini; Sterling- Club; Freshman 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Mount Pulaski Varsity Football; Varsity Football (2), (3), (4). 



I^19B 




He draweth out the thread of his verbosity finer than the staple of his argument.— Seidenberg. 




Ernest Wilfokd Seyster, Acanthus 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Kcmptor 

Cosmopolitan Club. 



Ellis Marsh Shaw, Triangle 
Architectural Engineering 
Scarab; Architectural Club. 




Ray Iris Shawl, Acacia 
Agriculture Peoria 

Ma-Wan-Da ; Agricultural Club ; Hoof and 
Horn Club; Editor-in-Chief of the 1915 Illio; 
Home Coming Finance Committee (4) ; Military 
Band (1), (2), (3), (4). 

Carl Lu Sherman 
Civil Engineering Sandoval 

C. E. Club; Class Baseball (1), (2), (3) ; Class 
Football (2) ; Class Baseball Manager (2) ; Chair- 
man of Junior Smoker Committee ; Senior Memo- 
rial Committee ; Homecoming Committee (4) ; 
Preliminary Honors ; Leader of the Hobo Band 
(4). 



John P. Shields 
Architectural Engineering Washington, Iowa 

Scarab. 



Walter Scott Shively 
Mechanical Engineering Chicago 

Student Branch of American Society of Me- 
hanical Engineers. 



•vN 






TlifeiLL Dean Shonts, SN, AE* 
Railway Transportation South Bend, Indiana 

Railway Club; H. H. Club; Editor of 'What's 
What at Illinois". 



Charles Wheeler Shook, *K2 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 

West Lafayette, Indiana 
Entered from Purdue University. 




The lino of an hour. — Shawl. 




s 



Charles Harmon Shook 
Architectural Engineering 

Sulphur City, Arkansas 
Vice President of Arkansas Club (3), (4). 



Clarence Edgar Sims 
Chemical Engineering Chicago 

Chemical Club ; Gymnastic Team ; Class Swim- 
ming Team. 



Arthur Robert Siebens 
Agriculture Minonk 

Agriculturist Staff (2), (3); Editor Agricul- 
turist (4) ; Ben Franklin Club ; Tribe of the 
Illini; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (2), (3), (4) ; Y. M. 
C. A. Board of Directors (4) ; Adelphic Literary 
Society; Country Life Club; Secretary Agricul- 
tural Club; Hatchet Orator (3); Varsity Foot- 
ball (3), (4); Varsity Track (3), (4); pint 
Staff (2). 

John Mead Silkman, X<i>, **#\ -' 
Mining Engineering Baltimore, Maryland 

Ku Klux; Tribe of the Illini; North Atlantic 
Club; A. S. M. E. ; Freshman Varsity Football; 
Varsity Football (2), (3); Freshman Varsity 
Baseball ; Varsity Baseball (2) ; Sophomore Co- 
tillion Committee; Junior Prom Committee; Se- 
nior Smoker Committee ; Home Coming Com- 
mittee (3). 



^JV'Iaynard Elmer Slater, Acanthus, AZ 
Agriculture Belvidere 

Scabbard and Blade; Military Ball Committee 
(i); Lieutenant (3) and Captain (4) in Univer- 
ity Brigade ; Preliminary Honors. 



</h 



Eliz; 



Music 

Bethany 



ABETH MORREE SMITH 



Circle; Le Cercle Franqais. 



Urbana 



Walter Henry Simon, TBLT 
Architecture Quincy 

Architectural Club, Vice President 



(4). 



Gladys May Smith 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Champaign 

Bethanv Circle ; Class Hockey (4) I Class Bas- 
ketball ; Y. W. C. A. Poster Committee (2), (3). 




If Johnson kept his family from eating eggs by eating them all himself, how does Silkman keep the Chi Pins 

sober? — Yes, but Eddie Block helps him. 





George Walter Smith John Donald Snook, AX2, *AT 

Architectural Engineering Wilbtr, Nebraska Liberal Arts and Sciences Boswcll, Indiana 



Victor Elwin Spencer 
Paul Miller Smith -^culture 

Agriculture Limoin 

Agricultural Club; Class Baseball (2), (3), 
(4) ; Senior Smoker Committee. 

Selden Lewis Stebbens, 3*rA 

Electrical Engineering Chicago 

E. E. Society. Vice Presidenl (3); Christian 

Stewart Tracy Smith, TB^ Science Society, President (2), (3), (4) I Mot ° r n 

Architectural Engineering Rose Hill, Iowa cycle Club, Vice President (3) .Class Baseball 

Volunteer Band for Missions. & '• ^ rreas " rer <3> • , '" 1 ' Ul,k 



Jay Lavenson Stern, ZBT 
Elizabeth Ellis Smoot, MKA Agriculture E. Las Vegas, New Mexico 

Music Fithian Hoof and Horn Club. 




US not so much how hard sou study as what Profs you gtt. S. T. Smith, 




Bert Ludens Sternberg J 

Agriculture Fulton Music 

Agricultural Club; Class Baseball (i), (2), 
(3;. 



Blanche Stipp, MKA 



Champaign 



Vernon Thompson Stevens, ASP 
Law Corpus Christi, Texas 

Innes of Court; Military Band (1), (2); (3), 
(4); Varsity Debating (2), (3), (4); Composer 
of "Let's Go, Illinois", "Illinois Forever", "For 
Good Old Illinois", and "Back Illinois". 



Raymond Devries Stitt 
Electrical Engineering Morgan Park 

Electrical Engineering Society; Entered from 
Beloit College. 



.\\S: 



Earle Henry Stewart, 2T 
Mechanical Engineering St. Louis, 




©\Ol 



Gerald Darfield Stopp 



Liberal Arts and Sciences Plainfield 

Scabbard and Blade; Captain in the University 
Brigade. 



s 



Ira S. Stinson 
Municipal and Sanitary Engineering Champaign 



Earl Boyd Stout 
Mechanical Engineering Elgin 

Student Branch A. S. M. E. ; Fencing Squad 
(1). 




A gushin' child o' nature. — Vern Stevens, 




Robert Leon Strang 
Agriculture 

Agricultural Club; Class Football (2); Class 
Basketball (2), (3), (4); Outdoor Basketball 
(3) ; Senior Smoker Committee. 



Marjorie Sutcliffe 

Antiocli Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Urbana 



Robert Ambrose Strong 
Mining Engineering South Bend, Indiana 



Buford Matthews Stubblefield, Ac 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Chemistry 

Chemical Club. 




Bloomingtnn 



Abel Ross Summers, HKN 
Electrical Engineering Champaign 

Electrical Engineers' Society ; Board of Man- 
agers of E. E. Show (4). 



Perry Jerome Sweeny, TBII, HKN 
ical Engineering Caledonia 

Varsity Gymnastic Team (3), (4); Preliminary 

Honors. 



I r rbana 



Mary Ethel Swick 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Russell Claude Swope, 6AX, Brs, AK^ 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Kankakee 
Ma-Wan-Da; Helmet; Business Staff of the 
Daily Mini (4) ; Assistant Manager of Interscho- 
lastic (3); Manager of the 1915 Interscholastic ; 
Homecoming Committee (4) ; Member of the 
Athletic Board of Control. 




The three seniors who eat out 0) the same dish.—Sworx, Dbakman, Ferguson. 




Shiro Taketa Lillian Catherine Taylor 

Electrical Engineering Hiroshima, Japan Agriculture, Household Science 



K egaunee, Michigan 



Harold Arthur Talbert, $SK, AIM' 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business ^_ 

Garrett, Indiana MlL0 Cornelius Taylor, TBH 

Helmet; Ku Klux ; Onyx Dancing Club; H. H. civil Engineering Chicago 

Club; Pan Hellenic Council; Sophomore Cotillion 

Committee. f&u/^'-^MBS^ --- wV^\ 

(=[3^//i\\il»)S5 



Charles Hawley Tapping 



jlarence Thomas Terril 



Architectural Engineering 



Peoria Law 






Montavilla, Oregon 



Varsity Track Team (2), (3), (4) ; Architectu- 
ral Club. 



y 



Alexander Stephen Tarnoski 
Architectural Engineering Chicago 

Siren Staff; Art Editor 191 1 Illio. 



Dewitt Wesley Thatcher 
Agriculture Saint Charles 

Class Basketball (2); Class Football (4). 




Better be out of the world than out of fashion. — Butch Talbert. 




James Dale Thom, *T 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Sioux City, Iowa 



Robert Ellsworth Thomas, ATfi, 2T, TBn 
Civil Engineering Rockford 

Helmet; Freshman Varsity Baseball; Varsity 
Baseball (2), (3), (4); Home Coming Commit- 
tee (3); Preliminary Honors; President of the 
Tribe of the Illini. 



Itli 



Clara Louise Thorndike, Xfi 

Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Science 

Austin 

Household Science Club. 

Laurence Emerson Thorne 
Agriculture Huntington, Indiana 

Scabbard and Blade; Class Outdoor Basketball 

(3) ; Class Indoor Basketball (2) ; Class Football 

(4) ; Sophomore Smoker Committee ; Lieutenant 
and Adjutant (3) and Captain (4) in the Uni- 
versity Brigade; Manager of Class Outdoor Bas- 
ketball (2) ; Preliminary Honors. 



Henry Winered Thurston, Jr., Acanthus 
Agriculture New Milford, New Jersey 

ESTELLE LENORE THURSTON 

Liberal Arts and Sciences .. Tcrre Haute, Indiana 



Leon Deming Tilton, Ben 

Agriculture, Landscape Architecture 

East St. Louis 

Ma-Wan-Da; U. L. A. S.; Tribe of the Illini; 
Freshman Varsitv Track Team ; Varsity Track 
Team (2), (3), (4); Siren Staff (1), (2), (3); 
Art Editor of Siren (4) ; Illio Art Staff (1), (3), 
(4); Art Editor of the 1915 Illio; Freshman 
Class Track Team Manager; Sophomore Smoker 
Committee; Home Coming Committee (2), (3), 
(4) ; Class President (1). 



Mary Ethel Todd, AXQ 
Liberal Arts and Sciences LaHarpe 

First Cabinet of Y. W. C. A. (3), (4), Corre- 
sponding Secretary (4) ; Basketball (3) ; Junior 
Class Play. 



i 




Th$ fritnd »j Die working girl. — Stung Thomas. 




Irene Towson Bruce Richard Uphaus 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Macon Mechanical Engineering 

Woman's Athletic Association ; Girl's Senior 
Council. 



Chicago 



Charles Leslie Trowbridge 



Agriculture 



Hoof and Horn Club ; Freshman Varsitv Base 



William Laurence Vansant, AKE, ST 
Mechanical Engineering Chicago 

Comitatus ; Assistant President Athletic Associ- 
Crete at i° n (3) J Chairman Junior Prom Committee; 
Home Coming Committee (3), (4) ; Pan Hel- 



ball; Varsity Baseball (3). 



lenic Council (4) ; Junior Councilman Student 
Union (3). 



&"V± 



Mary Luella Trowbridg^, Glenn Pqland VaughaN; Acacia 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Green Valley Libeml Arts and Sciences 



Amboy 



Anna Marie Turlay, AALT 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Clinton Alvin Claude Volk 

Class Basketball (2), (3) (4), Captain (4) ; Civil Engineering Saint Louis, Missouri 

Class Hockey (4) ; Clinton Club. Civil Engineering Club. 




Whose little body lodged a mighty mind. — Duke Vansant. 




IP 

Alexander Wagner, *1'A, AK^ 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business Chicago 

Ma-Wan-Da; Helmet; Ku Klux ; Freshman 
Varsity Football; Varsity Football (2), (3), (4) ! 
Freshman Varsity Baseball; Class Baseball (3), 
(4) ; Freshman Smoker Committee. 



William Andrew Wagner 
Civil Engineering Champaign 

Civil Engineers' Club; Class Basketball (3), 
(4)- 



John Sawyer Walker 
Architecture Aurora 

Architectural Club; Cast of "The County Chair- 
man" (2) ; Arch. Club Plays (2), (3), (4). 




Dorothy Keziah Walkerly 
and Sciences, Business 



i'rbana 



James Butler WainwrightX, 
Mechanical Engineering Winchester 

Class Baseball (3). 



Frank Emil Walser 

Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Brooklyn, New York 

Cosmopolitan Club; Adelphic Literary Society; 



President of the French Club; Agricultural Club 
Uiola- Adelphic Play (3). Entered from St. 



Carle Capron Walker 



Agriculture 



Clinton 



Paul's School London, England and Neuchapel 
College, Neuchapel, Switzerland. 



Harvey Henry Walters, ^T 
Architecture Beach, North Dakota 

Scarab; Onyx Dancing Club; Architectural 
Club (1), (2), (3), (4)- 




.v,. curses all Eve's daughters of what complexion so ever.— Dutch Wagner. 




Ralph Waldo Walworth 
Agriculture 

Country Life Club; Horticultural Club. 



Jane Coulson Watson 
Urbana Liberal Arts and Sciences Champaign 



Mamie Lawrence Ward, ■MSt', KALI 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Chicago 

Athenian Literary Society ; Vice President Y, 
W. C. A. ; Woman's Senior Council ; Advisory 
Board Woman's League. 

Earle Eugene WarneriH 
Electrical Engineering '. Manito 

Electrical Engineering Society ; Student Mem- 
ber A. I. E. E. ; Electrical Show Committee. 



George William Watts, TBLT 
Mechanical Engineering Urbana 




arry Edwin Webber, ^T, AAS 
. Jiitectural Engineering Chicago 

Ma-Wan-Da ; Scarab ; Engineering Vice Presi- 
dent Student Union ; Ben Franklin Club ; Pan 
Hellenic Council ; Business Manager Dope Sheet 
(3) ; Business Manager Siren (4) ; Sophomore 
Smoker Committee ; Junior Cap Committee ; Home 
Coming Committee (3), (4). 



Charles Sidney Washburn 

Electrical Engineering 

Lenox Dale, Massachusetts Helen Waller Webber, *BK 

Cosmopolitan Club; Electrical Engineering So- Liberal Arts and Sciences Urbana 

ciety. Athenian Literary Society; Preliminary Honors. 




Some men are born rich, some work to achieve riches, and a jew arc business managers of lite Siren. 

Harry Weber. 




Eva Sara Weilepp, AXft 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Decatur 

Entered from James Milliken University. 



Clyde Frederick Weingartner, XB 
Architectural Engineering Rockford 

Architectural Club; Class Football (3), (4); 
Chairman of Senior Smoker Committee ; Military 
Band (4); Class Secretary (3). 



Fred Sheaff Wells, AKE, ST, AAS 
Mechanical Engineering Aurora 

Ma-Wan-Da; Ku Klux Klan ; Ben Franklin 
Club; Freshman Varsity Football (1) ; Varsity 
Football Squad (2), (3) ; Class Track Team (1)"; 
Business Manager 1915 Illio ; Senior Memorial 
Committee ; Homecoming Committees : Programs 
(3), Chairman Enthusiasm Committee (4) ; Busi- 
ness Staff of 1916 Illio. 



Marjorie Cecilia Welsh 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Science 
Entered from Knox College. 



Bradford 



Roger Thomas Welsh, Z*-, AZ 
Agriculture Rockford 

Freshman Varsity Track Team (1) ; Varsity 
Cross Country Team (2) ; Preliminary Honors. 

Vera Wessels, Xfi 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Quincy 

. Der Deutsche Verein ; Woman's League; Uni- 
versity Choral Society. 

Benjamin Wham, <I>A$, A2P 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Law Cartter 

Ma-Wan-Da; Adelphic Literary Society; Egyp- 
tian Club; Innes of Court; President of Board 
of Oratorj- and Debate (4) ; Freshman Varsity 
Track ; Illinois Magazine Staff (4) ; Manager of 
Star Course (4) ; Junior Smoker Committee ; 
Chairman of Accommodation Committee at Home 
Coining (4) ; Class Secretary (2) ; Preliminary 
Honors; Varsity Debate (3), (4) ; Class Debating 
Teams O), (2) ; Philomathean-Adelphic Debate 
(2). 

Russell Claire Wheeler 
Mechanical Engineering Champaign 

Junior Smoker Committee ; Senior Invitation 
Committee. 




Why didn't you give us yow full name, I ittt— Vera Anna Margaretta Gretchen Wessels. 




Thomas Kenneth White, II KX 
Electrical Engineering Champaign 

Electrical Engineering Society. 



James Cameron Whitelaw, K2 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Ceramic Engineering 

Glencoe 
Ku Klux ; Pan Hellenic Council (4) ; Gridiron 
Dancing Club; Ceramic Club; Class Baseball (1), 
(2), (3), (4) ; Class Swimming (3), (.4) ; Golf 
Team (3); Senior Memorial Committee; Home 
Coming Committee (3), (4) ; President Junior 
Class. I^M 




Hortense Elaine Wickard, KA9% 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Garland City, Arkansas 



Clarence Clinton Wiedling, *2K 
Electrical Engineering Chicago 

Freshman Varsitv Football. 



Elon Gilbert Wilkinson, 2X 

Liberal Arts and Sciences Geneseo 

University Military Band (1), (2), (3), (4). 

Laura May Wille 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Enid, Oklahoma 

Der Deutsche Verein. 

Edward Allan Williford, at. Tlill, IIKX, 2T 
Electrical Engineering E. St. Louis 

Electrical Engineering Society, Vice President 
(3); Students' Volunteer Band; Freshman Var- 
sity Basketball; Varsity Basketball (2), (3), (4), 
Captain (3); Sophomore Emblem Committee; 
Sophomore Cotillion Committee ; Chairman Ju- 
nior Cap Committee; Junior Prom Committee; 
Senior Memorial Committee; Home Coming Com- 
mittee (3) ; Chairman Home Coming Arrange- 
ments Committee (4) ; Freshman Class Presi- 
dent; Vice President Student UniDn (4); Pre- 
liminary Honors; Pan Hellenic Council (3), (4) ; 
Mini Publishing Company (3), (4). 

William Webb Wilson, ^A, AZ 
Agriculture Brozvnstown 

President Agricultural Club ; Hoof and Horn 
Club; Ag Dance Committee (4). 




He who falls in love with himself will have no rivals. — Williford. 




Orion Wing, Acacia 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Education Capron 

Psychology Club; Social Science Club; Secre- 
tary Normal School Club (4) 
Dekalb Normal. 



Mabel Clara Womacks 
Liberal Arts and Sciences 



Entered from 




Lenora Mary Worcester, Achoth 
fral Arts and Sciences Genoa 

Kern Illinois State Normal School. 



Charles Prior Winters, Iris 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Business 

President Phibmathean Literary Society (4) ; 
Varsity Golf Team (3) ; Manager May Festival 
(3) ; Board of Oratory and Debate [£fcf<>^ 

George Orlando With, Tria.ngJa -v\ / /l*\ ftlwjw Anthony Wright, AT, ArP 

Municipal and Sanitary EngineeringV^X^^ftm A&tncullflci Shelbyville 

Assistant Business Manager 191 5 Illio; Military Tribe of the Illini; Freshman Varsity Track; 

Ball Committee (3); Junior Prom Committee; Varsity Track (3), (4); Varsity Cross Country 
Sophomore Emblem Committee; Chairman Senior Team (3), ( 4 ). 
Hat Committee; Home Coming Committee (4). 



Viola Esther Wolfe, ^A^ 
Liberal Arts and Sciences Urbana 

First Cabinet Y. W. C. A. (3), (4); Senior 
Council; Secretary Senior Illinae; Preliminary 
Honors. 



Wallace Wyman, *KS^ 
Architecture Mansfield 

Scarab ; Glee and Mandolin Club. 




For every why he hath a wherefore.— Wihtms. 




Florence Yoch, KKT William Walter Zieman 

Agriculture Santa Anna, California Chemical Engineering Chicago 



Anthony Urban Zimmerman 
echanical Engineering Peoria 

merican Society of Mechanical Engineers. 






Ruth Elizabeth Young 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, Household Scienc, 

Casey 
Household Science Club; Entered from Illinois 
Woman's College. /Gy*^ « 

/w/ --" »* 

Roy Richard Zipprodt, Triangle 

Architectural Engineering Urbana 

Scabbard and Blade; Congregational Guild; 

Clyde Charles YounglovV^\ / /"'." Architectural Club; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet and 

Architectural Engineering Sioux City, Iowa Council (3), Board of Directors (4); Lieutenant 

Congregational Guild; Architectural >%; 00 and Ca P tain (4) in the University Brigade. 



Harry Moyer Zeter 
Agriculture 

Illinois Society of Agronomy. 



Lincoln 



James Edward Zollinger, HKN 
Electrical Engineering Polo 

Electrical Engineering Society; Treasurer of 
Junior Class ; Student member A. I. E. E. 







We want girls' dormitories because we need protection. — Florence Yoch. 



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CLASSES 



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LINCOLN 




GEORGE 


KOCH 




WHEELER 


FOGG 


KNAPP 


RHEA 


HUSBAND 


REACE 


BOW 



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R. M. Husband, President 
C. J. Rhea, Chairman 



H. C. Koch 
W. T. Reace 
C. W. Lincoln 
R. C. Wheeler 



A. K. Fogg 
L. G. George 
L. C. Bow 
L. D. Knapp 



124 




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CLASSES 




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KEESE 



STRANG SCHEELE 

SMITH HERMANN STRONG 

FRAYER MILLER HUSBAND 



LUNDGREN SACKRISON 

SILKMAN LUTZ RUTH 

WEINGARTNER SCHNEIDER 



DUBIN 



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Old 


Ar 


MORY 






Decembei 


i 1914 




R M Husband 








President 


C F Weingartner 








Chairman 


J. H. Miller 








D. S. Frayer 


R. L. Hermann 








H. Dubin 


C. E. HUNGERFORD 








D. C. Schneider 


A. W. Keese 








F. G. Lundgren 


D. C. SlIEELE 








R. A. Strong 


R. W. Ruth 








R. C. Maley 


J. A. Sackrison 








A. A. Odell 


P. M. Smith 








R. W. Marshall 


R. L. Strang 








J. M. Silkman 




R. 


S. Lutz 





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Awry<5. 

CLASS OFFICERS 

First Semester 

Dudley W. Crane President 

Stanley Hansen Vice-President 

E. W. Noxon Secretary 

R. Rea Brown Treasurer 

E. A. Nordstedt Sergeaiit-at-Arms 

Second Semester 

Charles W. Wray President 

David W. Burgoon Vice-President 

Evelyn Gehant Secretary 

Edwin A. Bebb Treasurer 

W. L. Roiilfing Sergeant-at-Arms 

Mordbtcdt - 
First Sk.u ester ( )ffi< ers 

126 

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CLASSES 



3Jwmar Class Crnnmitiees 

3)umur jjmnn (Emmmtte 

R. E. Denz Chairman 

Laura Hirtii A. W. Robinson 

Fern Harris J. K. Barber 

Grace Mitchell J. C. Grabbe 

Lillian Thompson F. H. Sutton 

W. W. Hart J. M. McKeon 

H. J. Huntington L. R. Lumley 

W. H. Beal E. F. Pruett 

F. Bebb W. C. Peterson 
R. H. Brooks W. L. Rohlfing 

G. Curtiss A. E. Mealiff 
W. Beaubien J. W. Shoemaker 
F. Miller J. Frier 

Junior Smoker (Committee 

R. H. Klamt Chairman 

R. A. Scott E. A. Bebb 

I. T. Brandon D. F. Heath 

W. H. Hough D. M. Glover 

H. F. Atteberrv E. N. Owen 

L. E. Minnis C. H. Jackman 

R. L. Moses W. E. Savage 

L W. Laws G. W. Bristow 

R. A. V. Swanson H. Lumley 

Junior Gkp (Eommiite 

W. H. Beal Chairman 

W. B. Bethel John Frier 

Raymond Brooks J. P. Haskell 

R. E. Denz C. W. Wray 

S. Hansen G. W. Renwick 

H. M. Lumley W. M. Sutherland 

L. W. Reese Frank Sutton 
Herbert Helm 



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CLASS OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

Tom Browning President H. W. McCoy 

R. E. Polk Vice-President. F. Leggitt 

J. M. KNAppENBERGER..Secretary (No elections) 

Carson Crofts Treasurer 



\ 



#tfpijamiir£ (ilrmtmittees 

COTILLION COMMITTEE 

Cunningham 

S. J. Thomas Ernest Gay 

F. R. Babcock Gordon Otto 

Ralph Newlin J. K. Stringer 
Paul Heineke LewisW.Woltman 
SMOKER COMMITTEE 

C. W. BORTON 



S. R 
J. L. Kohn 
Donald R. Mofeett 
E. C. Hopkins 



E. T. Mackie 
Arthur Gilbert 
H. W. McCoy 
A. E. Kern 



William Everham F. M. Graves 
L. W. Chalcraft F.'E. Cavette 
C. S. Palmer H. A. Kirisy 



Chairman 

Scott McNulta 
C. W. Reuling 
E. T. Colton 



....Chairman 
A. L. Graven 
F. LI. Gantz 
Valentine Dupre 



SCRAP COMMITTEE 

R. M. Chittenden. 

H. D. Kiner D. A. Hills 

Paul Whitehead Harry Quick 
Dwight L. Mink G M. Cullinane 
T. T. Lewis C. H. Burgston 

H. L. Ford 

JUNIOR CAP 

J. H. Kasbeee 

C. E. Turner C. R. Coultas T. S. Browning 

E. C. Hopkins F. E. Cavette L. V. Cope 

E. II. Gay W. C. Savage H. W. Markwardt 

L. Smith 



C. B. Dick 
I. H. Cryder 
H. W. Day 
H. M. Martin 

COMMITTEE 



Chairman 

G. C. Darrell 
G. M. Gehant 
Carson Crofts 
Paul Becker 



Chairman 

G. Otto 

F. T. Mackie 

H. W. Day 




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P* 1 "* 0, CLASS OFFICERS 

V, Second Semester 

First Semester President J- I- McKnight 

Fred D. Ball president J 

v n Ffttkr Vice-President . 

G E Witty :::::..... Secretary (No other elections 

(j. il. vviui.. Trpasurer made^ 

Lawrence Winters lieasuiei 

B. F. Bleuer Sergeant-at- Arms 

CLASS COLORS COMMITTEE 

,r Chairman 

Marion liAiu .__ M/VpnN Edward Richardson 

Row en a Kohl *->. k. iviakiun 

L. Borucki 
CLASS EMBLEM COMMITTEE 

F. C. Kalthoff » -Chairman 

W B. Hostetler John Femley R. S. Reading 

S D Petty Philip Schloss Francis Hardie 

Lawrence Winters J. W. Rollo Roy Kroeschel 

W. T- Alcock 
ATHLETIC MANAGERS 

G H R\nney Manager Class Athletics 

George Snyder Football Manager 

F S Storey Baseball Manager 

W. F. Burke Basketball Manager 





Jkttxttxtics 




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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 




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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 

•program 

Friday, November 13, 1914. 



1 



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2:30 p.m. — Junior- Sophomore class Football Game, Class championship — 

Illinois Field. L 

3 :oo p. m. — Parade of the Senior Hobo Band. 
6:45 p.m. — Hand Concert and Mass Meeting, Auditorium. 
8:15 p. m. — Alumni Smoker — Old Armory. 
8:30 p.m. — Mask and Bauble. "Our Wives", Illinois Theater. 

Saturday, November 14, 1914. 
9:00 a.m. — Freshman-Sophomore Sack Rush, South Campus. 
10:00 a.m. — Cross Country Run; Start and Finish at Illinois Field. 
10:30 a.m. — Reception to Women Visitors, Woman's Building. 

— Meeting of the Executive Committee of the Alumni Association. 
11:00 a.m. — Mawanda Meeting. 

2:30 p.m. — Football Game: Chicago vs. Illinois, Illinois Field. 
4:30 p.m. — Alumni "Round-Up". 
8:15 p.m. — Mask and Bauble — "Our Wives", Illinois. 

Sunday, November 15, 1914 
1 :30 to 5 :oo p. m. — Chrysanthemum Show, Floricultural Gardens. 

Homecoming. Committees 

Program Committee — L. G. George, '15, chairman; W. H. Goelitz, '15 
W. K. McCracken, '16; W. L. Schleuter. '16; J. J. Pitts, '15; R. M. Husband, '15 

Arrangements Committee — E. A. Williford, '15, chairman; H. E. Webber 
'15 ; E. C. Pool, '15 ; F. A. DuHadway, '15 ; A. E. Fogg, '15 ; W. C. Armstrong, '15 

Finance Committee — F. W. Postel, '15, chairman; ]. W. Freels, '16; J. C 
Whitelaw, '15; Ray Shawl, '15; W. B. Erwin, '15; W. F. Anderson, "15; D. O 
With, '15; John H. Rapp, '15. 

Advertising Committee — N. C. Seidenberg, '15, chairman; E. S. Kreigh, '16; 
W. W. Hart, '16; R. B. Bronson, '16; S. D. Kirkpatrick, '16; F. H. Williams, '16; 
J. L. Block, '17; J. H. Ticknor, '17. 

Accommodations Committee — B. E. Wham, '15, chairman; N. Patton, '15; 
L. T. Hill, '15; W. L. VanSant, '15; W. E. Krebs, '16; C. C. Gamble. '15; E. J. 
Block, '16; O. J. Murray, '16. 

Smoker Committee — L. D. Tilton, '15, chairman; N. Lawnin, '16; R. C. 
Glover, '15; W. Crutchfield, '15; C. M. Ferguson, '15; Carl Sherman, '15; 
J. L. McKeown, '15; E. J. Gehrig, '15. 

Steering Committee — J. C. Hostetler, '15, chairman; A. B. 1 lammitt, '15; 
L. D. Knapp, '15; N. A. Wright, '15; E. Shelby, '16; L. C. Hohman, '16; 
O. Lansche, '16; G. E. McGaughey, '15. 

Decorating Committe — R. C. Swope, 'is, chairman; II. ]. Kircher. '15; 
If. F. Cogdall, '15; E. Billman, '16; V. Dobbins, '15; W. Beaubein, '16; A. W. 
Carlson, '15; E. Pruett, '16. 

Enthusiasm Committee — F. S. Wells, '15. chairman; J. 1'. Crebs, '15; P. 
Scheisswohl, '15; W. I lough. '16; L. R. Lumley, '16; II. A. Almond, '16; R. L. 
Moses, 'l6. 

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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 




Crowd on the East Bleachers. 

Never before has the University of Illinois seen a Homecoming like that of 
1915. It was a Homecoming in fact as well as in name. From every corner of 
the globe, from the north, south, east and west, from the oldest grad to the 
senior of 1914, they came. Mothers, fathers, sisters and sweethearts packed the 
trains to the platforms and even special trains were required to bring the mighty 
throng of visitors and Homecomers. 

The fates and the gods were with us. We were favored with a football team 
that had taken the first long strides towards the championship of the west, and 
the holder of that title would be the winner of that momentous game. To win 
meant the beginning of a new era in Illinois football. To lose meant the return 
to gridiron oblivion from which we had so long struggled to arise. 

Not only was a football title at stake but the Homecoming itself was in the 
hands of fate. The Illinois Student Union financed it and left nothing undone to 
make it long remembered and never to be forgotten. The game did the rest. 

Homecoming was a success and the biggest success in its history. Nine thou- 
sand grads and visitors came back to view the progress of their Alma Mater. 
Old grads, separated for years, renewed acquaintanceships and friendships that 
were dear to them in days gone by and dearer now in their renewal. The students 
threw their doors wide open and displayed a generous hospitality that warmed 
the hearts of all. Every minute of the days were filled. Nothing was found 
wanting or undone and the team exceeded the wildest hopes and dreams of the 
most enthusiastic rooter. A championship was won on Illinois field in the most 
thrilling game ever staged by the Illinni. 

Homecoming came and went, but with it came and stayed in the hearts of 
every Alumnus and undergraduate a deep and growing love and respect for our 
Alma Mater. 



135 



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"Bo" 

while the hand 

After this 
hurst of riotou 
truly prophetic 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 

fjolro ^ctitb 

At the call of the wild, weird and ridiculous the Seniors 
arose from their stately lethargy, threw off their proverbial 
dignity, and arrayed themselves in the motley rags of the 
Knights of the Ties. The disguise was complete. After 
passing in grand review before these dignitaries, namely 
"Shorty" Dubin and "Shorty" Sherman, and scouring 
the town for unfaithful Boes, the discovery of whom 
was met with yells of glee, and a sacrifice to the god of 
yellow paint, the army of tramps marched to Illinois Field, 
led by a band that astonished the listeners by its ability to 
play real music. 

A lady hobo, attired in an X-ray skirt, was so annoyed 
by mashers that she was forced to appeal to the protection 
of the police. A creature attired as half man and woman, 
danced and flirted with itself, while an "old does" man 
performed bareback feats on a long-eared horse. The latest 
shipment of Belgian orphans clamored for milk which was 
fed to them in brown bottles. The Siamese triplets giggled 
with delight at seeing Chicago's goat burned on the altar 
played the saddest of music. 

solemn and sacred ceremony the band broke out in a hilarious 
s music, while the hoboes danced and howled in their final orgy, 
of the coming victory. 



3ltttiT~flIks5 (Kljampionsljip JFootball (Same 



Before this varigated crew 
Jay" band the class of 1916 
pionship for the third time in 
and now as juniors they have 
iron, a feat never equaled by 

This year it was the soph 
and they fell to the score of 
to end and displayed a finish 
of championship class. 



of tramps and the syncopated strains of the "Blue 
romped away with the Interclass Football Cham- 
the history of the class. As freshmen, sophomores 

been undisputed champions of the interclass grid- 

any other class. 

omores' turn to give way to the onslaught of '16 
15 to 12. The game was exciting from beginning 
in the gridiron art that is attained only by teams 




*atai 



Sophomore-Junior Game. 
137 

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DIVERSITY ACTIVITIE S 



■*■! 




The Start. 



Htk Jiusl) 



For two long months the Freshman and Sophomore tribes of the Illini had 
been straining at the leash and bitter enmity between the classes demanded 
satisfaction in battle. ' , , 

When the day of strife dawned the warriors were up before the sun and 
their wai : whoops and battle cries rallied the sleeping braves to their colors. 
\t the crack of the pistol the air was rent with gory battle cries as the blood- 
thirsty armies charged each other. All the pent-up rage, hatred and fury of a 
generation was let loose in that biting, beating and tearing struggle The battle 
was fast and furious and the Frosh fought desperately, only to be overcome, 
routed and trampled on by the insatiable Sophs. 




Awaiting for the Struggle, 



138 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 




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3lllinoia 21 — (Slljitagfl 7 

When Harold Pogue dived between the goal posts for the first touchdown, 
when seventeen thousand howling, football mad Jllini jumped to their feet and 
yelled till their throats refused to give out another sound, a new page was 
turned in the history of Illinois. That day, marked by a thousand thrills that 
touched the heart of every loyal alumnus and undergraduate, marked the begin- 
ning of a new era. On that day Illinois came into her own and came to stay. 

It was only a football game. But a game that will never be forgotten, for 
it stamped itself on the mind and heart of every man who loves his Alma Mater. 

It was football, not luck nor a jinx, but pure, unadulterated football that 
pushed Pogue and Clark across the line, that guided the ball from the toe of 
Macomber. It was Football that turned a page in history and marked it — 
ILLINOIS FOREVER. 




Pogue's Disputed Touchdown. 



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3lntersclialci5ttr 




R. C. Swope 
Manager of 1915 
Interscholastic 



UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 

|lroj*ram 

Stomity-^ertmb Annual Intersdjolastk 

Thursday, May 14 

600 p.m.— May Day Festival, 
Illinois Field. 

8:00 p.m.— Girls' Stunt Show, 
Auditorium. 

Friday, May 15 

9 130 a. m. — Interscholastic Ten- 
nis Tournament, 
Preliminaries. 

: . 30 p m —Track Meet, Chi- 
cago vs. Illinois. 

3;30 p . m —Baseball, Chicago 
vs. Illinois. 

5 -oo p. m. — Parade of the Uni- 
versity Regiment. 

6 :45 p. m. — Band Concert. 

7 30 p. m.— Interscholastic Ora- 
torical Contest, 
Auditorium. 

8 00 p. m— Glee Club Concert, 
Illinois Theater. 




C. J. Ennis 
Manager of 1914 
Interscholastic 



Saturday, May 16 
o 00 a. m.— Interscholastic Track and Field Meet. 

Interscholastic Tennis Tournament, Finals, 
voo p. m.— Baseball, Northwestern vs. IBmou. 
3-00 p. m,-Awarding of Trophies, Illinois Field. 
7 00 p m.— Interscholastic Circus, Illinois Field. 
9 00 p. m— Cadet Hop, Armory. 




U. of I, Formation 

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^1jj> |tan££ xrf tlje fjrtfurs 



Just at sunset the bleachers of Illinois Field were filled with spectators gathered 
to see the Dance of the Hours. In former years the classes in the gymnasium had 
given a Maypole Dance before their Queen. This year "Illinois Spirit" showed 
"Mere Mortal" the joyous hours of the day. 

With pattering, lifeless step "Mere Mortal" trudges thru the fields,— tired, 
discouraged and dejected. Her own melancholy thoughts engross her attention. 
She does not see the flowers about her, nor even the bird that hops across her path. 
Suddenly she is startled by a strain of mysterious music, and is confronted by 
a beautiful nymph who seems to dance on the very air. She has met with the 
"Spirit of Illinois". However, she will have nothing to do with this joyful spirit. 
She refuses her repeated invitations to dance. Her very joy causes the "Mere 
Mortal" to feel by contrast that life for her is dull and the hours colorless. The 
spirit, pitying such despondency, invites her to mount to the enchanted throne 
from which she can see the beauty of the common hours of the day. 

Wonderingly she hears the music as it ushers in girls dressed in the rosy 
colors of the Dawn; they dance and drive off in their chariots. The hour of 

Sunrise appears with her nymphs of 
radiant hues. There is a roll of thun- 
der, and the Cloud Imps swoop down, 
dancing elfishly as they play with the 
Lightning. But they vanish before the 
prim gray Raindrops. Then there is 
a riot of colors as the Rainbow 
spans the horizon. The hour of 
Noon comes on with its yellow heat 
waves. These brilliant lively Sun 
Nymphs dance up and down, as 
waves of heat upon the hard earth. 
The Winds come with a rustling 
sound, cooling the air as they rush 
to and fro. The hour of Sunset fol- 
lows, with her gorgeous colors ; Twi- 
light, peaceful and mystic ; and deep 
Night with her lighted sparklers 
twinkling like stars. At last the Mor- 
tal, thoroughly awakened to the 
beauty of everything about her dis- 
cards her somber cloak and with the 
Illinois Spirit leads all the hours in a 
gran 1 ensemble. 




Illinois Sfikit. 



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The Girls' Annual Stunt 
Show was given the night of 
May 14. This, like everything 
else connected with the Uni- 
versity of Illinois grows better 
each year. The stunts were 
the pick of a severe compe- 
tition and each and every one 
was well worth seeing. Even 
those who stood in line for 
tickets from eight o'clock on a 
chilly gray morning were fully 
repaid. 

Gamma Phi Beta was 
awarded first place for their 
"Camp of the Senior Illini". It was a modernized Indian farce, full of clever 
local hits and takeoffs on the events of the history of the Senior Class, the chimes, 
the Senior election, and the Illinois Union. One of the most charming parts of 
the stunt was the singing of "The Land of the Sky Blue Waters" by Mary 
Franklin Savage. 

Chi Omega was given second place for their "Jack-in-the-Box," a snappy 
dainty stunt spiced with lots of pep and ginger. At the stroke of twelve, the dolls, 
bewitchingly dressed in pink and blue clown suits, came to life and sliding from 
their seats began to dance. Jack, in the person of Mildred Emmons, sprang from 
his box and floated thru a novel little dance, ending in a series of somersaults. 

Pi Beta Phi in the "University Graveyard" was far from being a "dead one". 
The graves, representing various University events, gave up their occupants who 
then united in a wierd and ghostly resurrection dance. Alpha Xi Delta in "A 
Modern Hiawatha" gave one of the most finished stunts on the program. Amid 
most realistic forest scenes the Indian braves sat about the fires before the 
teepees, reading popular magazines and nibbling "La Vogues", while the ultra- 
modern Hiawatha courted Minnehaha in the style of 1916. 

The "Topsy Minstrels" of Kappa Kappa Gamma, shone and scintillated both 
in their repartee and their variegated costumes. The clog dance by Helen Brown 
scored a big hit. 

The "Fete of the Flowers" 
by Alpha Omicron Pi was un- 
usually novel and attractive, 
being original both in music 
and words. Athenian closed 
the program in "The Survival 
of the Fittest", presenting the 
trials and tribulations endured 
by the student in evading the 
Strptococcus Scarlatina. 

Miss Emma Breidstadt en- 
tertained the audience, while 
waiting for the decision of the 
judges, with the "Wild Bird 
Dance" from the May Fete. 




Chi Omega Clowns 



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(Hlficaju frs* ^Illinois 




On Friday a host of Maroon athletes invaded Illinois Field determined to reap 
the harvests of victory both on the track and on the diamond. Unfortunately 
the Orange and Blue defenders on the cinder path upset their plans, and for the 
fourth consecutive time Illinois became the Dual Meet Champions of the West. 

Three Illinois records were shattered, two Conference records were broken 
and another Illinois record equalled in the brilliant performance of Coach Gill's 
triumphant athletes. For Captain Sanders, Henderson, Burke, Bolander. and 
Butt this was their last performance on Illinois Field, and in great part it was due 
to their efforts that Chicago was allowed to keep but 55 points out of the 126. 

The first Conference record was smashed by Arthur Mason, the sophomore 
wonder, who completed the two-mile grind in the remarkable time of 9:4!^- 
Harold Pogue, another Sophomore, by a leap of twenty three feet one and a half 
inches, gained the honor of breaking the Conference record in the broad jump. 
Fred Hendersen clipped three fifths of a second from the Illinois record for the 
half mile, travelling the distance in 1 :S7 A A- Captain Sanders tried hard to break 
his own record in the quarter, but had to be satisfied with tying his former 

mark of 49-Hi- 

The track meet was hardly over when the rooters began to shift to the base- 
bail bleachers, where the largest Interscholastic crowd ever on Illinois Field saw 
Chicago defeat Illinois by the close score of 4 to 3. The game was full of thrills 
from the moment that Umpire Pickett shouted "Play Ball" until the very end of 
the ninth inning, which found the excited crowd on their feet yelling madly for a 
tying run. Des Jardien, the mighty Maroon giant, pitched a wonderful game for 
Chicago, and allowed Illinois but five scattered hits. Three of these were 
accredited to "Slip" Cogdall, the midget second baseman. Gunkel, who started 
for Illinois was substituted by Hallas in the third inning. "Smoke" pitched 
phenomenal ball, allowing only two hits in the six innings but the damage had 
already been done, for in the second inning the Maroons had taken advantage 
of the few costly bobbles of the Illinois fielders and had scored three runs. The 
Illinois runs came in the first, when Phelps scored on Norgren's error; in the 
sixth, when a three base hit by Cogdall brought in McRobie ; and in the eighth, 
when, through a base on balls, another hit by Cogdall and a passed ball, McRobie 
was again able to cross the plate. 



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Saturday ,morning the stage was turned over to our visitors, — the six hundred 
high school athletes who competed for honors in the Twenty-second Annual 
Interscholastic Meet. Never before had there been so many contestants, so many 
high schools represented, nor the fast track so nearly perfect. 

Cheered on by a large and enthusiastic representation in the bleachers, Uni- 
versity High of Chicago easily won first honors, although threatened at times 
by Oak Park High and Lane Tech. LaGrange, who had but little difficulty in 
maintaining the lead among the smaller schools, was able to almost double the 
points of Harrisburg, its nearest competitor. 

The performances of some of the "prep" stars proved a revelation. Smart, who 
captured i5^points for LaGrange, was the most successful individual point 
winner. Carter, of University High, by winning the two hundred and the two- 
twenty, also merited special attention, while the performance of his team-mate, 
Spink, who won the half-mile in i :59^, was nothing short of phenomenal. Other 
stars were: Husted of Roodhouse, Davis of Centralia, Allman of Urbana, and 
Kirkpatrick of Champaign. 

Ilntosdyulastk ©ratottai ©mttest 

Friday night while the Glee and Mandolin Clubs were holding forth at the 
Illinois, the Interscholastic Oratorical Contest was being held in the Auditorium. 
Ten extemporaneous speeches and five memorized orations were delivered by 
the high school orators. Four of the contestants were young ladies. _ Edward 
Hayes, representing Urbana High School, won the premier event with his oration 
entitled, "The New American Era". Charles Fairman of Alton and Helene Doty 
of New Trier won second and third honors. 

Clark Eichelberg ranked first among the extemporaneous speakers. He dis- 
cussed the first year of President Wilson's administration. Charles Fraser of 
Champaign and Percy Clark of Elgin were second and third. Dean Babcock, 
Professor Ward and Dr. lioyer acted as judges. 

Six of the fifteen who entered the contest returned to the University as 
freshmen last September, It was from these that the strong freshman debating 
team was recruited. This seems to show that the contest has the desired result 
of attracting good public speaking material to the University of Illinois. 



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UNIVERSITY A C T I V I T 1 E S 



Summaries xrf pfrettte rrf ft|c 3(ttferscly(jlasftc iWecf 

(SLIass <A 

ioo yard dash — Carter, U. High, first; Date, Oak Park, second; Deaver, Bloomington, third; 
Hargrave, Joliet, fourth. Time :io^. 

Quarter mile run — Schieverick, U. High, first ; Helme, Springfield, second ; Hugy, Spring- 
field, third; Schields, Crane, fourth- Time .52. 

Broad jump — Kriedler, Oak Park, first; Date, Oak Park, second; Kennedy, Oak Park, third; 
Graham, U. High, fourth. Distance 20 feet 3 inches. 

220 yard low hurdles — May, Lane, first; Sternaman, Springfield, second; Harvey, Oak Park, 
third; Wallace, Oak Park, fourth. Time :28 2 A. 

Half mile run — Spink, U. High, first; Donahue, Freeport, second; Chapeck, Lane, third; 
Jacks, Oak Park, fourth. Time 1 :59j4. 

50 yard dash — Date, Oak Park, first; Deaver, Bloomington, second; Shiverick, U. High, 
third ; Hart, Freeport, fourth. Time :o5^. 

One mile run — May, Lane, first; Neal, Danville, second; Kraft, Oak Park, third; Curren, 
Springfield, fourth. Time 4 :38fi. 

220 yard dash — Carter, U. High, first; Flate, U. High, second; Hart, Freeport, third; 
Deaver, Bloomington, fourth. Time \2^Ys. 

120 yard high hurdles — Hardv, Oak Park, first; Becker, Lane, second; Smith, Decatur, third; 
Wallace, Oak Park, fourth. Time :i6f£ 

12 lb. shot put — Becker, Lane, first; Besta, Crane, second; Sandroff, Lane, third; Gillies, 
U. High, fourth. Distance 44 feet 5 inches. 

Pole vault — Kirkpatrick, Champaign, and Hale, U. High, tied for first ; Graham, U. High, 
third; Kobb, Crane, fourth. Height 11 feet 3 inches. 

12 lb. hammer throw — Allman, Urbana, first; Pike, East Aurora, second; Putnam, Rockford, 
third; Becker, Lane, fourth. Distance 138 feet 3 inches. 

Discus throw — Allman, Urbana, first; Gillies, U. High, second; Becker, Lane, third; Kemp, 

Champaign, fourth. Distance 113 feet 4 inches- 
High jump — Bush, New Trier, and Rider. Springfield, tied for first; Sullivan, U. High, and 

Williams, Quincy, tied for third. Height 5 feet 8 inches. 

Relay — University High, first ; Lane, second ; Crane, third ; Oak Park, fourth. Time 1 134. 

(Elasa ^ 

100 yard dash — Davis, Centralia, first; Stalker, Tuscola, second; Hayden, Momence, third; 
Campbell, White Hall, fourth. Time :io^. 

First quarter mile run — Culbertson, Harrisburg, first ; Gallagher, Kankakee, second ; Mon- 
geig, Sterling Morton, third; Enard, Kewanee, fourth. Time :SA l A- 

Second quarter mile run — Washburn, Kewanee, first ; Melin, West Aurora, second ; Maxfield, 
Greenfield, third ; Roodhouse, White Hall, fourth. Time :$4fyi. 

220 yard dash — Stalker, Tuscola, first; Davis, Centralia, second; Kerrick, Chrisman, third; 
Knight, Beardstown, fourth. Time :22 2 /$. 

Broad jump — Smart, LaGrange, first; Davis, Centralia, second; Motter, Knoxville, third; 
Stalker, Tuscola, fourth. Distance 21 feet 8^4 inches. 

Discus throw — Husted, Roodhouse. first; Troster, Belleflower, second; Jennings, Marseilles, 
third; Webber, Hoopeston, fourth. Distance 124 feet 11 inches. 

First half mile run — Smart, LaGrange, first; Washburn, Kewanee, second; Clarno, Farmer 
City, third; Rick, Morrison, fourth. Time 2:08. 

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QLlass $— J&Ttmmanj of ffcents (continued) 

Second half mile run— Rawlings, Murphysboro, first; Garium, Pittsfiekl, second; Butler, 
Sullivan, third; Brown, Harrisburg, fourth. Time 2:06. 

High jump— Fletcher, Ridge Farm, first; Stickler, Rossville, second; Fey, LaGrange, third. 
Smart, LaGrange, Wade, Oregon, Kemp. Winona, tied for fourth. Height 5 feet 8 
inches. 

Pole vault— Burgess, Fairfield, and Haworth, Georgetown, tied for first; Landers, Oregon, 
and Vohs, LaSalle, tied for third. Height 11 feet. 

Hammer throw— Suthed. Jacksonville, first; Husted, Roodhouse, second; Ebers, Beardstown, 
third; Anderson, Charleston, fourth. Distance 154 feet 7 inches. 

50 yard dash— Hadyen, Momence, first: Davis, Centralia, second; Campbell, White Hall, 
third ; Black, Kankakee, fourth. Time :05^. 

One mile run— Garvin, Pittsfield, first; Xott. LaGrange, second; Rawlings, Murphysboro, 
third; Byers, Harvey, fourth. Time 4:37 3 A- 

120 yard high hurdles— Smart, LaGrange. first; Fey, LaGrange, second; Wade, Oregon, 
third; Parrish, Harrisburg, fourth. Time :i". 

12 11). shot put— Husted, Roodhouse, first; Burgess. Fairfield, second; Malone, LaSalle, third; 
Erp, Chrisman, fourth. Distance 42 feet 11 inches. 

220 yard low hurdles— Fey, LaGrange. first; Parrish, Harrisburg. second; Pierce, Watseka. 
third ; Reynolds, Jacksonville, fourth. Time :28. 

Relay race— Harrisburg, first; West Aurora, second; LaGrange. third; Jacksonville, fourth. 
Time 1 :37- 



Ihttcrscliokstic Jtccorbs anfc fibers 



Event Holder ^ 1 AR 

50 yard dash Borden. Oak Park 1898 

Eckersall, Hvde Park 1903 

May, Rochelle 1905 

Harrison, Crane 1906 

100 van! dash Eckersall, Hyde Park 1903 

220 "yard dash Eckersall. Hyde Park 1903 

440 vard dash Martin, Oak Park 1908 

880 vard dash Spink, University High 1914 

Mile run Noonan, Decatur 191 1 

120 vard high hurdles Schobinger, Harvard 191 1 

220 vard low hurdles Cory, University High 1913 

High jump Doughterty, Biggsville 1900 

Broad jump Lewis. Pittsfield iockS 

Pole vault Foss, University High I9 X 3 

12 pound shot put Byrd, Milford r 9o8 

12 pound hammer throw Berry. Beardstown 1910 

Discus throw Byrd, .Milford 1910 



Record 

:05 2 A sec. 
:oS 2 A sec. 
:0S 2 A sec. 
:0Syi sec. 
:io sec. 
.22 sec. 
: 5 1 4 5 sec. 

I :50+£ sec. 
4:37.' 5 sec. 

:i6 sec. 
■.2$ sec. 
5 ft. 11 in. 
22 ft. 8J4 in. 

I I ft. b-A in. 
40 ft. 10 in. 

166 ft. g'A in. 
130 ft. 5 in- 



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By 6 :j,o Saturday evening ten thousand people had packed the bleachers on three sides 
of Illinois Field, and were impatiently awaiting the grand parade which was to usher in 
the Ninth Annual Interscholastic Circus. The brilliant electric arcs and the powerful search- 
lights showed forth the great three ringed arena in readiness for this fitting climax to the 
successful Interscholastic week. Promptly at seven o'clock two bands announced the 
approach of the grand street parade. Never before in the history of the field had there 
been such an array of wierd and ferocious animals, nor such a collection of strange and 
wonderful creations. Fifty stunts, pantomines, travesties, satires, farces, skits, in fact every 
sort of innovation imaginable, followed each other in quick succession. Forty clowns 
clamored for your attention with every laugh-provoking trick and jest in the budget of old 
King Jolly. 

The last strain of the band had hardly died away when, at the crack of the ring- 
master's whip the greatest show on earth was in progress. A warship, clouded in smoke 
and belching flame, moored before the forts of Vera Cruz and stormed the citadel. A 
monstrous stomach displayed all the pleasures of the night before and the gloom of the 
morning after. Poor Kathlyn fought her way thru jungle, fire, water, brimstone and the 
lion's den and was torn from the clutches of the desperate villain by her never failing 
lover. Mere man defied all the laws of nature in a death challenging swing thru the air. 
His bodv absolutely impregnable to the hottest of fires, the world's greatest high diver threw 
himself "into a sea of seething flame and emerged unscathed. Tumblers threw themselves 
in gyrations and giant swings while heavenly hash was manufactured before the worldly 
eyes of the onlookers. 

The first prize was awarded to a Rifle Team whose unerring aim never failed to hit 
the bull's eye, break bottles, and finallv released an Illinois pennant to the breeze. Its 
marksmen represented Beta Theta Pi. Delta Tau Delta staged a regular Circus Concert which 
received second award. The Students' best friend— the Movies— was reeled off in true pic- 
ture land style by Phi Kappa Sigma, and was awarded third cup. A mule that displayed 
all the traits of the well known long eared horse was given the blue ribbon in the animal 
show. It was presented by Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Among the clowns the prizes were awarded to M. Wolter, a real gosh darn constable, 
and to Tom Brown, a three legged man. In the doubles. Old Man Bugby and his wife 
drew the first cup, while F. E. Mills and Steve Birch as "Elmer and his Maw" received 
second award. . ,. , 

As a grand finale to the evening the Inter-Sorority Relay race furnished a thrill that 
made the shivers run down the back of Harry Gill himself. It was won by Alpha Chi Omega. 



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DAILT 
ILLIKI 



5EIDENBERG 




BI&LER 



m)t Jaihr limni #Mf 

Nathan Cock Seidenberg, '15 Editor 

Harry Edward Bigler, 15 Busin£ss Mandger 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Wilbur Otis Pendarvis 'i 5 Managing Editor 

Joseph Morgan Noble, '16 ... . Assis f an ? Editor 

Donald Mitchell Glover, '16 Assistant Editor 

Alfred Eidmann Kern, '17 Assistant Editor 

Fenton Hamilton Williams, '16 Assistant Editor 

Ralph Linden Barlow, *i 5 c Scout Edj 

Sidney Casner, 16 s ■ Edi 

Donald Eugini Currii :k, 16 Assistant Sporting Editor 

Raymond Lorimer Grantz, '17 Assistant Sporting Editor 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Russell Claude Swope, '15 Bookkeeper 

Klnnbth Giorci Brown, '16 Assistant Business Manager 

Hans Peter Greison, '16 Assistant Business Manager 

John Beitner Pagin '16 Assistant Business Manager 

H. Russell Ide, '18 Leon Adler '17 

Milton G. Silver, '17 w. R. Mathews, '17 

ATHLETIC REPORTERS 
O. R. Clements, '16 A. B. Matthew 'is 

Guy Reno, '15 q V _ Allan, '18 

WOMAN'S STAFF 
Louise Amborn, '16, Editor 

WOMAN'S REPORTERS 
Helen Johnson, '17 Eula Cordell, '15 

Rayna Simons, '17 Theresa Samuels, '18 

GENERAL STAFF REPORTERS 

C. W. Smith, '17 E yy. r EESEj > IQ - 

J. K. Barper, '16 h. S. Beardsley '17 

B. II. Clark, '16 s. D. Harwood, '16 
H. Boeschenstein, '18 |. |. Sholem '17 

C. W. Borton, '17 p. V. Arber/'i6 
M. F. Bovasd, '18 a. I. Eichberg '18 
A. I*,. Brown, '17 c. R. Gideon '17 
Dewitt Pulcipher, '18 W. I-;. Moore, '18 

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Editor-in-Chief 



Sidney D. Kirkpatrick 

Roger B. Bronson Business Manager 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



F. H. Williams Associate Editor 

VV. W. Sheldon Associate Editor 

D. E. Currier Athletic Editor 

J. J. Pitts Senior Editor 

W. G. Emmond Organization Editor 

D. M. Glover Press Editor 



J. H. Heindei University Activities 

F. R. Babcock Art Editor 

M. M. Lovell Asst. Art Editor 

H. Dubin Asst. Art Editor 

Roger Hill Roast Editor 

N. D. Belnap Asst. Roast Editor 



Hale Byers Asst. Roast Editor 



ORGANIZATIONS 

A A Odell Fraternities W. L. Ash beck Clubs and Societies 

Laura Bardwell Sororities W. P. Beaubien Clubs and Societies 

ATHLETICS 

A B Rayburn Football L. G. Krug Interclass Athletics 

R." Rea Brown Baseball ( ). 

Sidney Casner Track 

G. E. McGAUGHEY.Tnterclass Athletics 

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 

M Wolter Dramatics Pearl Bernhardt Women's Affairs 

L W Reese Oratory and Debate Dorothy Rinaker Women's Affairs 

D M. Glover Publications Ed. Shelby, Jr Military 

J. N. Greene Social Affairs 

SOPHOMORES ASSISTANT EDITORS 
Tom Brown H. R. Ferguson 



VV. 



Miscellaneous Athletics 
Watson Basketball 



H, 



L. Albaugh 

BUSINESS STAFF 
Pagin A sst - 



Harry W. Day 



J. B. 
R. W. Kritzer 
E. T. Colton 



J. W. Freels 
F. M. Judson 

158 



Business Manager 
J. B. Hickman 
R. A. Burton, Tr 



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F. R. Babcock 

and that of the following year. 
sarily haphazard and uncertain. 



M. M. Lovell 



The 1916 Illio is the 
first evidence which the 
student body has of the 
success or failure of the 
growing feeling that 
University Publications 
should be more carefully 
controlled and organized. 
In former years the 
Illio has been the pri- 
vate enterprise of the 
Manager and Editor. It 
has often been purely a 
money making proposi- 
tion. The financial con- 
trol which the Illini Pub- 
lishing Company exer- 
cises over the book has 
eliminated this element. 
Under the old system 
there was absolutely no 
connection between the 
management of one year 

Such a system has made advance and improvement neces- 
But now from the Sophomore Assistants are chosen the 
men'' who will produce the book next year. Thus the element of permanency for which 
there has been such a crying need is automatically introduced. The present Management 
has made a conscientious effort to thoroughly prepare the Sophomores for the problems 
which they will have to meet next year. 

The Management has endeavored to incorporate in the 1916 Illio all of the ideals for 
which a college annual should stand. We have considered the Illio as a publication of the 
University of Illinois, rather than a book put out by the Junior Class. Neither time nor 
expense have been spared to picture our University in the finest terms of the printing and 
engraving art. 

The staff of the present Illio has worked together in perfect harmony at all times, to 
each of its forty members we wish to acknowledge our appreciation. To a few we are 
particularly indebted for their painstaking efforts in creating this volume. The Art Editor 
Frank Babcock, and his able assistants, McDonald Lovell and Henry Dubin, have incorporated 
within the book more art work and of a better quality than has ever been exhibited in a 

student publication. 
Roger Hill has had com- 
plete charge of the 
Roast Section, and all 
that it adds to the suc- 
cess of the book must 
be accredited to his 
cleverness and industry. 
John Heindel has man- 
aged the Activities Sec- 
tion in a very creditable 
manner, and has ably as- 
sisted in much of the 
editorial routine. Fen- 
ton Williams, Joseph 
Pitts, Wyatt Emmond, 
and all seven of the 
sophomore assistants 
have worked hard. Much 
credit is due them. 
Sidney D. Kirkpatrick 
Roger B. Bronson 





J. H. Heindel 



R. E. Hill 



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SEIF^IEO 




GLOVER KRE1TZER. WOLTEr\S 

ILLIO 1916 STAEE 

HieKMAN WOOOHOFFE KEESE 




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EDITORIAL STAFF 

R. L. Barlow Editor 

E. H. Morrissey.... Associate Editor 

L. D. Tilton Art Editor 

GEORGE GlLl Associate Art Editor 



F. 


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Babcock 




c. 


A. Klein 


fACK 


Miller 




Sa 


mpsox Raphaelsox 


A. 


S. 


Tarnowski 




Roger Hill 


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Byers 




Phillip Corper 


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F. 


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Williams 


BUSINESS STAFF 


w 


. M. Siemens 




1 1. E. Webber.„ 


Business Manager 




C. M. Ferguson Circulation Manager 




W. li. Kuhn 


Advertisin 


g Manager 


P. 


D. 


Am shaky 




A. 


M. Kirch kk 


F. 


C. 


Norlin 




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G. AVRKS 



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AYRES KIRCHER MILLER NORLIN KLEIN 

TICKNOR HILL BABCOCK AMSBARY MOORE CORPER 

KUHN FERGUSON GILL WEBBER BARLOW TILTON TARNOWSKI 



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'Life' of Illinois." Soon after the opening day of 
magazine, for the fourth collegiate year of its 



The Siren calls herself the " 
school the first issue of this 

existence, appeared on the campus. The newcomers were accosted on every turn 
by the cry, "Siren, new Siren out today. Siren." One of these, not knowing what 
the name of the magazine implied, asked his upperclassman companion the mean- 
ing of the statement. "Well," began that person, "you know what kind of a 
magazine 'Life' is, don't you?" "Yes," replied the newcomer. "Then," continued 
the former, "the Siren is the 'Life' of Illinois." And the newcomer nodded 
understandingly. 



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Stanley P. Irwin Editor-in-Chief 

Eric F. Pihlgard Business Managcr 

LeslieR. Lumley Circulation Manager 

EDITORIAL STAFF 

Mildred Drew Lucille Needham 

Elizabeth Fuller F.H.Williams 

Olive Deane Hormel S. M. Raphaelson 

F. V. Arber T. Gibson 

Benjamin Wham Sidney Casner 

Bernice Stratton R- Gibson 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Leslie R. Lumley John Frier 

R. H. Klamt W. C. Peterson 

H. J. Bluhm B. H. Clark 

Building on the firm foundation of last year's successful management, the 
Illinois Magazine has not only increased its aspirations but its accomplishments 
as well. "Literary does not mean dull" has been the slogan of the staff this year, 
and as a result, the magazine has prospered. Two thousand people read its pages 
each month. The best literary productions of the campus, serious thought and 
discussions of the most prominent questions of the University life are included 
within its field. 



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ILLINOIS 
AGRICULTURE 




SIEBENS 



SACKRISON 



Arthur R. Siehens Editor 

Julius A. Sackrison Business Manager 

Sam S. Davis Circulation Manager 

Elizabeth Collum Household Science Editor 

Marguerite Bennett •...-. H. S. Associate Editor 

BOARD OF MANAGERS 
E. W. Hitchcock A. R. Siehens 

W. H. Chambers J- A. Sackrison 

Prof. W. C. Coffey Faculty Advisor 

JUNIOR ASSOCIATES 
George Curtiss 

T. T. Mills 



E. V. Bruington 



SOPHOMORE ASSISTANTS 



George Gehant 
E. C. Hopkins 
G. F. Cadisch 
J. J. Lacey 
A. R. Gould 



Roy E. Hipple 
J. R. Lindsey 
Karl Epstein 
E. H. Stevenson 

L. H. TUTTLE 



F. W. Graves 



This is the eighteenth successive year the Agricultural Club of the College of Agriculture 
has published a monthly magazine known as the "Illinois Agriculturist". In its earlier years 
the magazine was among the smallest and weakest published by the various agricultural 
colleges in the United States. Now it is second to none both in quality and size. In attempt- 
ing to put into the magazine an atmosphere of permanence, the present management has 
realized its ambition to a gratifying extent. Only sound and sanely conservative reading 
matter which has covered both university and outside agricultural affairs has been solicited 
and accepted. By serving both local and other agricultural interests, the management has 
sought to establish iii the "Agriculturist" influences which react from the University to the 
outside and from the outside to the University. 

W. C. COFFEY. 1' acuity Advisor 



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R. V. Waller, '16 Editor-in-Chief 

M. Rukin, '15 Business Manager 

R. R. Thomas, '16 Associate Editor 

J. E. Demuth, '15 Assistant Business Manager 

H. E. Austin, '15 President of the Board 

E. A. James, '15 Vice President of the Board 

P. W. Freark, '16 Secretary of the Board 

TECHNOGRAPH BOARD 

E. A. James, '15 E. E. Society 

R. R. Thomas, '16..... E. E. Society 

J. E. Demuth, '15 C. E. Society 

P. W. Freark, 'i6 C. E. Society 

II. E. Austin, '15 M. E. Society 

L. H. Schickedanz, '16 M. E. Society 

M. Rukin, '15 Ry. Club 

E. H. Schlader, '16 Ry. Club 

T. TT. Griftner, '15 Mining Society 

TT. E. Willson, '16 Mining Society 

R. V. Waller, '16 ...Member-at-Large 

A. M. Tower, '17 Member-at-Large 

E. G. Roos, '17 Member-at-Large 

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E. G. ROOS P. W. FREARK 

L. H. SCHICKEDANZ A. M. TOWER E. A. JAMES E. H. SCHLADER 

R.R.THOMAS R.V.WALLER H.E.AUSTIN M. RUKIN J. E. DEMUTH 



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The Technograph, established in 1885 by the civil engineering students, has 
continued to grow until it is now the technical magazine for the entire College of 
Engineering. It was formerly issued as an annual, but under a reorganization a 
few years ago, it became a quarterly. The Technograph is published by a board 
of representatives from the various engineering societies. This board chooses 
the editor and business manager, and determines in general the policy of the 
publication. 

The greater part of the magazine is given to articles of a technical nature, 
written by undergraduates, alumni, members of the faculty, or people of authority 
not connected with the University. A department is given over to the notes of 
activities of the participating societies, and another to general notes of the College 
of Engineering. The present policy of The Technograph is, in general, to provide 
a medium by which the ideas of the engineering students may be expressed and 
thru which the results of the different engineering departments may be published, 
and to place before the undergraduate body the ideas of men in practical 
engineering. 



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SUMMER 
ILLINI" 



REUSE 





RATCLIFf 



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The Student Newspaper of the Summer Sessi 



sion 



Leal W. Reese, 16 Editor 

T. G. Ratcuff, '15 Business Manager 

Harry L. Owen, '16 Campus Scout 



EDITORIAL STAFF 



Isabel Wilson 
J. A. Chase 
R. D. Bowden 
A. Ft. Armstrong 
F. E. Cavette 
W. R. Morrison 
L, E. Frailey 



Grace Koier 
L. S. Ashley 

R. E. HlMSTEDT 

N. T. Bolster 
W. P. Beard 
R. H. Engle 
P. FT. Everhart 



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I he Summer Ilhm has made a place for itself as the newspaper of the 
Summer session of the University, in the same way and to about the same relative 
extent as The Daily Mini has done in the Winter session. It is the only means 
whereby official and unofficial notices of coming events can be given general 
publicity, and in that respect it is sufficiently useful. But it also serves to express 
the unity of spirit and interest in the student and faculty community during the 
summer period. Recognition of this essential usefulness has led the Mini 
Publishing Company to put The Summer Mini on the same basis as The Daily 
Mini for the future. 

F. W. Scott. 
Chairman of Illini Publishing Co. 



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"BAUBLE 



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During the year of 1914-15 Mask and Bauble Dramatic Club has maintained 
its high standard in the production of representative modern plays. "Higher 
Up," from the pen of the late Thacher Howland Guild ; "The Great Galeoto," by 
Jose Echegary; and "Our Wives," by Kraft and Mandel, were successfully 

staged. 

In the production of these plays the tastes of the student audience, as well 
as the interest of the student actor, were considered. From an abundance of 
material exceptionally strong casts were selected by open tryouts; and those 
actors showing a high degree of faithfulness and ability were honored by election 
to membership in the club. 

The aim of Mask and Bauble to foster an interest in the drama among the 
students, has been furthered by a playwright competition. The acting of short 
sketches by members of the club at open meetings, has developed their talent 
and aroused a wholesome interest in the work of the organization. 

Realizing the benefits of cooperation with other dramatic clubs, Mask and 
Bauble took the initiative in forming a national organization known as the Asso- 
ciated University Players. The clubs at' Northwestern, Wisconsin and Chicago 
joined with Mask and Bauble as charter members oi this organization. 

An irreparable loss has been sustained in the death of Thacher Howland 
Guild. Mask and Bauble had its beginning. in ope of Mr. Guild's drama classes. 
and under his influence it developed to its pr-eseut-position as one of the foremost 
university dramatic clubs of the country. Mask and Bauble stands today as a 
fitting memorial to Professor Guild's work in the interests of the drama at 
Illinois. 

OFFICERS OF MASK AND BAUBLE 
First Semester Second Semester 

A. M. Baker President W. O. Pendarvis 

Mitchell Wolter litis. Manager Mitchell Wolter 

Frances Keen Secretary Frances Keen 

F. C. Ferguson Treasurer F. C. Fkrguson 

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MUSSENDEN SAVAGE BRYANT BRE1TSTADT MOORE MARKS J. BAKER PENDARVIS 

LINK BYERS WOOLMAN KATZENBERG PURSLEY MC NULTA CASTLEBERRY 

KEEN WOLTER PATTERSON A. M. BAKER SEXAUER GROSSBERG MITCHELL FERGUSON 



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HONORARY MEMBERS 
Thomas Arkle Clark Martha J. Kyle 

Stuart P. Sherman Mrs. T. A. Clark 

F. K. W. Drury Mrs. P. S. Sherman 

Walter A. Buchen Daisy Blaisdell 



W. O. Pendarvis 
Hilah J. Link 



Ruth Mussenden 
W. E. Savage 
Emma M. Breitstadt 
William A. Moore 
Frank C. Ferguson 

Maude Marks 
Scott McNulta 
Hale Byers 



Seniors 



A. M. Baker 
Juniors 



Emma Pursley 
Frances Keen 



Sophomores 



Richardine Woolman 
Herman S. Katzeniserg 
Mitchell Wolter 
Mae M. Sexauer 
Grace Mitchell 

Nelle R. Patterson 
Victor FT. Grossberg 
Stephen Meserve Birch 



Joseph J. Baker 

Freshmen 
Georgia Castlererry Robert Bryant 

Pauline White 




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The Illinois Union Dramatic Club has presented comic operas "manned" by 
the students for several years. In 191 1 "The Maid of the Moon" was produced. 
"The Dad of the Undergrad" was staged in 1912, and "The Prodigal Prince" in 

*9 r 3- 

The production of a play in 1914 was tabooed by the University authorities 
because of the scarlet fever epidemic. Nothing short of an earthquake could have 
stopped the production of a play in 191 5, and as a result "The Maid and the 
Myth" was staged. The book was written by W. L. Van Sant ; the lyrics by 
R. F. Field and the music by Hale Byers. "The Maid and the Myth" eclipsed 
any of the previous successes, and prospects for future production are very 
bright. 

The keen competition among student playwrights sets a higher standard each 
year, and there is always an abundance of the particular kind of dramatic talent 
needed to stage the operas. These two factors make a satisfactory combination 
in meeting the student demand for operas that are full of originality and "pep". 



OFFICERS 
First Semester Second Semester 

A. P. Peyraud President K. V. Root 

K. V. Root Vice-President C. M. Ferguson 

H. W. Deakman Manager MI. \V. Dkakman 



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UNIVF.RSITV A (' T I V IT I K S 




DUTTON 


WOLTER 


FERGUSON 


JARVIS 


FULLER 


DEAKMAN 




PEYRAUD 




ROOT 



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Founded 191 1 



MEMBERS 



Wesley Arthur Behel 
Harry Frank Cogdall 
Homer Ward Deakman 
Marshall Simeon Dutton 
George Capron Feller 
Clarence Milford Ferguson 
Harold Coltlon Fuller 



Donald Mitchell Glover 
William Bancroft Jarvis 
David Thorsten Larsen 
Fred Leon Mills 
Alisert Paul Peyraud 
Kimball Valentine Root 
Mitchell Wolter 



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The Lambkins Club is a unique organization at the University of Illinois. 
It was organized in the Spring of nineteen fourteen as "an organization of leaders 
in Illinois dramatics, literature, art, music and forensics for the purpose of asso- 
ciation of such men and for the encouragement of student activity along these 

lines." 

The Lambkins plan to give an annual gambol on the first day of Spring or as 
close thereto as possible. Their first appearance was in conjunction with the 
Interscholastic Concert of the musical clubs in the Spring of nineteen fourteen, 
when they scored a marked success. 

The Lambkins attempt nothing in the line of what is generally termed 
"legitimate" entertainment. Their gambols will always be more in the nature of 
minstrel, burlesque, or revue. 



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FRAZIER ASHBECK MCCRACKEN HILL 

Dl'TTON KIRBY MYERS WOLTER CLOVER BYERS SCHLUETER 

DEAKMAN MACOMBER ROOT FIELD MORRISSEY BENNETT 



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OFFICERS 
First Semester Second Semester 

R F. Field President K. V. Root 

K. V. Root Vice-President E. H. Morrissey 

H. W. Deakman Secretary and Treasurer H. W. Deakman 

Business Manager H. W. Deakman 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

S. Chat wood Burton 

Tin-: Fate Thacher Rowland Guild 

C. F. Gustafson 

G. C. Bainum 



Floyd W. Mori lm an 



R. F. Field 

E. TT. Morrissey 



YV. L. Ashbeck 

M. Wolter 



H. Byers 
W. S. Frazier 



POST GRADUATES 

SENIORS 
K. V. Root 
M. S. Dutton 

JUNIORS 
W. K. McCracken 

W. F. SCHLUETER 

F. F. Mills 

SOPHOMORES 
S. M. Birch 



W. I. Kirby 



W. H. Bennett 
H. W. Deakman 



D. M. Glover 
R. E. Hill 



F. B. Macomp.er 
R. E. Myers 



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"Higher Up", a farce-comedy by the late Thacher Howland Guild of the 
English department, was presented at the Illinois Theatre March 28, 1914, under 
the direction of the author, assisted by F. Kitson Cowley. The play is a 
sparkling, witty composition clever enough to be comparable to the best modern 
comedies. In the play, the match making mothers, the meddlesome newspaper, 
and the familiar melodrama character, "the Man Higher Up", are satirized. The 
characters are "real" people, mixed up in an affair that might have happened. 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Norman Eliot ( Babe) Stephen Birch 

Jim Howe ( Jumbo ) Hale Byers 

Clark Salton (Sal ) Hubert Beal 

Mrs. Brown Mae Sexauer 

Mary Brown Richardink Woolman 

"Cop" Riggs N. McK. Kneisly 

Mrs. Cruller Maud Marks 

Henry Hedges F. E. Walser 

Fay Manners Margaret Walkerly 

Fred Britt R. H. Humphries 

Julia Bandy Ruth Mussenden 

Aunt Tane Stella Gonsior 

Mr. Ribey A. M. Baker 

Eloise Eldrich Jane Link 



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The presentation of "The Great Galeoto" by Mask and Bauble was one of 
the features of commencement week. The author, Jose Echegaray, was a Spanish 
dramatist of unrivaled popularity, and "The Great Galeoto was one of his best 
plays It is a tragedy in the grand style, replete with delicate shadings of effects 
which demand the highest dramatic art to produce. This was the heavies 
play ever staged by Mask and Bauble and the cast which was carefully selected 
included some of the best dramatic talent in the University. The successful 
production of the play was a fitting climax to the excellent work which Mr. Cowley 
did for the club as coach before his transfer to the University of Minnesota. 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

T eo dora Nelle Rand Patterson 

Mercedes Mary Criighton 

Don Severe W . O. Pr ndarvis 

' q f , A. M. Baker 

Don Juhan E G Barritt 

Ernesto _ „ c 

Rueda. I.C.Stone 



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The three-act farce, "Our Wives", adopted from the German hy Helen Kraft 
and Frank Mandel, was presented during the Fifth Annual Homecoming Celebra- 
tion, Nov. 13th and 14th, 1914. This was the first play ever produced by the 
club without the guidance and support of Prof. Guild or F. Kitson Cowley. The 
efficient work of the new coach, Mrs. Elsie Weary Heilman, was evidenced by a 
pleasing interpretation which compared favorably with the original professional 
production. The play was staged as an experiment and marks a departure from 
the production of a "straight comedy" for the fall play. The favorable criticism 
of the student audience was encouraging and plays of a similar nature wdl be 
considered for future production. 

CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Frank Bowers, a Libretist V. H. Grossberg 

Sylvan Martin, a Stock Broker Scott McNulta 

Harry Lyon, an Artist H. S. Katzenberg 

Melville Tatum, a Dentist Robert Bryant 

Otto, Frank's Man W. E. Savage 

Wilson, Friday Evening Nelle Rand Patterson 

Wilson, Saturday Evening .Richardine Woolman 

Emily, nee Bothner Mae Sexauer 

Margaret Lyon, nee Cavanaugh Pauline White 

Elizabeth Tatum, nee Brooks Georgia Castleberry 



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Bv Bjornstjeme Bjomson 



The annual dramatic productions of the Adelphic and llliola Literary Societies 
were presented in Morrow Hall on the ist and 2nd of May, 1914. The first play 
was "Mr Steinman's Corner", by Alfred Sutro. The play itself was up to the 
University standards, and the previous dramatic experience of several members 
of the cast helped to give it a successful production. The second play, Newly 
Married" was a two-act comedy from the pen of the noted Swedish playwright 
Bjornstjerne Bjornson. Both plays were presented under the direction of 
F. Kitson Cowley, and too much can not be said of the admirable manner in which 
he trained and directed the cast. 



"MR. STEINMANN'S CORNER" 

The Cast 

Percy llanhvick - O. A. Frazier 

Mrs." llardwick Katherine Chase 

m ra Nelle R. Patterson 
Joseph: the "butler:: J- H. Armstrong 

"NEWLY MARRIED" 

The Cast 

The Father - — *■ E ' FALSER 

The Mother Nellie Roberts 

Laura, their daughter Laura UARmvKU. 

Axel, her husband - * '■ ^ * RISL ^ 

Mathilde Nkllb R. Pattmsoj. 



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The Players Club is a social dramatic organization of members of the 
faculty of the University of Illinois. 

Plays Presented May ii, 1914 
morrow hall 

"THE PORTRAIT" 
A fantasy in one act by Thacher Rowland Guild, presented for the first time 
under his direction. 

CHARACTERS 

The Daughter Mrs. Kay The Father Mr. Guild 

The Mother Mrs. Clark The Wolf Mr. Cowley 

The Artist Mr. Todd The Lover Mr. Kay 

"RYLAND" 

A one-act comedy under the direction of Mr. Cowley. 

characters 

Ryland Mr. Cowley Fielding. Ryland's Pupil Mr. Kay 

Goaler Mr. Tuttle Mary, Ryland's wife Mrs. Clark 

Haddrill, a printseller Mr. Oliver Sir Joshua Reynolds Mr. Drury 

Angelica Kauffman Miss Jones 

Two plays by Thacher Rowland Guild, presented Friday, Dec. 18, and 
Saturday, Dec. 19, 1914, in Morrow Hall. 

"THE POWER OF A GOD" 

characters 

Dr Toyce Mr. Phelps Dr. Hills Mr. Van Kleek 

Dr. Cameron Mr. Kay Mrs. Hills Miss Jones 

Scene — Office of Drs. Cameron and Joyce. 
"You have the power of a God but you use it like a devil." 

"THE HIGHER GOOD" 

CHARACTERS 

Supt. McAdley Mr. Drury Gustafson Mr. Oliver 

"Easy Joe," a convert Mr. Tuttle Capt. P.annon Mr. Jamison 

Bill the Bum Mr. Phelps Bro. Adams Mr. Moore 

Hon. John Broadleigh, Governor of New York Mr. Woolbert 

"This is one of those hard but necessary sacrifices that we have to make to 
the higher good." 

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PLAYLRS 



CLUB 



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The greatest change effected in the Oratorical and Debating work at the 
University this year was the formation of the two new debating leagues, the 
Midwest Debating League, and the I. M. I. Debating League. By dropping 
Indiana and Ohio as debating opponents and taking up Michigan and Wisconsin, 
Illinois now has debates with every strong forensic institution in the west except 
Northwestern, and her standing among other universities as a public speaking 
institution can be readily determined. 

A. V. Essingson, representing the University, won first place in the Northern 
Oratorical League contest at Madison last year. This was the first time that 
Illinois has been able to secure first honors in the classic oratorical contest of the 
west. E. L. Hasker, the peace orator, was second in the state contest held at 
Aledo. He tied for first place, according to the decision of the judges, but the 
Knox representative was given the decision on percentages. 

A much larger number than usual tried out for places on the fall and spring 
debating teams. In both cases able and experienced men were selected. In the 
fail debates with Iowa and Minnesota, both contests were close and well fought. 
Illinois lost both contests not because she had weak teams, but because she had 
engaged in stronger competition than ever before. 

R. E. Himstedt, a veteran of three debating teams, was selected as the 
University's representative in the N. O. L. contest to be held at Iowa City May 7. 
Mr. Himstedt has a masterful oration, and with his vigorous and forceful 
delivery, should acquit himself creditably in this contest. Judges who heard 
the peace orator this year declared that G. D. Stopp, the winner, delivered one 
of the finest orations heard in tryouts at Illinois for years. They predicted that 
he would take a high rank among the state orators at the contest held at Rock 
Island. 

In both oratorical and debating work, Illinois is now in competition with the 
best universities in the west. That she can assume at once a position of leadership 
against such universities as Michigan and Wisconsin can hardly be expected. 
But those who are actively interested in forensic work, and who see the steady 
advances being made in both oratory and debate, feel that the time is not far 
distant when Illinois will come up in forensics just as she has come up in athletics, 
and will assume her natural position of leadership among the great universities of 
the west. 

Interest will be especially stimulated next year when the Northern Oratorical 
League contest will be held at Urbana in the Auditorium. 

L. W. Reese. 



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! I ;C\\ FRAZIER 

WINTERS WHAM HIMSTEDT 

^lie ^oartt of Curatory mtft Achate 

OFFICERS 

Benjamin Wham President 

Ralph E. Hi mstedt Vice-President 

Arthur O. Frazier Secretary 

Charles P. Winters Treasurer 

George W. Bristow Sergeant-at-Arms 

MEMBERS 
Charles II. Woolbert, A.M. Benjamin Wham, '15 

Lew R. Sarett. A.B. Arthur O. Frazier, '15 

[ames M. Phelps, A.B. Charles P. Winters, '15 

Stuart Pratt Sherman, Ph.D. Ralph E. Himstedt, '16 

Ralph E. Heilman, Ph.D. George Washington Bristow. '16 

A. Chester Han ford, A.M. 



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IIUmats-iMinnesota Rebate 

I. M. I. DEBATING LEAGUE 
Auditorium, Urbana, December ii, 1914 

QUESTION 
Resolved, That the several states should establish a schedule of minimum 
wage for unskilled labor, constitutionality granted. 



Affirmative (Illinois) 
Earl Ewert 
Herbert Helm 
Ralph Himstedt 



Negative (Minnesota) 
Wendell Burns 
Edwin Chapman 
Dean Campbell 




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JUDGES 

Hon. Ernest Bross Indianapolis, Indiana 

Proe. E. K. Patton Madison, Wisconsin 

Prof' George Mattii ews Madison, Wisconsin 

Decision 
Unanimous for Minnesota 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 



Jlllittms-Jtatoa Rebate 

I. M. I. DEBATING LEAGUE 
Iowa City, Iowa, December ii, 1914 

QUESTION 
Resolved, That the several states should establish a schedule of minimum 
wage for unskilled labor, constitutionality granted. 



Affirmative (Iowa) 
Howard Holt 
Robert Shaw 
Ray Short 



Negative (Illinois) 
Frank C. Slater 
Vernon T. Stevens 
Benjamin Wham 




SLATER 



WHAM 



STEVENS 



JUDGES 

Prof. Milton O'Neil Madison, Wisconsin 

Prof. J. Cochrane Northfield, Minnesota 

Pres. Keith, Oshkosh Normal Oshkosh, Wisconsin 

Decision 
Two to one for Iowa 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 



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MIDWEST DEBATING LEAGUE 

Auditorium, Urbana, March 26, 1915 

QUESTION 
Resolved, That in anti-trust legislation, labor unions be exempt from con- 
sideration as combinations in restraint of trade, constitutionality waived. 



HIMSTKDT 




Affirmative (Illinois) 

( rEORGE W. BRISTOW 

Edward B. I [ayes 
Ralph E. Himstedt 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 



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MIDWEST DEBATING LEAGUE 
Ann Arbor, Michigan, March 26, 1915 

QUESTION 

Resolved, That in anti-trust legislation, labor unions be exempt from con- 
sideration as combinations in restraint of trade, constitutionality waived. 



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GROSSMAN 
BYE LEONARD 



Negative (Illinois) 

Donald A. Grossman 
Herbert W. Bye 
Frank B. Leonard 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 




NORTHERN ORATORICAL 
LEAGUE CONTEST 

Iowa City, Iowa, May 7, 1915 

Illinois Representative 
Ralph Ebner Himstedt 

"The Brand of Cain" 



INTERCOLLEGIATE PEACE 
ASSOCIATION CONTEST 

Augustana College, Rockford 
April 9, 191 5 

Illinois Representative 
Gerald Darfield Stopp 

"The New Democracy" 



198 



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officers or the military band 






LAUDING 




LtONARO 



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GKMNBI -'\%\ 



A. A. Harding Director 



E. G. Bucher President 

R. E. Greenberg Secretary 



W. N. Leonard Business Manager 

R. S. Mason Drum Major 



INSTRUMENTATION 



Solo Clarinets 
E. G. Bucher 
H. B. Lotz 
G. I. Lindberg 

E. J. Jones 

F. *M. Lescher 
First Clarinets 

R. T. Olmsted 
Carl Clegg 
F. S. Shy 
D. E. Compton 
Second Clarinets 

F. L. Stevenson 
H. L. Slack 

J. H. Rapp 
Walter Emch 

G. C. Tanton 
Third Clarinets 

F. E. Richart 
F. F. Goldsmith 

B. R. Battey 

C. P. Bourassa 
A. W. Harz 

T. J. Strong 
Alto Clarinet 

R. I. Shawl 
Bass Clarinet 

R. W. Schecter 



Flutes and Piccolos 


Solo Cornets 


Euphonium 


H. N. Byers 


W. I. Kirby 


M. J. McClelland 


H. C. Hawes 


P. H. Rogers 


Baritones 


C. 0. Hawkinson 


H. G. Winans 


R. R. Wagner 


V. T. Stevens 


W. W. Miller 


0. A. Houg 


Oboe 


First Cornets 


C. E. Hungerford 


E. G. Young 


R. E. Davis 


E-Flat Basses 




R. E. Greenberg 


C. E. Weingartner 


E-Flat Clarinet 


James Kantor 


E. V. Allen 


K. A. Clark 


Trumpets 


F. A. Wiltz 


Bassoons 


F. E. Newcomb 


Saxophones 


G. B. Ruby 


S. J. Bess 


E. G. Wilkinson 


N. J. Lenhart 


French Horns 


F. W. Mohlman 


String Basses 


M. E. Hinds 


H. N. Brers 


Douglas Wright 


G. B. McMillen 


C. N. Davison 


R. H. Purdy 


M. C Alvea 


J. F. Ganger 




W.B.Mcisenheldei 


Cellos 


BB-Flat Basses 




W. N. Leonard 


Mellophones 


L. B. Hiebe! 


B. L. Kirk 


F. C. Halm 


(',. W. Unger 


Snare Drums 


A. B. Brown 


Tympaxi 

K. V. Root 


H. F. Woodyatt 


1 ROMBONES 


K. Kennedy 


1'. R. Powers 


Band Clerk 


E. W. Gouwens 


W. A. Gatward 


J. 11. Tyler 




W. I. Wirtli 


Bass Drum 


L. E. Hill 


Librarian 


E. J. Anderle 


F. G. Olbrich 


II. L. Gogerty 



R. II. Smith and E. II. Renner, Propertymen. 



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UNIVERSITY A f T I V I T I E S 




One of the most satisfactory features of the wonderful growth of the University of 
Illinois has been the development of the University Military Band. It has been in existence 
for twenty-five years and is now one of the most important institutions of the University 
and one of which all are justly proud. 

Beginning in 1890 with a mere handful of musicians, it has grown until it is now the 
largest University band in the country. Its roster includes over two hundred men, divided 
into First, Second and Reserve Bands and the Trumpet and Drum Corps. Accompanying 
this development has been the accumulation of a band library of over two thousand selections. 
The same class of programs that are played by Sousa, limes. Pryor and other noted bands 
are played by the band on its concert tours and at the campus concerts. The instruments 
which are the property of the University are valued at over six thousand dollars and are 
all of high grade and excellent tone. 

To the leadership of Albert Austin Harding is due the credit for the great advance 
made in the band in the past decade. Mr. Harding is not only a talented leader and director, 
but he is also a master of all band instruments, and it has been under his direct supervision 
that the Band Library has been accumulated and the instruments selected. One of his 
ambitions has been to see courses for bandmasters in the curriculum of the University. His 
hopes were realized this year and there are now courses leading to both the direction and 
organization of bands. 

Another feature which he has introduced is the presenting to each graduating band 
player a gold medal watch fob which corresponds to an athletic "I". During the year a 
short course will be -given for all who wish to acquaint themselves with the methods used 
in organizing and maintaining a successful band. 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 



J§sam& Heaiment Pattfc poster 



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A. A. Harding. 



.Director 



Solo Clarinets 
G. C. Tanton 
B. R. Battey 
A. W. Harz 
T. J. Strong 

First Clarinets 
H. A. Drew 
R. M. Netz 
F. F. Goldsmith 

Second Clarinets 

E. S. Huffman 
L. O. Mitchell 
S. A. Bleisch 

Third Clarinets 

F. V. Arber 
C. R. Hazen 

Propertymen 

L. M. Lindsey 
R. W. B'arlowe 



Flute and Piccolo 
A. M. Tower 
C. H. Laurence 
H. O. Frey 

Clarinets 

S. A. Bleisch 
Roy Lawrence 
R. E. Rankin 
L O. Mitchell 

Saxophone 

L. M. Becker 

Basses 

N. E. Sheldon 
W. A. Manuel 
L. M. Becker 



Trumpeters 
A. S. Elton 
S. J. Thomas 
C A. Peterson 
P. M. Boston 
C. W. Bates 
H. W. Gibson 
H. H. Haaker 
G. W. Lutes 



Solo Cornets 

E. D. Swanberg 
R. E. Chambers 
D. L. Ott 
T. S. Tanner 
A. C. Schneider 
R. de la Garza 
O. E. Sinclair 
G. C. Holman 



First Cornets 

E. F. Rehnquist 
H. B. Norviel 
H. T. Gallaher 
G. G. Webster 
C. H. Gewalt 
R. L. Price 



Second Cornets 
E. G. Weiler 
L. W. Zeller 



Trombones 

A. R. Wilson 

D. G. Evans 
L. A. Rahn 
A. F. Lenzen 
J. L. Brown 
I. L. Ratcliffe 
R. P. Shapley 

E. L Nott 
Baritones 

C. E. Huugerford 
T. H. Burrell 
Basses 

E. V. Allen 
R. G. Roberts 

E. E. Greenwell 
N. E. Sheldon 

Drums 

F. A. Parks 
H. E. Kent 
R. B. Zinser 
E. S. Kriegh 
E. O. Nay 



Third Cornets 
H. G. Antenen 
N. E. Wiedemann 

Piccolos and Flutes 
L. G. Krug 
H. S. Hinrichs 
R. R. Warren 



Saxophones 
B. R. Huff 
U. S. Postel 



Horns 

W.B.Meisenhelder 
R. E. Gregory 
J.M.Knappenberger 
Sherman Ingels 
F. A. Volstorff 
F. J. Schulz 



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Drums 

C. C. Burgett 

C. M. Ginter 
W. E. Hayne 
W. T. Ritter 

D. C. Webster 
W. K. Crawford 

E. O. Nay 

Altos 

C. A. Peterson 
H. W. Gibson 
J. L. Crawford 
H. J. Clinebell 

F. S. Wales 
E. E. Mills 



Trombones 

Smith Curtis 
Lawrence Kieffer 
P. W. Rathye 
A. C. Paddock 
W. H. Williams 
P. M. Boston 

Baritones 

T. J. Warren 
G. E. Mercer 
A. E. Kraekmann 

Cornets 

W. H. Hyslop 
C. C. Wiley 
J. E. Smith 
J. H. Singleton 
W. F. Sloan 
T. A. Stockdale 



"Strumpet ano J)rum (Horps 



R. L. Worcester 
Ivan ReVeal 

E. G. Brya 
S. J. Griffith 
Russell Levitt 
W. T. Doe 

F. L. Shonkwiler 
E. E. Mills 
Paul Rathye 



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F. S. Wales 
L. C. Strubinger 
A. C. Paddock 
H. A. Millman 

Drummers 

C. C. Burgett 
Lloyd Castle 
C. M. Ginter 
W. E. Hayne 

202 



F. L. Shonkwiler 
Edson Wright 
W. T. Doe 
Russell Levitt 

C. W. Bates 

G. W. Lutes 
L H. Gift 
R. L. Price 
H. T. Clapp 
W. N. Black 

R. L. Worcester 
Ivan ReVeal 
E. G. Brya 
S. J. Griffith 
G. T. Avery 
W. E. DeLong 
S. J. Crooker 
L. E. Rugh 



G. H. Reid 
L. W. Reid 
W. T. Ritter 
Dewent Schuler 

D. C. Webster 
W. K. Crawford 
T. E. Stockdale 
Smith Curtis 

E. O. Nay 

J. T. Conover 




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The Second Regiment Band 



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The Trumpet and Drum Corps 

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V N I V E R S I T y AC T I V I T I E S 



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[914 — 23rd Season — 1915 

OFFICERS 

K L. Cooper President 

W. K. McCracken Secretary-Treasurer 

,^ j nivis Easiness Manager 

D. M. Glover Assistant Business Manager 

MANDOLIN CLUB GLEE CLUB 

G. D. Gr-Iswold, Leader S. D. Marquis, Leader 

,-• . itj, j ;• First Tenors 

First Mandolins _ ,, 

Glenn Christy, 15 
G. D. Griswold, 15 w H Mandeville, '17 

E. A. Beius, '16 y A SmitH| - i8 

W. K. McCracken, 16 ;. s C uthberton, -'18 

R, B. Coolidge, 18 j j, Carroll , - i7 

,,,,,. E. I. Pilchard, '16 

.Second Mandolins Second Tenors 

Forest Behis, '16 jj M. Glover, '16 

E. V. Kratz, '15 R. E. Denz/i6 

R. M. Davis, '17 q H. Butler, '17 

^, . , ., , ,. A. S. Graven, '17 

Third Mandolins L R Moon, '17 

K. L. Cooper, '15 p irst Bass 
W. K. Manuel, "13 s D Marquis, '14 

R. F. Vansant, '16 a. E. Kraeckmann, '16 

„, , , C. W. Smith, '17 

Mandolas p y LeacHj '15 

W. Wyman, '15 N. Romero, ' 18 

J. L. Largent, '16 ,sV<<hu/ Bern 

Donald Grossman, '16 
Mando-cello r_ j Patterson, '16 

Siegfried Mornkoiil, '16 G. D. Woodward, '18 

1 1. A. Cable, '16 
Guitars L. S. Morrill, '15 

A. L. Beams, '16 Accompanist 

E. C Pierce, '15 N. J. Leniiart, '16 

Specialty Man 

B. F. Magomber, '17 



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(SIcc smii JUmbolin Club 




BABCOCK DEXZ CRAVEN WOODWARD GROSSMAN BUTLER PILCHARD 

CHRISTY ROMERO COOLIDGE DAVIS LEACH CARROLL KRATZ MOON 

C.W.SMITH CADLE J. A. SMITH E. A. BEBB MARQUIS KRAECKMANN PATTERSON MANTEL WYMAN 

MANDEV1LLE VANSANT MCCRACKEN COOPER BEVIS GLOVER GR1SWOLI) LARGENT HORN KOHL F. BEBB 



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AMERICA 



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Military Apartment 



Great progress has been made in the military department of the University in 
the last year. From 1700 cadets in 1913-14, it has increased to 2133. The corps 
was reorganized into an infantry brigade of two regiments commanded by a 
Cadet Colonel, and each regiment by a Cadet Lieutenant Colonel. 

A new uniform, the olive drab woolen service— the same as worn by the U.S. 
Army— has been approved by the board of trustees, to take effect at the beginning 
of the next school year. 

The increase in efficiency, however, has quite equaled the increase in numbers, 
due in a large part to the greater interest and energy displayed by the cadet officers. 

Upon the report of the U. S. Army officer who inspected the corps last year, 
the War department, for the first time rated the University as "Distinguished" 
in its military department. A division of Military information has been estab- 
lished in the department to collect and tabulate all valuable military data. 

In the future, credit will be given for two semesters military drill, to all students 
attending the summer military camps, and those having this experience wdl lie 
given preference for appointment in the corps of cadets. 

The University has been honored by a number of distinguished visitors in the 
past year who were very favorably impressed by the showing of the military 
department. One of these, President Drinker of Lehigh University was especially 
enthusiastic and complimentary. 

Major Webster's motto: "Efficiency and not popularity." 



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' X I V F. R S 1 T Y A f T I V I T I E S 





Major F. D. Webster, U. S. A. 
Commandant 



Colonel J. N. Greene 
Commanding Brigade 



Officers of % ^rtgaoc 





Lieutenant Colonel A. H. Grunewald 
Commanding First Regiment 



Lieutenant Colonel W. C. Armstrong 
Commanding Second Regiment 



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junior ©ffrters 



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Z1PPR0DT THORNE CLINE NEBEL BAKER MILLER 

GRISWOLI) DUNHAM RITTS BUTLER JAMES 

GRUNEWALD ARMSTRONG HOOD POOL 
HOIT HERMANN STOPP 



HUISKEN 

BARREAU RALL SLATER DAVIS 

HOSTETLER KNAPP ELLES GREENE MAJOR WEBSTER 

LINCOLN BARDEN 



NIVER 



Jmttxtr Officers 




BEAUBIEN STONE KRITZER ROHLFING CHASE MORROW TROSTER WALLER 
BELL HARVEY REESE MILLER GREISON SWARTOUT A.G.STEINMAYER JOHNSON LAMKINS EPPINGER 
HAAN LENZING SHELDON HUTCHINSON CURTISS BARNES SCHALLER HOUGH CRANE STICE VIBELOUS 
FAIRBANKS R.A.STE1 N M A YER MILLAR MASON MAJ.WEBSTER DENZ THOMAS SMITH 

NORTH NOXON 
S TT FI It V 

GAGE VAN NATTER MC CUMBER ROGERS MULAC ELDRIDGE BEATTY AMSHARY 



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;Nan~(!lamttttssiatt£fr Officers 




POWERS COUNTRYMAN ONEIL SMITH NEEDLER RUEDI HILBERT 

LOGAN SIMPSON COULTAS STANLEY SCHMIDT BORTON JOBST 

CALHOUN BONDURANT WARE CADDISH LAWRENCE TAYLOR DEWEY MC NULTA 

SWAIN SHARER MC KECHNIE LOVELL NELSON MARCH SMITH DALEY 

PAGE SIFGMUND FERGUSON GROSS KERN OTT TROUT DUTTON CITIZEN GIFT 

AXELINE HUSSON FINLEY CRAWFORD GROSSBERG BABCOCK KNOCHE ADAMS AYRES 



Jfattrmal JUserto Cxirps 



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AYRF.S NORRIS CURTISS A.G.STEINM AYER 

PETERSON LYON PRESIDENT JAMES BELL RALL 

GROSSBERG ELLES MAJOR WEBSTER SMITH SHELBY R. A. STEINM AYER 



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BRIGADE OFFICERS 

Colonel Commanding J- N. Greene 

Brigade Adjutant Capt. G. D. Stopp 

FIRST REGIMENT 

Lieutenant Colonel Commanding A. H. Grunewald 

Captain and Adjutant R. L. Herman 

Captain and Quartermaster A. M. Barreau 

Regimental Sergeant Major F. R. Babcock 

Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant J. C. Knoche 

Regimental Commissary Sergeant A. M. Adams 

Regimental Color Sergeant M. R. Finley 

FIRST BATTALION 

Maj or E - C. Elles 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant E. A. Smith 

Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster B. P. Reinsch 

Sergeant Major J- H. Needles 



Company "A" 

Captain L. H. Dunham 

First Lieut J. A. Chase 

Second Lieut W. P. Beaubien 

Company "B" 

Captain B. H . Decker 

First Lieut E. Shelby 

Second I jeut ' K. Bell 



Company "C 

Captain E. R. P. Rall 

First Lieut L. E. Lamkins 

Second Lieut B. W. Fairbanks 

Company "D" 

Captain W. K. Norris 

First Lieut Geo. Curtiss 

Second Lieut W. W. Sheldon 



SECOND BATTALION 

Major .. J • C - ' Iostetler 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant R - E. Denz 

Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster R. L. Schiesswohl 

Sergeant Major -J- H - Powers 



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Company "E' : 

Captain R. R. Zipprodt 

First Lieut D. E. Miller 

Second Lieut. W. L. RoHLFING 

Company "F" 

Captain 1- R. Cline 

First Lieut W. H. Hough 

Second Lieut. E. C. Swartout 



Company "G" 

Captain A. II. Huisken 

First Lieut R. V. Waller 

Second Lieut L. R. Lumi.ey 

Company "II" 

Captain ' C. A. Nebel 

First Lieut F. M. Van Natter 

Second Lieut C. N. OWEN 



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THIRD BATTALION 

Major o^^/ 001 ' 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant R- S. Mason 

Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster O. J. Troster 

Sergeant Major --P- Calhoun 



Company "I" 

Captain A. M. Baker 

First Lieut E. F. Pihlgard 

Second Lieut O. C. K. Hutchinson 

Company "K" 

Captain M. E. Slater 

First Lieut R. D. Barnes 

Second Lieut K. S. Stice 



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Company "U 

Captain L. E. Thorne 

First Lieut M. C. Johnson 

Second Lieut A. G. Steinmayer 

Company "M" 

Captain J- H. Miller 

First Lieut A. M. Kircher 

Second Lieut L. E. Mulac 



SECOND REGIMENT 

Lieutenant Colonel Commanding W. C. Armstrong 

Captain and Adjutant (; - ll - Butler 

Captain and Quartermaster E. A. James 

Regimental Sergeant Major -V. H. Grossiserg 

Regimental Quartermaster Sergeant -M. Heath 

Regimental Commissary Sergeant H. L. Husson 

Regimental Color Sergeant W. L. Crawford 



rgeant. 
FIRST BATTALION 



Major. 



„C. F. Hood 



First Lieutenant and Adjutant R. Steinmayer 

Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster H. T. Rogers 

Sergeant Major D- D - Sharer 



Company "A" 

Captain C. L. Ritts 

First Lieut C. W. McCumber 

Second Lieut G. S. Sciialler 

Company "B" 

Captain D. C. Sciieele 

First Lieut D. W. Crane 

Second Lieut C. W. Lenzing 



Company "C 

Captain G. D. Griswold 

First Lieut E. C. O. Beatty 

Second Lieut J. G. Eppinger 

Company "D" 

Captain C. W. Lincoln 

First Lieut E. W. Noxon 

Second Lieut L.C. J. North 



SECOND BATTALION 

Major L. D. Knapp 

First Lieutenant and Adjutant R. R. Thomas 

Second Lieutenant and Quartermaster L. W. Reese 

Sergeant Major F. A- Logan 



Company "E" 

Captain ...E. R. Dillavou 

First Lieut A. G. Stone 

Second Lieut L. S. Morrill 

Company "F" 

Captain S. S. Davis 

First Lieut J. H. Gage 

Second Lieut P. D. Amsbary 

Signal Corps 
Captain L. C. Bow 



Company "G" 

Captain R. Niver 

First Lieut J. E. Fetiierston 

Second Lieut H. P. Greison 

Company "H" 

Captain H . E. Barde x 

First Lieut R. W. Millar 

Second Lieut R. F. Harvey 

Battery 
Captain M. E. Hoit 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 





The society of the National Reserve Corps was formed by the students 
attending the Military Instruction Camps in the summer of 1913 at Gettysburg, 
Pennsylvania and Momterey, California. The resultant success of these camps 
encouraged the Secretary of War and the Chief of Staff to go on with the 
project in 1914. The Illinois branch of the Society of the National Reserve 
Corps was formed in October, 1914. Its membership is composed of those men 
who have attended one of these camps held during the past two years The 
majority of the members attended the camp which was located at Ludmgton, 
Michigan during the summer of 1914. The Illinois delegation at the Ludmgton 
Camp wa's composed of fifteen students ; the largest delegation sent by any of the 
large Western Universities. The pleasure and benefit which this camp afforded 
these students made a permanent organization seem desirable, the object of which 
would be to perpetuate the system of student military instruction camps and to 
encourage a large attendance from the University of Illinois. 

President James is taking an active interest in the summer camp proposition, 
which he believes will make better and stronger citizens out of the students who 
attend He is a member of the advisory board of University Presidents, whose 
purpose is to further the development of these camps. To increase the student 
interest in these camps, he has seen fit to allow students attending one of these 
camps, two credits toward the fulfillment of their military requirements at the 
University of Illinois. 




214 



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UMOtS 

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 



L 




President James Reviewing the Brigade 

(SLtfmptftitito Pag 

May 27th was the annual military competitive day. This was the day set 
aside by the department for the various competitions which are held every year. 
Lieutenant Colonel C. G. Davis and Captain E. H. Dnmvan of the 6th Illinois 
National Guard, with Lieutenant B. W. Phillips of the 14th U. S. Infantry, 
acted as judges for the department on this occasion 

The individual competitives, the first events of the day, took place on Illi- 
nois field, Sergeant Major E. Shelby winning the University Gold Medal for the 
best drilled sophomore and Private L. H. Gift winning the Hazelton Medal for 
the best drilled freshman. The competitions between the Signal Corps and the 
Artillery detachments were the next on the program. The other events of the day 
took place on the South campus, the sophomore company competitive being the 
first of these. Company "C", commanded by E. L. Hasker, took the laurels on 
this occasion. The freshmen battalions were the next to compete against each 
other The third battalion, under the command of Major P. C. Rich, won this 

event. As a final event of the day, the twelve 
freshman companies drilled in keen compe- 
tition. Company "C", commanded by Captain 
Bublitz, won this event. 

ARTILLERY COMPETITIVE 
First Sergeant S. N. Vibelious' detachment 

SIGNAL CORPS COMPETITIVE 
Sergeant F. H. Williams' Flag detachment 
Sergeant C. M. Brentlinger's Key detachment 
Sergeant R. W. Morgan's Wireless detachment 

WINNING COMPANY RIFLE TEAM 
Company "C", Third Battalion 

Captain H. S. Mueller 

Rifle Team 

D.E.Miller H. F. Wanderer L.M.Bailey 
A. D. Little J.H.Gage 

215 




SHELBY JOHNSON MILLER 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 



fomhtg Company uf % #qji)mttarc (Bmnpetttfoc 



Ca Ptain g. L. Hasker 

First Lieutenant J. Q Hostetler 



Second Lieutenant E. J Bartz 

First Sergeant ...w. j|. Hough 



L. E. Lam kins W. L. Parish 



SERGEANTS 
R. S. Scholl W. P. Beaubien C. W. Lenzing 



n - _ _ CORPORALS 

1. S. Simmons A. B. Keller ]|. w. Lindsay 

C. B. Haskett 



J. G. Allen 
V. W. Behel 
L. B. Boyd 

P. BreCount 
O. M. Durns 

C. E. Cooper 
B. N. Culmer 
H. R. Davis 

F. L. Dougherty 
H. J. Donaldson 

D. Downey 

F. E. Dunlap 
O. M. Fuller 
K. Geisendorfer 



P. H. Graves 

W. W. Gunk el 
S. Hansen 
G. li. Hartman 
I. B. Hedgcock 
W. W. Hixon 

F. J. A. Hoehn 
C. R. Howe 

H. L. HUMPIDGE 

E. G. Johnson 
H. J. Johnson 

G. C. Klippel 
K. Koepke 

P. G. KUHNEN 



J. H. McCoRMACK 

PRIVATES 

G. Lanan 
A. H. Lenz 

F. W. Martin 

G. E. Melin 
R. L. Moses 
H. L. Mueller 
R. H. Nixon 

T. I. Patterson 
P. T. Primm 
D. W. Probst 

F. W. Ramey 

G. L. Rigg 

W. O. Roessler 
G. S. Roqers 



R. W. Ruth 



G. W. Sallee 

E. SCHAEFFER 

R. F. Shaffer 
G. W. Smith 
G. E. Sterling 

H. F. Sutton 
I. A. Tate 
W. W. Trantow 
W. G. Tuell 
J. W. Watson 

R. N. WlLFORD 
M. WOLTER 

G, A. Wrisley 



Jfoedpram (Cirnqniittfte 



C a Ptain W j BuiiL]TZ 

iMrst Lieutenant „ L. H. Dunham 



it niters 



E. W. Noxon 
C. N. Owen 



Second Lieutenant \. H. Huisken 

First Sergeant E. C. O. Beatty 



L J. Rust 



SERGEANTS 

L. W. Reese 



Bayard Brown 



W. E. Baker 
H. C. Coleman 



D. A. Albrecht 
A Arends 

H. S. Arnold 
C. Bocock 

E. Bohrn 
C. A. Britt 
M. E. Canady 

B. J. Carius 

F. C. Cargill 
J. Cartrill 

R. W. Cochran 
R. E. Copper 

C. Crofts 

G. CULLINANE 

M. Darby 
L. Day 



CORPORALS 
L E. Herget C. A. Klein 

W. H. BonDurant J. H. Needler 



C P. Dick 
P. A. Dudley 

D. M. Elliott 
W. B. Ewer 
II. R. Ferguson 
II. B. Fites 
W. S. Frazier 
G. M. Gehant 
G. T. Gore 
D. Grover 
T. Hamilton 
S. 1). Hakwood 
K. L. Helper 

J. HlRSTEIN 

C. II. Hudelson 
M. C. Hughes 



PRIVATES 

J. N. Johnson 

I. JoRSTAl) 

F. E. Kier 

A. R. KlNSEY 

N. A. Knudsen 
M. Leach 
S. T. Lurie 
W. McCaughey 
M. McElveen 
F. B. Macomber 
D. Magruder 

II. E. Mueller 
J. Newar 

W. NORDENHOI.T 

P. W. Ott 

C. Palmer 



O. C. Mark well 



II. Pendarvis 
H. Porter 
R. Raaberg 
H. Rathhurn 
E. Richolson 
L. Roedel 
II. Shank 
C. Shearer 

E. F. Shelley 
L. Smith 

R. Sundell 

IX Swain 

G. W. Teasdale 

F. Walker 
L. B. Walsh 
II. Wiley 

E. Win it k 



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216 



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kartell Affairs 



UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 

junior $rom 

In the midst of a gar- 
den of flowers, under the 
soft mellow light of the 
evening, the music com- 
ing- from a bower con- 
cealed in a thick mass of 
foliage, the dull cares of 
the class of 1916 were 
danced away before their 
annual Junior Prome- 
nade. The old armory 
is but a sordid name for 
the beautiful paradise 
into which it had been 
transformed by the can- 
opy of smilax and roses 
whic h overhung the 
dance floor, and follow- 
ing the walls, formed a 

in a Z"y snow ball fight while live snow birds new to cover in tie lalbng flakes. 





R. E. Denz 

Chairman of the Committee 



D W. Crane 
President of the Class 




218 



s^T/CTx 



7/70/5 *-■ — 

UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 



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BARBER PETERSON BEBI) SHOEMAKER 

HART PRUETT MILLER LUMLEY SUTTON 

MEALIFF HUNTINGTON GRABBE ROHLFING ROBINSON 

•RIS BEAL MITCHELL DENZ H1RTH CRANE 



Old Armory 
December n, 19 14 



THE COMMITTEE 



MC KEON 

BEAUBIEN 
FRIER CURTISS 

THOMPSON BROOKS 



D. W. Crane, 
R. E. Denz, 



President 
Chairman 



Lillian Thompson 
Grace Mitchell 
Laura Hirth 
Fern Harris 
W. W. Hart 
H. I. Huntington 
W. H. Beal 

F. Bebb 

R. H. Brooks 

G. Curtiss 
W. Beaubien 
T. Miller 



A. W. Robinson 
j. K. Barber 
J. C. Grabbe 
F. H. Sutton 
J. M. McKeon 
L. R. Lumley 
E. F. Pruett 
W. C. Peterson 

W. L. ROHLFING 

A. E. Mealiff 
T. W. Shoemaker 
J. Frier 





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HOPKINS 



BABCOCK 



GAY STRINGER WOLTMAN 

MOFFETT MCNULTA THOMAS HEINEKE COLTON RUELING 

KOHN BROWNING CUNNINGHAM OTTO NEWLIN 



Old Armory 
January 8, 191 5 

THE COMMITTEE 

T. S. Browning, President 

S. R. Cunningham, Chairman 

Ralph Newlin Gordon Otto 

E. C. Hopkins F. R. Babcock 

S. J. Thomas J- K. Stringer 

Scott McNulta Paul Heineke 

E. T. Colton Ernest Gay 

L W. WOLTMAN C. W. REULING 

J. L. KOHN D. R. MOFFETT 



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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 



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J. N. Greene 
Commander or the Brigade 



E. C. Elles 
Chairman of the Committee 



The eighteenth annual Military Ball was ushered in with real military style 
by the roar of cannon, the roll of drums, and the blare of trumpets. Hardly had 
they ceased when the color sergeants presented the Brigade coors, after which 
with military precision the Grand March was started. The column was led by 
Cadet Colonel Joseph N. Greene and Miss Laura Wise of Staunton, Virginia, 
followed by the commissioned officers of the corps and the cadets in their gray 
and black uniforms. ,, 

The Armory had been transformed into a garden of green foliage as a back- 
ground for a myriad of American flags draped in an artistic fashion. Over each 
of the twenty-four booths was a great golden eagle on a gilded globe and outlined 
in colors red, white and blue. It was a fitting setting for the dancers in the 
cadet gray and braided uniforms and shiny, clanking sabers m contrast to the 
beautiful gowns of their partners. 

Throughout the entire program of twenty-two dances the same digmhed 
splendor of military formality prevailed. The caterers had carefully worked out 
military design in the refreshments which were served between the eleventh and 
twelfth dances. The ball was a delightful occasion in every respect and testihed 
to the well directed efforts of Colonel Greene and Major Elles. 



222 




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UNIVERSITY ACTIVI 



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JUDSON 
MCEVOY LEWIS 

KAPP REESE 

RUELING SHARER 



LINDSEY 



CLAYTON 



LICHTER BRITT MC CABF. 

TOBST OTT LOVELL CITIZEN FERGUSON LAWRENCE 

LES GREFNE WEBSTER GRUNEWALD ARMSTRONG CURTISS BESS 

GROSS OTTO WARE MC KEOWN 



GILBERT 



Jttlttar^ Pall 

Armory 

February 19. 1915 

COMMITTEE 



Major E. C. Eli 
Major F. D. Webster, U. S. A. 
Colonel J. N. Greene 
Lieut. Colonel A. H. Grunewald 
Lieut. Colonel W. C. Armstrong 
Major E. C. Elles 
ist Lieutenant George Curtiss 
2nd Lieutenant L. W. Reese 
Sergeant Major D. D. Sharer 
ist Sergeant H. R. Ferguson 
ist Sergeant H. R. Jobst 
ist Sergeant M. B. Ware 
ist Sergeant M. M. Lovell 
ist Sergeant C. C. Citizen 
ist Sergeant J. E. Ott 
Q. M. Sergeant R. H. Lawrence 
Sergeant H. M. Martin 

C. A. Peterson 



,es, Chairman 

Sergeant G. J. Page 
Sergeant J. R. Lindsey 
Sergeant F. M. Judson 
Sergeant B. H. Lichter 
Sergeant J. T. Lewis 
Sergeant H. L. Clayton 
Sergeant R. L. McKown 
Sergeant A. A. Gilbert 
Sergeant T. T. McEvoy 
Sergeant C. W. Reuling 
Sergeant C. Gross 
Sergeant L. T. McCabe 
Private Gordon Otto 
Private R. L. Britt 
J. H. Rapp, ist Reg. Band 
S. J. Bess, 2nd Reg. Band 

, Drum Corps 



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223 




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UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES 




WILSON LUMLEY ROMINE 

CADISCH GAYLE GLASSCO H. N. AINSWORTH SACKRISON ANDERSON 

MILLS DAVIS CHAMBERS 



H. G. AINSWORTH 



GRAVES 



Old Armory 
November 20, 1914 



COMMITTEE 

S. S. Davis, President 
W. H. Chambers, Chairman 



H. G. Ainsworth 
H. N. Ainsworth 
W. F. Anderson 
G. Cadisch 
R. E. Gayle 
R. T. Glassco 



F. W. Graves 
J. F. Hedgcock 

L. R. LUMLEY 

J. T. Mills 
T. F. Romine 
T. A. Sackrison 



W. W. Wilson 



224 



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A T II L li T 1 C S 



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ATHLETICS 




PROr. &00DtN<OGH DfLAN RICHARDS 



CHUFF 




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ATHLETIC 

BOARD" 
CONTKL 



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FF-RGU5°N 



M'tAUGHtY 



DLAN hARKLR 



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RAY&URN 



DE1ARMAN 



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ATHLETICS 



Barrett Rogers President 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 
George A. Huff 

ATHLETIC BOARD OF CONTROL 

FACULTY MEMBERS 

Prof. G. A. Goodenougii Prof. J. W. Richards 

Dean O. A. Harker Director G. A. Huff 

student members 

Barrett Rogers President 

C. M. Ferguson Secretary and Baseball Manager 

A. B. Rayburn Football Manager 

H. W. Deakman Track Manager 

R. C. Swope , Interscholastic Manager 

F. W. Postel Circus Manager 

G. E. McGaughey Inter-Class Manager 

BOARD OF CLASS ATHLETICS 
G. C. Faurote Senior Class 

F. D. Griffith Junior Class 

J. L. Brown Sophomore Class 

G. Ranney Freshman Class 




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A T II I- ET I C S 



Irihc of % |Uint 



Established Tpi / 



COLORS — Orange and Bine 



OFFICERS 



Andrew Baker Ham mitt.. 
Sidney Casner 



President 
Secretary 



L. Arbuckle 

L. E. Armstrong 
}. T. Bradley 
N. D. Belnap 
Frank Bane 
G. S. Beaumont 
O. R. Clements 
E. A. Claar 
Dudley Crane 
H. F. Cogdall 
R. D. Chapman 
George Clark 
J. D. Culp 

D. E. Currier 
S. R. Derby 

SVEN DUNER 

E. Fisher 
J. L. Fish 

J. M. Griffin 
W. W. Gunkel 
P. Ft. Graves 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIX 
Ralph Green 
W. A. Goelitz 
M. HolmburgeRj Jr. 

E. P. FlOHMAN 

W. H. Halas 

G. H. Husted 

A. B. Ham mitt 

W. E. Kreps 

H. J. Kirch er 

L. L. Larson 

A. P. McDonald, Jr. 

D. McRobie 
J. L. McKeown 
A. H. Mason 
H. B. McCluggage 
O. Mads en 
F. B. Macomber 
O. J. Murray 
O. A. Lansche 
H. A. Pogue 

E. F. Pruett 
J. H. Rapp 



ERSITY 

}. C. Stirton 
R. N. Petty 

A. H. POLAKOW 

Orlie Rue 
r. L. Rush 

F. 1 1. Pethybridge 
R. Sieisens 
F. Senneff 
Schobinger 

M. SlLKMAN 

Stewart 

G. K. Squier 

L. D. TlLTON 
J. O. TUPPER 

G. H. Tapping 
R. E. Thomas 
N. II. Wright 

I. W. Watson 
A. Wagner 

E. A. WlLLIFORD 

R. T. Welsh 



A. 
G. 
E. 

1. 
F. 




230 




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ATHLETICS 







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A T II L E T 1 C S 



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Robert C. Zuppke 
(Coach) 



Uaesttu Jfaortlrall 



%mm ai 1914 

OFFICERS 

Robert C. Zuppke 
Coach 

JUSTA M. LlNDGREN 

Assistant Coach 

Ralph D. Chapman 
Captain 

Allan B. Rayburn 
Manager 




I 



Allan B. Rayburn 
(Manager) 



PERSONNEL 

Perry Henry Graves Right End 

Man lev Ross Petty Right Tackle 

Frank Stewart Right Guard 

John Ward Nelson Right Guard 

John Wesley Watson Center 

Ralph Dwyer Clinton Chapman (Captain) Left Guard 

Lennox Francois Armstrong Left Tackle 

Olav Madsen Left Tackle 

Sylvester Randall Derby Left End 

George Kasson Squier Left End 

George Clark Quarter-back 

Franklin Bartlett Macomber Right half-back 

Frank Howard Petiiybridge Right half-back 

Eugene Schobinger Full-back 

Orlie Rue Full-back 

Alexander Wagner Left half-back 

Harold Austin Pogue Left half-back 



ILLINOIS. 37 

ILLINOIS 51 

ILLINOIS 37 

ILLINOIS 33 

ILLINOIS 21 

ILLINOIS 21 

ILLINOIS 24 



GAMES 

Christian Brothers o 

Indiana o 

Ohio State o 

Northwestern o 

Minnesota 6 

Chicago 7 

Wisconsin Q 



Urbana, Oct. 3 
Urbana, Oct. 10 
Urbana, Oct. 17 
Evanston, Oct. 24 
Minneapolis, Oct. 31 
Urbana, Nov. 7 
Madison, Nov. 21 



224 



Totals 



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ATHLETICS 



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Jtetuem of tlyc aHjampionsljiy Jffoothetll 
^teasott of 1914 

spectacular ever wnnesse,nhCon^n^ the g ^ ^ Conference 

a clear and ^ d ^^^J^ v ^ :^n the start of the season along in 
gridiron teams which t hej ■ "i tu ^ ^^ among 

team standing alone at the top of he con e re nee a ,ng 1 he i J 4 
accomplished what Ilhnois baseball and ^^^^pSplcts for the 
time With Zuppke's promise to remain with us foi live years, pica i 

twenty-first of September Zuppke and Liiv1g.cn appealed on tnene . 

SiSSE. ''V 1 ,,; JL5»d «ho Ug h «a^; "-Ta 

the Illini backers a feeling of confidence. 







Crowd on the 




West Bleachers at thi Chicago Game 

234 





s<#£7; 



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ATHLETICS 



With a week's hard drill, the followers of Zuppke were ready to meet the 
team^om Indtnl The game proved to be a slow one for after there eree 
hw hU whistle the outcome of the game was evident. The work of Fotsy 
Chrk at qua terback d serves special mention. Pogue, who was now playing 
S the half back, position, clearly showed that he had forgotten none of his last 

^t^S^2^^^^^ institution was played October 
seventeenth ^ They pufup a clean, hard game of football and Illinois was kep 
Ther toes thruout the contest. Perry Graves played his first game of the year 
hed ran down punts in great style. "Barf Macomber put up as 

nrettv an exhibition of kicking as has been seen on Illinois Field for many days. 
His to was n sponsible for thirteen points. Pogue made long gains every time 
S took "h ball Clark directed the team well and cleverly intercepted two 
forward passes. When the game ended Illinois had run up 37 points to hei 
opponent's none. ^ ^ first ^ f h 

The gin whh Northwestern proved to be a shut-out for the Mini, who easily 
i iledm^ Points "Bart" Macomber played quarterback and made severa 
pe^tac^laf run°s fo; touchdowns. "Dutch" Wagner al so ^added « points toward 
the total when he scored a touchdown from a pass by Bait. The woik ol Kue 
stands out prominently, as well as does that of Pethybndge and Real, who were 

Playi Tle th S tad r ;Vt^y b two players journeyed to Minneapolis the following 
week, and in the hardest game of the year crushed the Gophers n a 21 to 6 
score The game was fast and hard, and the two teams fought foi three quar 
? and ndther were able to score. In the fourth quarter a triple pass Macomber 
to Clark to Squier, started things for the Mini and "Cap 'carried the ball within 
five yards of the goal. In the next play Clark dodged thru center for a touch- 
down Harold Pogue then pulled off two spectacular runs, each of which ended 
in a touchdown. 





L - 



The Crowd on the East Bleachers 
235 




F 



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A T 11 L E T 1 C S 



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Two weeks' rest, spent in hard drill, put die team in first-class shape for 
Chicago. This game was played before the largest crowd ever on Illinois Field. 
There was intense interest in the outcome of the game for neither team had been 
defeated. At the end of the first half Chicago was ahead although Zuppke's 
machine had gained more ground. The Maroon leader had made a beautiful 
kick which prompted a march through our ranks for their only touchdown. 
Then Illinois braced, our line became impenetrable, Captain Chapman and Wat- 
son played like demons. The Illini uncorked all of the tricks of their budget, 
while I'ogue and Clark brought the stands to their feet with their sensational 
runs. The game ended with Chicago humbled, leaving the rejoicing Illini with 
the big end of the 21 to 7 score. 

The last game was played at Madison. Interest was high, for it was still 
necessary for Illinois to defeat the Badgers in order to keep their own slate clean, 
and to save a triple tie for the Conference Championship. Captain Chapman, 
Armstrong, Graves, Schobinger, Rue, Wagner, and Derby were serving Illinois 
for the last time on the gridiron. Pogue gets the credit for making two touch- 
downs, while Clark in a sensational run through the entire Wisconsin team, 
scored the third. The game was particularly characterized by the perfect team 
work of the team which had now gained the much sought for title — The Big 
Nine Champions. 

Too much cannot be said in praise of our coaches, Zuppke and Lindgren. 
They instilled the "never give up" spirit into every member of the triumphant 
Illini. The working together of the entire squad to make up a perfect machine 
was the result of their industry. 

A. B. Rayburn. 



I 




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The Squad 
236 



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ATHLETICS 



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RALPH DWYER CLINTON CHAPMAN 

"Slooey" Chapman, captain of the triumphant Illini eleven 
of 1914, was the unanimous choice as All Western Guard, 
and was placed by Walter Camp on his honorary All 
American team, as the greatest guard of the season. 
Ralph learned football at Washington, D. C, while attend- 
ing the Central High School. We know Chapman for his 
speed aggressiveness, and fighting spirit. He has been the 
bulwark of defense in the line and few opponents have 
succeeded in getting by him. His ability and head work 
has made him an ideal man for Zuppke s style of open 
play. With his graduation, Illinois loses a player who 
has ever been a true sportsman and a peerless leader. 




JOHN WESLEY 
WATSON 

"Jack" is Captain-elect 
of the 1915 Illinois foot- 
ball machine. He came 
from De Kalb, and was 
immediately successful in 
landing a berth on the 
Freshman Varsity. His 
brother was a regular on 
the Varsity at the time, 
so football seems to run 
in his blood. "Watty" 
has played regularly on 
the Varsity ever since, 
and because of his con- 

a^ drV^ttason his teammates elected him c, f U« In J ^J^ggf 
everybody has noticed his "pepper", and we are sure that Jack will again pilot /.up 
Indians through a championship season. 




L 



EUGENE SCHOBINGER 

After a year on the Freshman Varsity, 
"Schobe" earned his position as a Varsity 
regular and has maintained it throughout the 
three years of his eligibility. He is an all 
around athlete of no mean ability, for besides 
being one of the main-stays of Zuppke's cham- 
pions, he holds a position on the water polo 
team and has the honor of captaining this 
year's track team. When a gain of a few yards 
was necessary, "Gene" was always the man to 
be relied upon and it was seldom indeed that 
his weight and speed did not carry him safely 
through the opposing defense. Of no less 
importance was the phenomenal manner in 
which he made interference for the other back 
field runners. All in all Illinois has had few 
better fullbacks, and the position left vacant 
by his graduation will surely be hard to fill. 



237 



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ATHLETICS 



LENNOX FRANCOIS ARMSTRONG 

"Army" Armstrong was a student of Zuppke at 
Oak Park and did not have hard sailing to win his 
herth on the fast stepping Illini team. He has played 
two years, first as an end and this year as tackle. 
Armstrong has the gift of speed and ability to keep 
on his feet. He was a sure and hard tackier and did 
not seem to find it hard to get through the opponents' 
line and nail the runner before he had even started 
to gain. Armstrong is another senior, whose va- 
cancy will be hard to fill. 



=fi 




ALEXANDER WAGNER 

"Cut in" Wagner was one of the hardest fighters and work- 
ers on the team. He graduated from University High, and 
came to Illinois and made good on the 1915 Freshman 
Varsity, of which he was captain. He has played three years 
of Varsity football, fighting all the time for his place as 
half-back. "Dutch" is adept at carrying the pigskin and his 
twisting and squirming makes him a hard man to catch or 
hold after once tackled. He is another one of those who 
have served us for the last time on the gridiron and by his 
graduation Illinois loses a natural born football player, a hard 
and consistent worker. 

ORLIE RUE 

Orlie has been known as the hard luck man of the year. Although 
half sick most of the time, he came out every day and fought his 
hardest for the team. He is a very fast player, and dashes down the 
field giving interference or straight thru an opening in the line for a 
long gain. He shared with "Schobe" the responsibility of gaining a few 
yards in case of a much needed fourth down. Orlie is from Mattoon, 
and spent his first year on the Freshman Varsity. He is another senior 
we are to lose, and one whose loss will 
be keenly felt by the students as well as 
the players, for his determined spirit 
and unlimited supply of nerve will long 
be remembered by all loyal Illini. 

SYLVESTER RANDALL DERBY 

Derby and Squier proved to be an 
unbeatable combination for left end, 
and between the two of them the posi- 
tion was handled in great style. Two 
years of Varsity football had given 
"Derb" some valuable experience and 

enabled him to hold down the end position like a veteran. 

Hard work and determined perseverance characterised his 

playing throughout the season. The manner in which he ran 

down under punts and nailed his opponents before they start- 
ed, was especially evident in the Minnesota game and deserves 

special mention. "Derb" graduates in June and his loss will 

be keenly felt by all who are interested in football at 

Illinois. 





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PERRY HENRY GRAVES 

"Pez" is an old Rockford star. He also played on the University of 
Pittsburg team and was captain of the 1916 Illinois Freshman Varsity. 
His reputation as being one of the fastest ends at the game was re- 
peatedly demonstrated. He is a small and light player, but his football 
intuition, and his habit of catching a forward pass as he would a base- 
ball, has made him a favorite among the football fans. In selecting 
Perry as All Western end, Patterson comments upon him as follows : 
"Graves of Illinois was the best end in the west. He is faster than the 
proverbial flash, a sure tackier and a good man at sizing up a play." 





GEORGE CLARK 
"Potsy" Clark, of Carthage, 
played a year on the Williams 
and Vashti team before he 
came to Illinois. He is the 
quickest little general in the 
west and well deserves his 

laurels as All Western quarterback. His judgment 
of plays and the time to use them, gave him the ab- 
solute confidence of his team-mates. As an open 
field runner he was the equal of Pogue and some- 
where has acquired the peculiar habit of grabbing 
the ball from a kick off or punt, and then running 
straight down the field for a touchdown. His ninety 
yard sprint through the entire Chicago team at 
Homecoming will never be forgotten by the Illini 
fans. He will play again next year and his past 
experience should make him a 
season's success. 



HAROLD AUSTIN POGUE 
"The greatest open field runner Illinois has yet produced" is the 
smallest, nerviest, and fleetest player on the team. "Poguie's" first 
football experience was on a championship high school team down at 
Sullivan. In his first year at Illinois he played on the championship 
class team and this year on the undisputed champions of the Confer- 
ence. From the point of view of the enemy, Harold has one bad habit, 
for in every conference game in which he has played, he has chalked 
up at least one touchdown for Illinois. He closes this season with 
a record of ten touchdowns. Patterson, in making his choice for All 
Western half-back says : "Pogue is an ideal man for the present game; 
fast, elusive, and always quick to take advantage of even the smallest 
openings. He is one of the smartest players of the year, and his eye is 
always looking for the main chance." 



FRANKLIN BARTLETT 
MACOMBER 





"Bart" played his first year of col- 
lege football in great style. He had 
gained an enviable reputation on 
"Zup's" Oak Park championship 

prep team. Bart did not have any trouble in living up to 
the dope, and his weight, determination and speed made 
him a wonderful half-back. His long punts and place 
kicks always made him feared in the rival camps. His 
total of scoring 62 points for the season speaks for itself. 
In the Minnesota game he out-punted Hamilton, the oppos- 
ing kicker, and again in the Wisconsin game his punts out- 
distanced those of the veteran, Bellows, whose reputation 
as a kicker had placed him on last year's All Western. 
Bart will wear the orange and blue for two years more 
and much is expected of him. 




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MANLEY ROSS PETTY 

Ross was one of the largest men 
on the team and a player of marked 
ability. He comes to us from War- 
saw township High School, and 
seemed to have little trouble in learn- 
ing Zup's style of play. Although 
handicapped by several injuries he 
refused to become discouraged, and 
few spectators failed to notice the 
brilliant work which he has shown 
in every game that he was able to 
enter. With one vear's varsity ex- 
perience, and two more years to play, 
Illinois will not have to worry in re- 
gard to how the right guard position 
is to be played. 



GEORGE KASSON SQUIER 

"Cap" is a junior in the University and has played 
his first year of varsity football. He comes to us from 
Rock ford, a town which has a reputation for the con- 
tributions it has made to the gridiron. As one of the 
tallest men on the western gridiron, Squier has made an 
enviable reputation in receiving forward passes. To 
"Cap" is given the credit of starting the spurt that was 
to bury Minnesota and to win for the Indians their 
hardest fought battle. He is at home on the football 
field and has never yet failed to outplay every opponent 
he has encountered. He has figured in all of the All 
Western selections of the year, and with the experience 
he has gained he should make a strong bid for All 
American honors next fall. 





FRANK HOWARD PETHYBRIDGE 

The half-back position was one of the hardest fought for places on 
the team this year. Pethvbridge, though small and competing with 
veterans, proved his worth in the Northwestern game. He is very 
fast and runs low and hard. Such bard work as he has gone through 
this year will give him invaluable experience in the future. He played 
on tlie 1917 freshman team and has two more years to compete for the 
Indians. With his natural ability and determination, lie will finish 
football as a veteran. 



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on the 
of his 
played 

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JOHN WARD NELSON 

1 Ward was unknown to football followers before this fall, and it 
was through his hard work and readiness to profit by the teachings 
of Lindgren and Zuppke, that he developed into a fast, heady, football 
player. He comes from Industry township high school at Vermont, 
Illinois and with two more years of Varsity football ahead of him, 
he should develop into one of the best players in the Conference. 

FRANK STEWART 

Frank Stewart is another player to glide from the freshman Varsity 

ranks into a place on the 

Illini Varsity. . Frank is 

endowed with both speed 

and weight. These two 

points combined in proper 

proportion are a great help 

to any football player, and 

especially to a guard. Stew- 
art was the heaviest player 
team, and it was seldom indeed that any 
opponents got thru or around him. lie 
like a veteran all season, and will be a 
ank in "Bob's" football platform for next 





OLAV MADSEN 

Madsen is the only man who won his "I" on 
this year's team who is not a native son of Illi- 
nois." He hails from Litchfield, Minnesota, where 
he starred on the local high school team. He 
played on the Freshman Varsity of 1916, where 
he "first learned the Illini motto of "never say- 
die." He fights from start to finish. He is a 
large, heavy man, quiet and fearless, and plays 
with a dash that is felt and long remembered by 
his opponents. "01" has convincingly demon- 
strated his worth, and next year should prove a 
stellar player. 




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George A. Huff Coach 

John C. Phelps Capt. 

N. McKay KNEiSLEV.Mgr 




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George A. Huff 
Coach 



Nathaniel McK. Knf.isi.y 
Manager 



John C. Phelps Center Field 

Ira Rush Short Stop 

Leon Arbuckle Left Field 

Frank M. Bane First Base 

John T. Bradley Catcher 

Douglas McRobie Right Field 

Harry F. Cogdall Second Base 

Woodward \V. Gunkei Pitcher 

Walter H. Halas * Pitcher 

Wilbur E. Krebs Third Base 

Perry H. Graves Third Base 



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Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 
Illinois 



RECORD OF THE GAMES PLAYED 

n Alabama 5 

2 Georgia Tech. 5 

2 Georgia Tech. 3 

1 University of Georgia 2 

! University of Tennessee 1 

2 University of Kentucky 1 4 

5 Northwestern 4 

8 Millikin 5 

4 Minnesota 3 

o. Purdue 6 

3 Texas 2 

7 Texas 3 

7 Purdue o 

2 Wisconsin 1 

3 Chicago 4 



.Northwestern o 



2 Indiana 13 

2 Wisconsin 5 

4 Chicago 3 



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The record of the University of Illinois varsity haseball team for 1914 was 
one of the most peculiar ever presented by an athletic team representing the 
University. About the middle of April "the boards of strategy", located in the 
favorite loafing places about the Twin Cities, had handed down the ultimatum 
that Illinois would make a poor tail-ender. But 1914 was a year of miracle 
baseball teams and Illinois seems to have been destined to introduce this custom; 
for from a losing team in April, through the untiring efforts of the men in the 
uniforms and their everlasting spirit of fight, and under the marvelous tutelage 
of the peer of coaches, "Gee" Huff, a baseball team was developed that was able 
to bring home the Conference championship on the 29th of May. 

The season was started with a trip to the "Sunny South" after but a few 
days of outdoor practice and with a squad of a few veterans and an abundance 
of recruits. Although some of the scores of the games in the South were not 
pleasant to remember, nevertheless these games provided the important test to 
the material and pointed out the places where the team should be strengthened 
before the start of the Conference schedule. 

Upon return the team was entirely reorganized, the weak places were 
strengthened, and a routine of strenuous practice put into effect. The Confer- 
ence season was opened with a victory over the Methodists at Evanston. Then 
came the first game on Illinois Field with Millikin University, in which the 
Illinois team defeated the visitors from Decatur by a score of 8-5. With 
"Bunny" Gunkle in the box for the first time on Illinois Field, Minnesota was 
disposed of by a score 4-3 ; and but a few days later Capt. Phelps' followers 
defeated the Boilermakers on the Purdue diamond. This was followed by two 
of the prettiest games of the season, namely, the games with the University of 
Texas. Although the Texans lost both games, they played an excellent variety 
of baseball. After handing Purdue another defeat, the Illini journeyed to Madi- 
son, where in a hard fought tussle they defeated the Badgers. 




A Timely Three Bagger 



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ATHLETICS 

During Interscholastic, before record breaking crowds, the Illini shared 
honors with Chicago; taking one game from Northwestern, and allowing the 
Maroons a victory, even though "Slip" Cogdall was hitting in true Ty Cobb 
style. This was followed by a slump in team work and batting by the Orange 
and Blue team, during which they dropped one game with the Hoosiers and 
another with Wisconsin, both on the home grounds. 

Thus, the outlook for winning the final game with the Maroons was not 
the most encouraging. Chicago was by all odds the favorite — by many they 
had been conceded the Championship. The afternoon of the game was another 
great discouragement because of a rainstorm that started about one thirty. The 
diamond would have been an admirable spot to stage a water polo contest; but 
nevertheless the game was started. Illinois scored the first run only to have it 
taken away because the umpire changed his decision. This seemed to put more 
fight into the team and they played as never before during the season. Halas 
pitched an extraordinary game, and even though the diamond was conducive to 
errors Capt. Phelps' men played errorless ball. When the last man was out in 
the second half of the ninth inning the score board showed that the Illini had 
triumphed by a score of 4-3 ; Coach Huff's men had succeeded in bringing the 
Championship of the Western Intercollegiate Athletic Conference back to their 
Alma Mater. N. McK. Kneisly. 




The Squad 



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JOHN CARNE PHELPS 

"Butts" captained the Illini Baseball team through 
what proved to be a very successful season, resulting 
as it did in another Conference Pennant for Illinois. 
The more one knows about baseball, the more one can 
appreciate the way that John played the game. He 
knew inside baseball and showed that he knew it at 
all times. Opposing teams were aware of his speed 
and hitting ability, as was evidenced by the fact that 
when he came to bat, the opposing infielders would play 
in close and the outfield would play back. He was al- 
ways taking his opponents unawares, however, and when 
the season closed he had many well placed hits marked 
up to his credit. 



HARRY FRANK COGDALL 

"Slip" will pilot the promising Illini Team for the 
1915 season. Illinois fans are sure the job is in safe 
hands, for there is 110 doubt about "Slip's" ability 
around the keystone sack. His diminuitive height com- 
bined with his characteristic patience makes him the 
hardest man to pitch to in the entire conference. In 
a practice game at Pontiac he made the unique record 
of working the pitcher for seven free passes out of 
seven times at bat. Although "Rabbit'' walks fre- 
quently, few pitchers deem it advisable to throw them 
in the groove. 



FRANK MILTON BANE 

One can not help but admire a fellow who can, in 
spite of a late start and a wearing season of basketball, 
take up baseball and go through the entire season with 
a batting average of .281 per cent and field around the 
first sack to the tune of 1000 per cent. Bane has every 
qualification of a first sacker and we have yet to find 
an infielder who can throw a ball either over or under 
him. Frank should prove a source of trouble for 
every pitcher in the Conference next season. 



IRA LEON RUSH 

Ira could not find his batting eye at the beginning 
of the season, but somehow while the team was down 
south he made a more thorough search, and when the 
boys came back he was already to accept a permanent 
berth at short-stop. His batting is far beyond the aver- 
age. He not only gets the wood behind the ball but also 
his entire weight which accounts for his wicked 
drives through the infield. Ira has another season 
before him and we are looking for him to repeal. 



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WALTER HENRY HALAS 

Mr. Huff recognized some possibilities in Walter as a 
pitcher soon after the indoor season had commenced, 
and started "Wee" McGill working with him. "Wee" 
succeeded in developing a pitcher of no mean ability 
out of "Hally". During the season he was called upon 
to bear the heavy work of the pitching staff, and he 
stood up well under the responsibility, pitching excep- 
tionally fine ball at all times. As a fitting climax to 
his eventful season, "Hally" had the honor of winning 
the deciding game of the year played at Chicago. 



PERRY HENRY GRAVES 

Perry rounded into form at a very critical time in 
the season,— just when the position at third base was left 
vacant because of Krebs' injury. He seemed primed 
for the occasion, however, and assumed the responsi- 
bility in a very creditable manner. In fielding he is as 
quick as a flash, and covers more than his allotted share 
of territory. His cleverness with the bat and his speed 
were a big factor in winning the deciding game with 
Chicago. If the season breaks a little sooner next 
spring, Perry should strike his stride several weeks 
earlier and prove to be of considerable service to the 
team. 



JOHN THOMAS BRADLEY 

Mr. Huff was exceedingly fortunate in being able 
to fill up the position left by Charley Fletcher's gradu- 
ation, with this star of near-Major League caliber. Jack 
stepped into the backstop position and handled it like 
a veteran. Illinois fans enjoy watching Bradley work 
behind the bat. Our pitchers have a world of con- 
fidence in him, and many an opposing base-runner has 
been surprised and paralysed by his unexpected and 
accurate pegs to the bases. 



i 







DOUGLAS McROBIE 

"Doug" is a catcher by trade and many of us thought 
that he and Bradley would work alternately behind the ^*^yfVr 
bat. This was not the case, however, for "G" soon saw 
that "Doug's" hitting made him too valuable a man to 
keep on the bench for even half of the time. "Mac" 
is a fighter from the start to the finish and possesses 
a brand of confidence which is badly needed in other 
departments of our team. He starts out with a deter- 
mination to win which lasts until the last ball is thrown. 
He is known among the boys as the founder of the 
"Up-and-at-'em" League. 




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LEON ARBUCKLE 

"Deak" is a natural born fielder. He covers acres of 
ground and is able to get the ball back to where it came 
from in the least possible time. When it comes to a 
pinch you will find that he is the one man who can be 
depended upon for the required hit. His hits although 
never very long, are hard and frequent. Right at the 
close of the season "Deak" suffered a slump in his 
batting, but now that its all over and we know that he 
has got it out of his system, we are expecting great 
things of him during the 1915 season. 



WODDWARD WILLIAM GUNKEL 

"Red" is a pitcher of the first water and those of us 
who saw him work in his freshman year were chuck 
full of expectations. For some unexplainable reason 
all pitchers have their off seasons, and it seems that 
"Red's" turn came last season. He delivers goods 
of a great variety, everything from an awful slow one 
to a wicked spit ball. Last season he was unable to 
keep them out of the groove, but this year when these 
assortments begin bending over the corners, Wood- 
ward's work ought to bear pretty close inspection. 



WILBUR KREBS 

After shifting him all over the infield, "G" finally 
decided that third base was the place for Krebs. In all 
of the other positions he fielded the ball too fast. 
Third base is the one place where a fielder does not 
have to wait very long for a ground ball, and here 
"Wib" proved a success for, as "Wee Willie" said, he 
"didn't have to hunt for the handle." His never failing 
"pepper" and constant noise always worked wonders for 
the team. This year Krebs ought to have a phenom- 
enal season. 



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Ralph L. Sanders 

Captain 
Eugene Schobinger 

Captain-Elect 
Sidney Casner 

Manager 

I I()MER DlCAKMAN 



Harry L. Gill 
(Coach) 



Manager-Elect 



Harry L. Gill 



Coach 



PERSONNEL 



Sanders 

Henderson 

Butt 

Colander 

Burke 

Schobinger 

Hohman 

McKeown 

Fish 

Goelitz 

Tapping 

Rapp 

POGUE 
SlEBENS 

Cooper 
Wray 




Homer W. Deakman 
(Manager) 



Ham mitt 

Belnap 

Stirton 

Mason 

Wright 

TlLTON 

Rue 
Currier 
Murray 
Hart 

M I NNIS 

Lansche 

CULP 

Husted 
Oswalt 
Polakow 



THE SEASON 

Purdue vs. Illinois, at Lafayette, Ind., May 2, 1914. 
Wisconsin vs. Illinois, at Madison, Wis., May 9, 1914. 
Conference Meet, at Chicago, 111., June 6, 1914. 
Northwestern vs. Illinois, at Evanston, 111., March 13, 191 5. 
Indoor Conference Meet, at Evanston, 111., March 20, 1915. 



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JUtoietor of % 1914 'STratk Reason 

It is very seldom that Coach John Moakley of Cornell University waxes 
enthusiastic, and rarer still that he indulges in words of praise, but in a letter to 
Coach Gill last year, Moakley cast aside his usual nonchalance momentarily and 
climbed to a dizzy height (for him) when he said, "You have a wonderful track 

team." 

The Illinois track team for 1914 was, indeed, a remarkable one. It was 
a superbly balanced outfit, yet it possessed its stars in nearly every event. 
Captain Sanders' men with equal ease mowed down its opponents in dual meets, 
relay carnivals, and Conference championships. During the course of the season 
eleven records were shattered, two equalled and one world's record tied. 

The preliminary tryouts for the team did not indicate that the Orange and Blue 
was to be represented by the strongest aggregation in its history. On the con- 
trary, it was thought that Illini prestige on the cinder path was due for a severe 
rebuff. Nevertheless, the rooters and members of the squad had explicit con- 
fidence in the ability of Coach Gill to handle the situation. As the season 
advanced, the team made steady improvement, ending finally on June 6 in the 
complete rout uf all adversaries in the Conference Meet. 

Before the opening of the regular indoor season. Coach Gill in response to an 
invitation from the First Regiment of Chicago to meet Notre Dame in a match 
one mile relay, selected Goelitz, Tapping, Henderson and Sanders to humble the 
redoubtable South Benders. This quartet proved equal to the occasion and 
succeeded in establishing a new Central A. A. U. record at the same time. 

Seeking new fields for conquest, Illinois made arrangements to bring Ohio 
State, recently initiated members of the "Big Nine" to Urbana for a dual meet. 
The victory over the Buckeyes was decisive, the score being 59 to 19. Then the 
reign of fire and pestilence began. A trip to St. Louis had to be cancelled when 
the headquarters of the Missouri Athletic Club was ruined by fire. The scarlet 
fever scare resulted in the calling off of meets carded with Purdue and Chicago. 
Despite this handicap of lack of competition, the "Indians" captured the Indoor 
Conference by a wide margin. The Illini contingent won first place in five out of 
the ten events, and in every event, one or more wearer of the Orange and Blue 
figured in the money. 

With indoor honors safely stowed away, the team entered the campaign for 
outdoor laurels with added zest. Early in April, Coach Gill conceived the idea 
of entering four relay teams in the Drake Carnival. Anything approaching 
this by one institution had never been attempted, in fact, most of the schools 
considered it a stupendous task to enter even two fairly creditable squads. At 
Drake, Illinois was to contest with a host of schools who would all practically 
concentrate their strength in one relay team. Notwithstanding this, Illinois 
accomplished, what in Gill's opinion was the greatest feat in its track history, by 
winning two of the events and finishing a close second in the other two. 

With these glorious victories as inspiration, the Illini crushed all opponents 
in their dual meets with telling effect. Purdue, Wisconsin, and Chicago all 
bowed before the tremendous strength of the Illinois cinder path giants. A 
remarkable feature of the Purdue contest was the placing of 27 Illini entrants 



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out of a total of 28 participants. The sport writer on the Chicago papers bemoaned 
the poverty of the English language in attempting to find adequate words to 
eulogize the triumph of Illinois in the Outdoor Conference. In a field of over 25 
institutions, Illinois succeeded in practically doubling the score of its closest rival. 

A review of the track season for 1914 would hardly be complete without 
mention of the wonderful work of Captain "Kink" Sanders and his remarkable 
team-mate "Alabam" Henderson. Although the acknowledged champion in his 
event. Sanders led his team without braggadocio, always being the first to make 
sacrifices when the welfare of the team could be advanced. During the progress 
of the season he broke the indoor record in the quarter and equalled the outdoor 
one. His victory over Haft at the Penn Games will live long in Illini track annals. 

But it remained for Henderson to create for himself the title of being the 
greatest Illini track star. His early development was slow, but he was determined 
to succeed, and he expressed this resolution by practicing with consistency and 
unswerving fidelity. In the Conference Meet last June, Henderson closed his 
career by capturing two events beside running on the winning relay team ; won the 
individual point prize ; and broke the only record of the meet and that was the 
wonderful Davenport's mark in the half mile. 

It was this spirit of determination and perseverance, coupled with a willingness 
to sacrifice everything for the welfare of the team as exemplified in the career 
of these sterling athletes, which makes Illini success in the track world possible. 

Sidney Casner, 

Manager 1914 




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EUGENE SCHOBINGER 

Captain Schobinger is unquestionably one of 
the greatest college all-around athletes in the 
country today. He can dash and hurdle, jump, 
Dr throw the weights with equal ease. At Illi- 
nois "Gene" has specialized in the pole vault and 
shot. Despite his massive bulk, Schobinger is 
the leading western pole vaulter. He is at his 
best when pushed, and as such ought to make an 
ideal leader for a team which hopes to win the 
Spalding trophy for three consecutive Conference 
championships. 

ANDREW BAKER HAMMITT 

"Andy" Hammitt, better known as the Des 
Moines Flyer, came unheralded, but quickly 
forced his way to recognition. In his sopho- 
more year he won fame as winner of the classic 
one hundred yard dash in the Conference meet. 
An injury received last season prevented him 
from duplicating his meritorious feats, but this 
year he is out to regain his former laurels. 



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CHARLES HAWLEY TAPPING 

"Hank" didn't think that he could run. No 
one else did either, in fact, they didn't think he 
had enough "get-up", but along came a little 
sunshine and the world was fooled. Consistent 
practice and hard work brought Tapping from 
obscurity to a crack athlete. With such a won- 
derful team-mate as "Alabam" Henderson, Tap- 
ping's star was somewhat eclipsed, but this 
season he intends to personally accomplish 
astronomical phenomena. 

LEON DEMING TILTON 

There are not many men who can stay out of 
the athletic game for a number of years, and 
then make a "come-back." Leon Tilton is 
among these select few. Besides, he tackled a 
new event, the low hurdles, and at the Confer- 
ence meet was able to rank among the leaders 
of the western college world by landing the 
bronze medal. 




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JOHN LATIMER McKEOWN 

"Laddy" McKeown is destined to become one 
of the most-talked-about athletes who ever wore 
an Orange and Blue track suit. For when ardent 
admirers of Coach Gill seek to drive home his 
efficacy, they point to McKeown as an tangible 
example. The art of high hurdling is perhaps 
the most difficult track event to master, yet Gill 
took "Laddy," who never before had leaped a 
high stick, and in one season developed him into 
the undisputed champion of the Middle West. 



GUY HAROLD HUSTED 

It isn't every man who can break an Illinois 
record in his initial debut as a varsity candidate, 
but the "Roodhouse Demon" was a wonder at 
hurling his avoirdupois into space for great 
distances. Handicapped by an injury to his hip, 
nevertheless Husted never faltered, and suc- 
ceeded in winning many points for his team, al- 
though every jump would cause him to twitch 
his face in pain. 



ELMER ALLEN CLAAR 

There are some who claim that "Willie" is 
eccentric, and in that list is Mr. Spee D. Spurt, 
but what normal man can high jump a height 
greater than his own ? Although not a star him- 
self, he has forced stars to make desperate efforts 
to take the first place ribbons from him. Despite 
his lightness, Claar has added many points in 
the discus. 



JULIAN LOUNSBURY FISH 

Practically on the eve of his 
entrance into varsity competi- 
tion, Julian was forced to leave 
the stage because of an attack of 
appendicitis. Since his re- 
entrance, Fish has been success- 
ful in winning a cherished letter, 
and is on the high road to a com- 
plete recovery of his old time 
speed and form. 







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WILLIAM HENRY GOELITZ 

"The man who performed the gamest feat 
known in Illini track annals". This is the label 
attached to "Bill" Goelitz after his remarkable 
performance at the Penn Relay Games last year, 
in which he ran almost a half mile on a cinder 
path with a gashed heel and with only one shoe, 
and thus made it possible for his team to win a 
championship of America. All of Goelitz's work 
is characterized by this same kind of grit and 
determination. 



JOHN HOLLY RAPP 

"If at first yon don't succeed, try, try, again." 
John H. Rapp illustrates this homely proverb 
beautifully. For two long years he plugged, per- 
sistently and doggedly, at first without any ap- 
parent success, but finally reaching that tantaliz- 
ing goal which embryonic half-milers hold most 
dear, namely, two laps in less than two minutes. 



NEWTON ANTHONY WRIGHT 

"Snooky" spent his freshman year at Illinois, 
made the yearling team and then went to Cali- 
fornia. After a year's absence, he returned, and 
it appears that the balmy western breezes pro- 
duced wonderful effects, for in the space of one 
year "Snooky" succeeded in breaking both the 
indoor and outdoor records in the one mile run. 
Wright is also proficient in cross country jaunt- 
ing. 



ORLIE RUE 

"The hard-luck athlete of the University." 
Orlie's athletic career has been sorely handi- 
capped by injuries and ailments. As a football 
player, injuries have kept him from shining as 
brightly as he should. He was a star broad 
jumper, yet a sprained thigh prevented him from 
even participating in that event. Rue's contri- 
bution to the track team was in the discus throw, 
in which he performed well. 



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ATHLETICS 

OUTDOOR RECORDS 

Event Holder Record 

ioo-yd. Dash May 109% 

220-yd. Dash Bell, Cortiss :2i% 

440-yd. Dash Cortiss, Sanders 49% 

Half Mile Run Henderson 1 :55% 

One Mile Run Wright 4:3° 

Two Mile Run Mason 9 4 1 % 

120-yd. High Hurdles Case :i5% 

220-yd. Low Hurdles Brown, Case =25% 

High Jump Clark 6 ft., % in. 

Broad* Jump Pogue 23 ft., 4 in. 

Pole Vault Murphy 12 ft., 6 in. 

Shot Put Burroughs 44 f t., 7% in. 

Hammer Throw Burroughs 152 ft., 9V2 in. 

Discus Brundage 129 ft. 

One Mile Relay — Cortiss, Sanders, Hunter, Henderson. 3:19% (World's record) 

INDOOR RECORDS 

35-yd. Dash May, Phelps :o4y 5 

40-yd. Hurdles Jenkins, Duprey, Case :o5% 

440-yd. Dash Sanders -5 2 % 

Half Mile Run Henderson 2:02 

One Mile Run Wright 4-37Y5 

Two Mile Run Mason 10:01 

Shot Put Burroughs 43 ft., 3 in. 

Pole Vault Murphy 12 ft., 3 in. 

High Jump Kirkpatrick 5 ft., 11 in. 

Relay (Burke, Stirton, Goelitz, Sanders) (One mile) 3:35% 



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TAPPING 



HENDERSON 



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The feats of Illinois' two mile relay team were hardly less remarkable than 
that of its famous predecessor— "The Immortal Quartet", Cortiss, Henderson, 
Hunter, Sanders. True, they did not break a world's record, but they did equal 
one, and spread afar the Illini fame by capturing the Western and National title 
in the two mile event. 

At the Drake Relay Carnival, the quartet handicapped by a slow, wet track ran 
in perfect form and tied the world's mark for the distance, travelling the two miles 
in 8:00. This splendid showing earned them the privilege of going to Pennsyl- 
vania. Mere they were to meet the fast Michigan learn which had never as yet 
tasted of defeat. 

The gameness with which the Illini fought their way to victory on that day will 
never be forgotten. I low "Bill" (ioelitz with one shoe torn from his foot by his 
opponents' spikes, resolutely stuck to the race, how Tapping pluckily took up 
the baton; how "Alabam" Henderson unyieldingly made up most of the lost 
distance; how "Kink" Sanders with an irresistible burst of speed at the finish 
brought the "Championship of America" to Illinois; these things will ever 
in Illini athletic history. 



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COACH GILL 

BURGOON 



WRIGHT 
GANTZ 



MANAGER DEAKMAN 

MASON BILLMAN 



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Although the 1914 cross country team was by far the best that was ever 
developed at Illinois, yet its achievements hardly measure up to that of the 1913 
aggregation. The answer to this apparent paradox is simple. While the Illini 
possessed sufficient talent to capture nine out of ten Conference Meets, in 1914 
Coach Gill's distance men ran into a tenth year, and were forced to bow down 
to the remarkable strength of Minnesota and Ames. 

Prospects for a winning aggregation looked bright when Illinois scored a 
complete slam in a dual meet with Indiana, but chilled perceptibly when it was 
learned that Minnesota had turned the same trick in faster time. In the Con- 
ference Meet at Lafayette on November 22, Illinois finished third in a field of 
ten teams — a very gratifying result ordinarily, but the championship bee was 
buzzing in the ears of the Illini and nothing but a crown would have been entirely 
satisfactory. 

As was expected, "Mike" Mason was the leading performer. In the Confer- 
ence run, he finished a close second to Watson of Minnesota, who established a 
new record for the five miles. Wright, Wray, Burgoon, Billman, and Minnis all 
showed improvement over their last year's form. Gantz, a Champaign product, 
altho a new-comer, shows promise of developing into a star. 



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ILLINOIS VS. PURDUE 
LaFayette, Indiana, May 2, 1914 



Event First 

100-yd. Dash Hohman, I. 

220-yd. Dash Stirton, I. 

440-yd. Dash Sanders, I. 

Half Mile Run Henderson, I. 

One Mile Run Wright, I. 

Two Mile Run Bolander, I. 

120-yd. High Hdls..McKeown, I. 
220-yd. Low Hdls... Bancker, P. 

Shot Put Currier, I. 

High Jump Polakow, I. 

Pole Vault Culp, I., 

and Phelps, P. 

Discus Throw Rue, I. 

Broad Jump Husted, I. 

Score — Illinois 95, Purdue 22. 



Second 




Third 


Time 


Hammitt, I. 




Murray, I. 


:io/ 5 


Burke, I. 




Applegate, P. 


■.23 


East, P. 




Hart, I. 


■■A9 3 A 


Tapping, I. 




Rapp, I. 


1 -S9 2 A 


Minnis, I. 




Schmedal, P. 


4:41^ 


Wray, I. 




Mason, I. 


10:14 


Bancker, P. 




Fish, I. 


:i6 


Fish, I. 




McKeown, I. 


:2S^5 


Schobinger, 


I., 


and Aldrich, P. 


38 ft., 4 in. 
5 ft-, 9 i" 


Claar, I., St; 


ihl, 


P., and Schobinger, 


1. 1 1 ft., 6 in 


Currier, I 




Aldrich, P. 


119 ft., 2 i 


Pogue, I. 




Tilton, I. 


22 ft. 



ILLINOIS VS. WISCONSIN 

Madison, Wisconsin, May 9, 1915 

Event First Second Third Time 

100-yd. Dash Hohman, I. Hammitt, I. Knudson, W. :io^ 

220-yd. Dash Knudson, W. Burke, I. Stirton, I. :22^ 

440-vd. Dash Henderson, I. Sanders, I. Williams, W. :SoH 

Half Mile Run Henderson, I. Tapping, I. Rapp. I. 1 :59^ 

One Mile Run Harney, W. Wright, I. Hedges, W. A-3A 2 /5 

Two Mile Run Mason, I. Perry, W. Blemish, W. 9:52 

120-yd. High Hdls.. McKeown, I. Fish, I. Chritzman, W. :i5^ 

220-yd. Low Hdls..Eish, I. Bassett, W. McKeown, I. :2S^ 

Shot Put Van Ghent, W. Keeler, W. Schobinger, I. 44 ft-, 8 in. 

High Jump Wahl, W. Claar, I., and 5 ft-, " in. 

Chritzman, W. n ft., 3 in. 

Pole Vault Culp, I. Oswalt, I., and 119 ft-, 6 in. 

Kerr, W. 

Discus Throw Van Ghent, W. Currier, I. Rue. I. 22 ft., 3 in. 

Broad Jump Pogue, I. Husted, I. Wahl, W. 125 ft., 4 m. 

Hammer Throw... Van Ghent, W. Siebens, I, Butler, W. 49 ft., l / 2 in. 
Score — Illinois 76^2, Wisconsin 49^2. 



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ILLINOIS VS. CHICAGO 
Illinois Field. May 15, 1914 

Event First Second Third Time 

ioo-vil. Dash Hohman, I. Barnacik, C. Ward, C. :io 

220-yd. Dash Barancik, C. Hohman, I. Knight, C. :22'A 

440 vd. Dash Sanders, I. Goelitz, I. Cornell, C. A9 3 A 

Half Mile Run....Henderson, I. Tapping, 1. Stageman, C. 1 :57 4 A 

One Mile Run Wright, 1. Campbell, C. Minms, I. 4:30 

Two Mile Run Mason, I. Stout, C. Bolander, I. 9:4i?5 

120-yd. High Hdls..Ward, C. McKeown, I. Fish, I. :I5 2 A 

220 vd. Low Hdls....Ward, C. Tilton, 1. McKeown, I. :26 

Shot Put Norgren, C. Schobinger, 1. Currier 40 ft. 

High Jump Gorgas, C. Whiting, C. Polokow, I., and 5 ft. 

Tenny, C, tied 

Pole Vault Thomas, C. Culp and Scho- 1 1 ft., 9 '«• 

binger tied 

Discu« Throw Des Jardien, C. Rue, I, Currier, I. 118 ft, 5 in. 

Broad Jump Pogue, I. Boyd, C. H listed, I. 23 ft, 2 in. 

Hammer Throw....Cooper, I. Lansche, I. Ball, C. 121 ft. 

Score— Illinois 70^, Chicago 55^2. 



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6 in. 
8 in. 




Wright Breaks Illinois Record in the Mile 



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A T II L E T I C ? 

Western ^Intercolleutate (SUmferente 
"Stark ^Meet 

Chicago, 111., June 6, 1914 

100 yard dash — Hohman, Illinois, first; Barancik, Chicago, second; Knight, Chi- 
cago, third; Bergman, Notre Dame, fourth. Time, :io. 

220 vard dash — Barancik, Chicago, first; Hohman, Illinois, second; Shearer, 
Drake, third ; Knight, Chicago, fourth. Time, :22. 

120 yard high hurdles — McKeown, Illinois, first; Norton, Stanford, second; 
Murray, Stanford, third; Bancker, Purdue, fourth. Time, :i5%. 

One Mile Run — Wilson, Stanford, first; Harvey, Wisconsin, second; Campbell, 
Chicago, third; Schmedel, Purdue, fourth. Time, 4:23%. 

440 yard dash — Henderson, Illinois, first; Sanders. Illinois, second; Cline, Colo- 
rado, third ; Stageman, Chicago, fourth. Time, :5c 

Half Mile Run — Henderson, Illinois, first; Osborne, Northwestern, second; Bon- 
nett, Stanford, third; Tapping, Illinois, fourth. Time, 1:55%. 

220 yard Low Hurdles — Murray, Stanford, first ; Ward, Chicago, second ; Lighter, 
Coe. third; Norton, Stanford, fourth. Time, 125. 

Two Mile Run — Mason, Illinois, first; Perry. Wisconsin, second; Moss, Missouri, 
third; Bemish, Wisconsin, fourth. Time, 9:50%. 

Shot Put — Bedeau, Stanford, first; Van Ghent, Wisconsin, second; Eichenlaub, 
Notre Dame, third ; Reber, Kansas, fourth. Distance, 44 feet, 4 inches. 

Discus throw — Bingham, Denver, first; Robertson, Minnesota, second; Des Jar- 
dien, Chicago, third; Van Ghent, Wisconsin, fourth. Distance. 129 feet, 
6 inches. 

High jump — Wahl, Wisconsin, first; Davis, Colorado, and Schroeder, Iowa, tied 
for second; Pittingcr, Ohio, Harvey, Oberlin, and Maurice, Northwestern, 
tied for fourth. Height, 6 feet, i 1 /? inches. 

Broad jump — Pogue, Illinois, first; Maker, California, second; Boyd. Chicago, 
third ; James, Northwestern, and Pittinger, Ohio, tied for fourth. Dis- 
tance, 22 feet, 8 inches. 

Hammer throw — Bingham. Denver, first; Coolidge, California, second; Berry, 
Lnke Forest, third; Butler, Wisconsin, fourth. Distance. 14-2 feet, 4 inches. 

Pole varl' — Schobinger, Illinois, Phelps, Purdue, and Keelcr, Ohio, tied for first; 
Oswalt. Illinois, Culp, Illinois, Krohm, Stanford, Kerr, Wisconsin, Hus- 
ton, Wisconsin, ddromas, Chicago, Reavis, Nebraska, and Lindstrom, 
Nebraska, tied for fourth. Height, 12 feet. 

One mile relay — Illinois (Burke, Hart, Henderson, Sanders), first; California, 
second; Wisconsin, third; Kansas, fourth. Time, 3:231/-,. 

Tota 1 points — Illinois, 45 7/12; Stanford, 2T,}i ; Chicago, 2034 ; Wisconsin, I9 T 4 ; 
Denver, 10; California, 6, etc. 

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ILLINOIS VS. NORTHWESTERN 
March 13, 1915, at Evanston 

50-yard dash— Hammitt, 111., first; Hohman, 111., and Bradley, N. W., tied for 

second. Time, 5 :\. 
60-yard high hurdles— Ames, 111., first; James, N. W., second ; no third. Time, 8. 
Shot put— Currier, 111., first; Schohinger, 111., second; Garida, 111., third. 

Distance, 40 feet, 2^ inches. 
Mile run— Osborne, N. W., first; Wright, 111., second; Gantz, 111., third. Time, 

4 :32%. 
High jump— M. James, N. W.. first; Parker, 111., and Claar, 111., tied for second. 

Height, 5 feet, 11 inches. 
Quarter mile run— Goelitz, 111., first; Hotchkin, N. W„ second ; Williams, N. W., 

third. Time, 53%. 
Pole vault— Schohinger, 111., and Culp, 111., tied for first; McFadden. N. W., 

third. Height, 1 1 feet, 6 inches. 
Half mile run— Tapping, 111., first; Rapp. 111., second; Palmer, 111., third. Time, 

2 :o6%. 
R e l ay _Hlinois, Tilton, Hart, Stirton, Goelitz. Time, 3:46. 
Two mile run— Mason. 111., first; Traxler, N. W., second; Burgoon, 111., third. 

Time, 9:54- 




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GLIMSTEDT (TRAINER) COMSTOCK APPLEGRAM BANE AI.WOOI) SQUIER COACH JONES 
RAY WOODS CRANE KIRCHER DUNER ( CAPT. ) WILLIFORD RALPH WOODS 

OTTO MCDERMOTT 



1914 ^Basketball 'Scam 



OFFICERS 

Ralph R. Rones Coach 

(). II. Glimstedt Trainer 

Sven Dunee '■ Captain 

PERSONNEL 

RALPH Woods Right Forward 

E. Allan Willifoed I -eft Forward 

Feank Bane : Center 

Sven Dunee Right ( mard 

Ray Woods Left Guard 

Clyde Alwood Left Forward 



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A T II L E T I C S 



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In 1912. Ralph Jones came to Illinois as basket 
ball coach. Close followers of the game have since 
that time watched the Illinois basket ball team rise 
from a state of mediocrity to that of the best team in 
the Conference. The rise of Illinois in basket ball 
*E- A has been phenomenal and the entire credit is given to 

our great "little" coach. Too much credit can not be 
given Jones for his work. As a fitting honor he has 
taken his seat in the Hall of Fame provided for all 
Illini coaches who have produced 1000% teams. 

The 1914-15 basket ball season was a great suc- 
cess. Jones' combination of speed and endurance, 
called by many "the fastest team in the country", was 
beyond all doubt the best ever developed at Illinois. 
^^^^^^^ At the beginning of the season two new faces appeared 
Ralph Jones, Coach in the line up. The team was intact from the pre- 

ceeding year, but the pace set by the sophomores was 
too fast for the veterans and the famous Woods twins fought their way to regular 
positions. 

Working s,moothly and confidently at all times the team swept all their 
opponents before them and came through the season with a 1000% record. 

Following is the schedule : 

Dec. 9 — Arkansas Aggies, at Urbana 6-52 

Dec. 12 — Illinois Wesleyan, at Urbana 9-50 

Dec. 18— Milliken, at Decatur 16-19 

Jan. 2 — Peoria Tigers, at Peoria i-k 2 7 

Jan. 1 1 — Indiana, at Urbana r 3 - 34 

Jan. 16 — Purdue, at Urbana 8-27 

Jan. 23 — Ohio State, at Urbana 17-24 

Jan. 26 — Indiana, at Pdoomington 4-20 

Feb. 8 — Wisconsin, at Urbana _ 19-39 

Feb. 13 — Wisconsin, at Madison 17-ig 

Feb. 15 — Minnesota, at Minneapolis 10-20 

Feb. 23 — Chicago, at Urbana 12-20 

Feb. 2y — Purdue, at La Fayette 15-22 

Mar. 1 — Ohio State, at Columbus 19-26 

Mar. 6 — Chicago, at Chicago 18-19 

Mar. 8— Minnesota, at Urbana 1 1-26 



fflmtfercnxc #tanMna, 



W. L. Pet. 
Illinois 12 o 1.000 



W. L 



Chicago 9 3 

Wisconsin 8 4 



Northwestern 



5 5 



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Minnesota 6 6 



•750 
.667 
.500 
.500 



Purdue 

Ohio .... 
Iowa .... 
Indiana 



3 9 

2 (^ 



Pet. 

•333 
.250 
,250 
.100 



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SVEN DUNER 

Captain Duner showed the right playing spirit for the 
leader of a strong, steady team. In his position at standing 
guard he was the backbone of the Illinois plays and the 
strength of the defense. He had a knack of getting his 
fingers on the ball, and used that ability to advantage in 
the team work. His dashes past the center down to the 
basket for a goal will long be remembered by the basket 
ball enthusiasts. Sven surprised his friends and teammates 
in his final year by becoming one of the most talkative men 
on the team, thus fulfilling Jones' prophecy that "if he can 
only get 'Noisey' to talk he will become one of the best 
players in the Conference". This was Duner's last year 
of varsity basket ball. The team will lose in him their 
strongest defensive man and most experienced player. 



I 



E. ALLAN WILLIFORD 

W'illiford. captain of last year's team, played at his old 
position of forward during his final season of college basket 
ball. His versatility on the floor and consistent, hard play- 
ing has brought the team through many difficult games. 
"Willie" was one of the strong units of snappy teamwork; 
around him was centered Coach Jones' complicated system 
of plays. He showed marked defensive ability, and could 
always be counted upon to get the ball at center. Handi- 
capped as he was by an injury during the first of the 
season, he came back and in the final games played the best 
basket ball of his career. 




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ATHLETICS 







FRANK BANE 

Frank Bane, the find of last year, was a big factor in the 
showing made by the team this year. Perhaps no player 
has been watched with so much interest by the fans in his 
development as the "Colonel". Two years under Coach 
Jones has increased his ability as a jumper and a good all 
around team man. Getting the ball in the region of the 
basket with room for one of his gigantic steps he is always 
good for a goal. Bane is the third member of the quintet 
who graduates this year ; he will leave a hard place to fill, 
not only on the team but also in the hearts of all Illinois 
rooters. 



RAY WOODS 

Of the freshmen varsity material who stepped into varsity 
togs this year. Ray Woods proved to be one of the most 
valuable additions to the team. Close guarding and speed 
won for him a position on the Illinois five. As a defensive 
man he was equally effective against both tall and short. 
Ray's eye for baskets during this last season was not so 
good as it was during his freshmen and high school days. 
However, some long shots of his at the end of the season 
gave promise of returning accuracy at hitting the basket. 




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RALPH WOODS 

Ralph Woods, a twin edition of his brother Ray, but some- 
what smaller and faster, has shown remarkable promise dur- 
ing his first year. His speed and "pep" started the games 
going with the first whistle. Ralph's size has counted 
against him as a defensive player, but his offensive ability 
and eye for the basket have made him one of the heaviest 
scorers on the team. He has proved to be one of the 
hardest men to guard in the Conference and shows promise 
of making a record in college which will equal his reputa- 
tion in prep school days. 



I 



CLYDE ALWOOD 

Clyde Alwood and Ralph Woods, slated for forwards, 
were a happy combination. All that Ralph lacked in size 
seemed to be added on to "Ham". Besides continuing to 
grow Alwood has played a good game of first year varsity 
basket ball. He is an accurate passer and a fast man on 
the floor. Like Bane, he is dangerous under the basket and 
has a good eye for the goal. With two years of college 
basket ball before him Alwood should develop into one of 
the strongest forwards in the West. 




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REIMERT 
LANSCHE 



HOLMBURGER 
THOMPSON MCDONALD MANLEY (COACH) FISHER 

GRIFFIN GREEN BEAUMONT ( CAPT.) CLEMENTS (CAPT.) MOIR 

Mtmwttg fern W&Ux |Mtf *<£mm 

PERSONNEL OF SWIMMING TEAM 

G. S. Beaumont, Captain Breast and Back Stroke 

J. M. Griffin, Captain-elect Speed and Distance 

C. E. Thompson Plunge 

A. P. McDonald, Jr Plunge 

R. Green Speed and Distance 

M. J. Holmburger Back Stroke 

E. J. Manley Coach 

PERSONNEL OF WATERPOLO TEAM 

O. R. Clements, Captain Right Guard 

O. A. Lansche, Captain-elect Goal 

R. E. Moir Right Forward 

M. J. Holmburger Center 

L. G. Krug Left Guard 

E. Fishek - Left Guard 



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ATHLETICS 




Coach Manley 



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Captain Reaumont 



The development of the swim- 
ming team during the season was 

wonderful. From losing dual 

meet contenders, Coach Manley 

developed his men so that they 

were warm contestants for the 

Conference Championship at 

Northwestern ; and not until the 

last event was swum off, was it 

discovered that Illinois had lost 

the championship to Northwest- 
ern by a single point. 

The brightest star on the team 

was A. P. McDonald, Jr., who 

had never plunged before he 

came to Illinois, but who succeed- 
ed in breaking the Conference record in his sophomore year, by clipping two seconds from 
the time of J. P. Lichter, a former Mini. It was necessary for Captain-elect Griffin to 
step into the position left vacant by the graduation of Vosburg, and he succeeded exceed- 
ingly well. He and Green did most of the sprinting and distance work. Captain Beaumont 
met very keen competition in his events — the breast and back strokes. The swimmers won 
the dual meet with Wisconsin and lost to the M. A. C. at St. Louis, to Northwestern, and 
to Chicago. 

In water polo the Coach and men were forced to learn the new game of Basket 
Water Polo, and to leave the old American game that was so popular with the spectators. 
The game was invented at Northwestern, so it is little wonder that North western finished 
in the lead. Captain-elect Lansche is expecting to lead his men to a Conference Champion- 
ship, and, with the good prospects in swimming to complete the Cycle of Mini Conference 
Championships. Captain Clements and Moir were the only two of the regulars of the polo 
team to graduate. With Fisher, Krug, Mooney, McCluggage and Lansche back, Coach 
Manley expects to build up a winning aggregation, and he will be aided by the addition of 
several men from last year's strong freshman varsity. 






O. R. Clements 



A. P. McDonald 



O. A. Lansche 



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WISCONSIN-ILLINOIS MEET 
Illinois Tank, January 8, 1914 
Event First Second Third Time 

Plunge ...McDonald, I. Thompson, I. Fehlandt, W. 70 ft. in 1 mm. 

50 yd swim.:.'.'.' Griffin, I. Steuer, W. Green, I *g sec 

00 dswim Griffin I. Steuer, W. Schiesswohl, I. imin.Sgsec. 

200-vd breast ...Taylor, W. Nickox, W. Chapman,. 2 mm., 53/ sec. 

i^vdback Taylor W. Greenwood, W. Chapman, I. 2 mm., 1 1/5 sec. 

'20-yd sw'mZZGreen, I. Ross, I. Steuer, W. 3 mm., 3* sec. 

Relay Race Illinois (Green, Ross, Schiesswohl, Griffin) 2 mm., 3 sec. 

Waterpolo (Forfeited by Wisconsin 2-0) 

NORTHWESTERN-ILLINOIS MEET 
Northwestern Tank, February 20, 1914 

Fvent First Second Third Time 

Plunge .McDonald, I. Thompson, I Grantham, N. 60 ft. in 27% sec. 

4 o-yd s' W 'im.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'...Woods, N. Nelson, N. Griffin, I . 22/ sec 

Too yd swim Woods N. Nelson, N. Griffin, I. 1 mm., 3^ sec. 

2^0-yd breast Scoles, N. Ennis, N. Beaumont, . 2 mm., 56-/5 sec. 

Z-yd back Scoles, N. Whitehead, N. Beaumont 1. 2 mm., 6/5 sec. 

220-yci: swim Woods, N. Green, I. S trader, N. 2 mm., 54/5 sec. 

Rela v Race Northwestern 

Wateroolo Northwestern 4-1 ,, , , „,, T - 

Illinois Waterpolo Team (Clements. Lansche, Fisher, Moir, Holmberger, Mooney, Krug, 

and Ross) 

CHICAGO-ILLINOIS MEET 
Chicago Tank, February 21, 1914 

F V e n t First Second Third Time 

Plunge ...McDonald, 1 Thompson, 1. RedmonC. 60 ft. in 29 sec. 

in Id swim"" Neff C Pavlicek, C. Griffin, I. 21/5 sec. 

t^ydTw m I.Neff C. Griffin, I. Pavlicek, C. 1 mm., 3 sec. 

S™L Goodman. C. Beaumont, I. Moir, I. 3 mm., ?H sec 

S-ydback Pavlicek, C. Shirley C. Be—, I. 2min 3 H sec 

220-yd.swim Nefif, C. Green, I. Koss, x min., 28/5 sec. 

WatL,!oh; e :::::nHuo;f .o-o (Team-Clements, Lansche, Moir, Krug, Holmberger, 
Fisher, Mooney, and Ross) 

M. A. C.-ILLINOIS MEET 
St. Louis Tank, January 17, 1914 .... . 

c • • -r A r ft Illinois o Waterpolo— M. A C. 9 Illinois 4 

Swimming — il. A. l_. o, Illinois o 1 

CONFERFNCE MEFT 
Plunge-McDonald, I, (1) ; Redmon, C. (2); Thompson, I, (3); Grantham, N. (4). 

Time— 60 ft. 233/5 sec. New record. 
40-yd. swim-Pavlicek, C. (1) ; Wood, N. (2); Nelson, N. (3); Griffin, I. (4). 

,00-yd. swim^Griffin! 6 !' (1) ; Strader, N. (2); Neff, C. (3); Pavlicek, C. (4). 

Time— 1 mill., 3/s sec. . . . 

200-yd. breast-Taylor, W. (l) ; Scoles, N. (2); Chapman, I. (3); Fnnis, N. (4). 

Time— 2 min., 47/ sec. , 

iSO-yd. back-Pavlicek, C. (1); Scoles, N. (2); Beaumont, I. (3); 1 aylor, W. (4). 

Time— 2 min., 2-/ sec. 
220-yd swim— Wood, N. (1) ; Green, I. (2) ; Neff, C. (3). 

Time— 2 min., 47ts sec. New Conference record. 
440-yd. swim-Griffin, 1. (1) ; Wood, N. (2) ; Neff, C. (3). rime-6 mm., 7 H sec. 
Relay Race-Northwestern (1); Illinois (2); Chicago (3). Jime-l mm -> *« sec - p . 
Waterpolo-Northwestern 0; tllinois 5. Team (Clements, Krug, Lansche, Fisher, Holm 

berger, Moir, and Mooney ). 

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In gymnastics for the year 1913-1914, Coach 
R. N. Fargo worked with a team composed of the 
following men: H. V. Orr, '14 (Capt. ); P. J. 
Sweeney, '15; R. M. Kamm, '16; E. G. Bucher, '15; 
P. J. Nilsen, '15; P. E. Buck, '14; H. L. Fisher, '14; 
N. F. Brunkow, '14. At the twelfth annual meeting 
of the Western Inter-Collegiate Gymnastic Associa- 
tion, held at Chicago on April 4, 1914, Illinois took 
third place with a score of 947.75 points. Wisconsin 
was second with an even 1000 points, while Chicago 
captured the Conference title with a score of 1 103.5 
points. At the close of the season P. J. Nilsen, '15, 
was elected captain, and the prospects are bright for 
a winning aggregation this year. 




FARGO (COACH) 

SWEENEY 



KAMM BRUNKOW BUCHER 

NILSEN ORR (CAPT.) FISHER 



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Walter Evans, Coach 



Coach Theodore Paulsen of the season 1913-1914 was not 
able to get much competition for his wrestlers. In their dual 
meet with Indiana, the Conference Champions, the Illini lost 
in all but one weight; J. R. Cummins having won the 175 
pound match. The team was composed of Glen Schroeder, 
'14, Capt. (135 pound class); John Cutler, '14 (145 pound 
class) ; and J. R. Cummins, '16 (175 pound class). 

At the Conference meet held at Chicago on April 4, 1914, 
J. R. Cummins gained a fall in four minutes in the final bout. 
He is the present holder of the Conference title in the 175 
pound class. H. D. Strong, '14, also deserves attention, but 
because of his light weight he was not allowed to compete in 
the Conference. 

Walter Evans, a professional wrestler, was hired to coach 
the Illini for the season 1914-1915. If good coaching will 
make a team, Illinois should return the victor at this year's 
Conference meet which is to be held at Lincoln, Nebraska, in 
April. Conference weights have been changed so that now 
they are 125, 13s, 145, 158, 175 pounds and heavy weight. This 
makes room for six men on the team and should encourage 
more men to come out for this sport. 

1914-1915 WRESTLING SQUAD 




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FRASER RUNNEBERG PUSEY 

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Review of 1913-1914 Season. 

In these war times, one 
turns to a more violent mode 
of self-defense than that given 
in his own hands. It may he 
of interest to the helligerently 
inclined to know that there is 
no better place in the West 
than Illinois to learn the art 
of fighting with the sharp and 
pointed instruments of war- 
fare. 

Coach Pengilly and Capt. 
Schurecht were able to de- 
velop one of the best teams 
Illinois has ever possessed. 
The team consisted of Capt. 
Schurecht, Griffin, and Van 
Natter. In their dual meets, 
the Illini were highly success- 
ful, defeating the Badgers at 
Madison and later the C. A. A. 
at Chicago. Their only dual 
meet loss was to the Maroons 
at Chicago. 

In the Conference meet 
held at Chicago on April 4, 1914, the Illini were able to come into their old form 
and to make a clean sweep of the Championships. Capt. Schurecht won both 
foil and dueling Championships and Griffin was judged first in the broad sword 
event. 

Although both Schurecht and Griffin graduated last June, the prospects for 
the present season are very favorable, and Capt.-elect Van Natter has great hopes 
of winning this year's Conference meet, which will be held at Lincoln, Nebraska, 
in April. 




TAYLOR 



1914-1915 Fencing Squad 
van natter, capt. cook 



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Personnel of Team 
S. T. Claflin, Captain 
A. S. Buhai, Captain- 
elect 
J. U. Salazar 
R. L. Moses 
Prof. W. A. Oldfather, 
Coach 

In tennis Illinois has 
won a place among the 
leading colleges of the 
middle west. Our double 
team, composed of Bu- 
hai and Moses, won 
their way into the finals 
at the Conference meet. 
They were defeated in a 
hard fought match for 
the championship by 
Squair and McNeal of 
Chicago. Captain Claf- 
lin was a veteran indeed, 
having been on the Var- 
sity team for four years. 
Although somewhat er- 
ratic at time, when he 
was "right" his game 
was practically unbeatable. Salazar, a Mexican, was a whirlwind performer whose only 
fault lay in a tendency to be a bit "wild" at the critical moments. Captain-elect Buhai and 
"Bob" Moses both played a hard, consistent game throughout the season, and their 
splendid teamwork made them a formidable combination in the doubles. As both these 
men will be with us again next year, prospects are very bright for a championship team. 




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LELAND STANFORD VS. ILLINOIS 
May 19, 1914, at Illinois 
Singles— Murray defeated Claflin, 6-4, 6-1. Hahn defeated Salazer, 6-0, 6-1. 
Doubles— Murray and Hahn defeated Claflin and Salazar, 7-5, 6-2, 6-1. 
Leland Stanford's team was especially strong, Murray being ranked fifth 
among the tennis players of America. 

MILLIKEN VS. ILLINOIS 
May 20, 1914. at Decatur 
Singles— Claflin defeated Long, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Salazar defeated Gill, 6-1, 6-1. 
Lusher defeated Moses, 4-6, 15-13, 6-3. Catlin defeated Buhai, 6-4, 2-6, 6-2. 

Doubles— Claflin and Salazar defeated Long and Catlin, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4. Second 
game called on account of darkness. 

THE CONFERENCE MEET 
May 27, 28, 29, 1914, at Madison 
Singles— Long of Milliken defeated Claflin. Thayer of Lake Forest defeated 

Sllrl7fir 

Doubles— In the semi-finals, Buhai and Moses defeated Thayer and Milroy of 
Lake Forest, 6-^5, 6-8, 6-4, 3-6, 6-4. Squair and McNeal of Chicago defeated 
Stellwagon and McGee of Minnesota, 6-1, 6-3. 6-1. In the finals, Chicago defeated 
us, 6-3, 6-3, 6-1. 

NORTHWESTERN VS. ILLINOIS 
October 23, 1914, at Northwestern 
Singles— James defeated Buhai, 6-3, 6-1. Rader defeated Moses. 9-7. 6-4. 
Doubles— James and James defeated Buhai and Moses, 6-4. 6-4. 

FALL TOURNAMENT OF 1914 
Fifty men entered the singles, while twenty teams competed in the doubles. 
Competition was exceptionally keen, and the singles only reached the semi-finals, 
which were won by Moses and Buhai over Colton and Hubble. The finals wdl 
be played in the spring. In the doubles Buhai and Moses defeated Rogers and 
Hubble for the championship, 6-3, 7-5, 6-4. 



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^Illinois (Solf ^ssadatimt 

Prof. G. A. Goodenough President 

Asst. Prof. A. C. Cole Secretary-Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE BOARD 
Asst. Dean A. R. Warnock 



F. H. White, '16 



C. P. Winters, '15 



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Golf is becoming one of the most popular 
sports at the University of Illinois. The 
membership, for which the fee is one dollar 
a semester, is larger than it has ever been 
before, with a total of one hundred twenty- 
one. At present the Association has a nine 
hole course on which "par" is 39 and 
"Bogy" is 41. The record for the course 
'is 35. Plans are being formed for the ex- 
tension of the links to an eighteen hole 
course and this will mean a moving of the 
location altogether as the Agricultural De- 
partment has the present links so surround- 
ed that they cannot be extended. The 
Association is identified with the Western 
Golf Association and also with the Inter- 
collegiate Golf Association which is cen- 
tered in the East. There is some hope of 
sending a team to the tournament of this 
Association to be held at Princeton this 
year. 

On Mar 7. 1914. a team composed of 

E. C. Proiity, '14; J. C. Whitelaw. '15, and 

F. H. White. '16, met Wisconsin in a dual 
meet at Madison. The Illini were returned 
victors by a score of 5 to 3. 

In the'anual fall tournament held in 1914, 
Howard Walton. '17. was the champion of 
the University, and J. M. Simpson. "17, was the runner up. The fall tournament 
is exclusively student competition as are also the intercollegiate matches. 

Negotiations are being made with Conference schools for dual meets and one 
will probably be scheduled with Chicago or Wisconsin. Although the team will 
feel the loss of E. C. Prouty, '14. former Cook County champion; with 11. R. 
Walton, "17; I. C. Whitelaw, '15; F. II. White, 'l6; C. P. Winters. '15, and R. 11. 
( )lsou, '15, eligible, the Illini expect to make a good showing against any opponents 
tlicv may have. 




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Ralph Jones, Coach 



Anderson 

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Clark 
Graham 
Halstrom 
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FLOCK COX HARDIMAN 

PETERSON KOPTIC LANG 



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Ralph Jones, Coach 



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PERSONNEL 






Harry Gill, Coach 




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SQU1ER POLK RALPH WOODS APPLEGRAM 



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Robert Zuppke, Coach 




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SEIGMUND VAN CLEAVE MANLEY (Coach) PURCELL KINER MC ELVEEN 

MC NULTA R. GROSS ROOS OTT HALL 



PERSONNEL 
E. J. Manley, Coach 



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PURCELL 
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Manager of Class Athletics 



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The system of class athletics was introduced in 
1912, for the purpose of stimulating class spirit and 
rivalry. The Athletic Association desires at all times 
to further the interest in class athletics and to reach 
those men who are unable to participate in Varsity 
competition, and to give to them the advantages of a 
large field of athletic competition which they otherwise 
would not obtain. In several cases it has been demon- 
strated that Varsity material is likely to exist in the 
various class teams — both Chapman and Pogue were 
found in this manner. 

Soccer Football was introduced to the members of 
the University, and at once leaped into such popularity 
that its continuance as a class sport is insured. 

With the added facilities in the new armory and on 
the south campus several other new sports will probably 
be introduced, thus giving everyone an opportunity 
to engage in some branch of athletics. 

G. E. McGaughey 

Mgr. Class Athletics 



CLASS BOARD OF ATHLETICS 




FAUROTE, 15 



RANNEY, 'l8 BROWN, \J 

MCGAUGHEY (Mgr.) GRIFFITH, l(> 



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The Class Football championship was ever in doubt until the Referee's whistle 
announced the victory of the Juniors over the Sophomores in the final game. The 
season was exceptional in the fact that never before have four teams so evenly 
matched battled for the Class Championship. Each of the four teams had men 
who were always dependable in advancing the ball and a bulwark of strength in 
all departments of the defensive game. The Juniors finished first, with the 
Sophomores as runners-up, while the Freshmen were a close third, placing the 
Seniors in the last position. However, this does not show the comparative 
strength of the four teams. The Illini Sporting Staff, after much deliberation 
picked the following men for the All Class teams : 

Merrill '17 

Bloch '17 

Mills '15 

T 1 1 Arc 1 1 i-:r ' 1 5 

\Y [LSI ) N ' 1 6 

ZlPF 'l6 

H usson ' 1 7 

MONNIG 'l8 

KiBnE '15 

1 [anger '17 

Miller '16 



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MILLER ZIPF ROGERS LITTLE (Capt.) KRITZER HAAN DON NELL 



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ETTINGER KASBEER (Mgr.) THOMAS "(Coach) ERICKSON 

FLOCK POLK SWICK WILSON HUSSON CAEGILL 

BLOCH DENNICK MERRILL HANGER (Capt.) SCHALLBERG ROSS OTT 




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BARBER 
FLEMING MOORE 



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CRAFT FOULKE WHITE 

GILL (Capt.) SPRAGUE COTTA 



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MARBACH WAGNER BRIGHT SHAW 



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CLARK BECKER (Mgr.) HAM II. I. 

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SCHNEIDER BURTON MUELLER (Mgr.) ERICKSON LAWRENCE 

WALSH KEESE AME.RUSTER RUEDI ROWE STEINHOFF 




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STOREY (Mgr.) TTLLSON BREW DEMPSEY ERW1N (Coach) 

WHITE KEEYS NICHOLS DEAN TRUSTER WALSH 



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MCEVOY HUTCHINSON HORTON SHEPPARD 

MYERS NELSON EOSTER 




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ARMSTRONG KROESCHELL ELWEIX EAGLETON 

FRANCES MC CARROLL ALT CAMPBELL 



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Bowling Trophy 



To the Pan-Hellenic Association credit must be given 
for the standard of excellence which inter-fraternity athletics 
have attained. Friendly rivalry has always been shown in 
these inter-fraternity contests, but never was it more 
plainly evidenced than during the past year. 

The Inter-Fraternity Bowling Tournament from every 
angle must be pronounced a success. So close were the 
matches that it was not until the last ball had crashed down 
the alley and the last pin slowly toppled over, that interest 
waned. Individual honors for 1913-1914 were to Don Gam- 
ble, who had the highest average for eighteen games. Close 
to his heels was Kenneth Buchanan, second by the fraction 
of a point. Fraternity division winners were Delta Kappa. 
Epsilon in the first division ; Theta Delta Chi in the second 
division ; and. Delta Tail Delta in the third division. The 
finals were rolled on April 21st. By scoring 2615, and 
incidentally establishing a new alley record, Theta Delta 
Chi was easily first. Delta Tau Delta was second with 
2402, and Delta Kappa Epsilon third with 2390. Richardson 
of Theta Delta Chi, with an average of 202 for the three 
games, was the star of the finals. 
Everything that has been said as to t]ie success of the bowling tournament can be applied 
in even a greater degree to the Inter-Fraternity Baseball League. Close and hard fought 
were the games, and even though the conditions under which they were played were not 
always favorable, excitement continually ran high. At the close of the season the following 
were the division winners: Alpha Delta Phi, Theta Delta Chi, and Phi Sigma Kappa. In 
the first game of the finals the Phi Sigs were defeated by the Alpha Delts, but in the 
deciding game between the Theta Delts and the Alpha Delts, eleven innings were played 

to a tie. Finally, as darkness was fast falling 
over Illinois Field, a coin was tossed to determine 
who should have possession of the first place cup. 
This the Alpha Delts 
won, and the second place 
cup thus fell to Theta 
Delta Chi. 

Above are shown the 
two baseball cups and the 
first place bowling cup. 

This year's B o w 1 i 11 g 
Tournament gives prom- 
ise of being equally ex- 
citing. As the Illio goes 
to press, the following 
fraternities are leading 
in their respective divi- 
sions : Delta Tau Delta 
in the first division, Sig- 
ma Alpha Epsilon in the 
second division, and Del- 
ta Kappa Epsilon in the 
third division. 








Baseball Trophy 
First Prize 



Baseball Trophy' 
Second Prize 



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The Physical Training Department offers opportunity for swimming, games of all 
sorts, gymnasium work, and gymnastic dancing. About three-fourths of the girls of the 
University enter into one form or another of the work offered. During the first semester 
of this year, eleven girls passed the test for swimming honors, sixty-five learned to swim, 
and 118 advanced swimmers were registered. 

In the fall, the object of the department is to teach each girl some game which she 
will play for the joy of the sport — something in which she can lose herself. About 170 
girls learned tennis last fall, the annual tournament being won by Maida Phoenix. 

Golf is another sport which outlives the four years of college life, and which young 
women may take with them as a splendid recreation for later life. Twenty-four girls 
learned the principles of the game this year, under rather adverse circumstances. It is 
hoped that a more adequate golf course may be available some time in the near future. 

Last fall, for the first time, two enthusiastic series of hockey games were played. The 
sophomores of Section C under the leadership of Gertrude Weber, won the section games. 
The bad weather prevented the completion of the class games in the fall, and these will 
probably be played off in the spring. The senior team stands first, with Nell Barnes as 
their captain. 

Basketball is always one of the most popular of our sports. Every girl who comes 
out is put on a team. The attention of the coaches is, therefore, not focused on a few of 
the best players. There were 89 girls in this year's series of games. 

In the gymnastic dancing the class is always crowded. There are 60 registered this 
year, while about four hundred are taking the regular gymnasium work. Of these, 260- 
are taking required work. 

This year the department has been greatly handicapped because of their small quar- 
ters, but are looking forward to the day when Illinois has a new gymnasium adequate to- 
meet the needs of all the women of the University. 

Gertrude E. Moulton 
Director of Physical Training for Women 



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Agnes Hitt, President 
Helen Fisher, Secretary 



OFFICERS 

Ruth Robbins, Vice-President 
Mabel Hitt, Treasurer 



Mae Babcock 
Laura Bardwell 
Emma Breitstadt 
Verna Brooks 
Verna Butzer 
Alice Dietzer 
Orena Farmer 
Helen Fisher 
Dora Frazee 
Rose Lee Gaut 
Grace Geyer 
Pauline LIalliwell 
Agnes Hitt 
Mabel Hitt 
Anna Hughitt 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Mable Jackson 
Maurine Marity 
Nannie Reeves 
Ruth Robbins 
Dorothy Shoemaker 
Irene Towson 
Irma Latzer 
May McAdams 
Jean McInnes 
Grace Mitchell 

( iERTRUDE MOULTON 

Rachel Myers 
Emma Pursley 
Anna Turlay 
( '.ertrude Weber 



Esther Ackerson 
Nelle Barnes 
Hazel Brunson 
Alice Harris 
Kate Lackey 
Ruth Fox 
Rachel Ruffner 
Gladys Moss 
Edna McKee 
Kathryn Norris 
Frances Marks 
Maude Marks 
Edith Osmond 



Bernice Wright 



WINNERS OF "I A", 1914 
Irma Latzer Ruby Moore 

Helen Mitchell Agnes Hitt 



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MONOHON BARBESBERGER ACKERT WRIGHT 

STREAT WISEGARNER FARMER CHRISTY GERLACH FLOCK MORTEN 

SMITH NOLAN SAMUELS GOODBRANDSON YALE CAMPBELL 

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NORRIS GREEN 

BOYD ROGERS 



RUFFNER HUDSON JOCKISH 

DALLENBACH SPENCER CHAIKENS 

ACKERSON HENN MARKS 



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ATHLETICS 



ALLISON GEHANT MUSSENDEN GEHANT BUTLER 

HITT CHEW DODDS THOMPSON 

WEBER FISHER LACKEY GEYER MARKS MC INNES 





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CHRISTY CRAIGMILE WILES 

GIEDBRUNSEN WARD JOHNSON 



SHAPLAND SWIFT 

WEBER DOYLE STATES 

BADGER GROSS BAMESBERGER 



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MARKS CHAKIN 

ROSMUND MURRAY 

BRUNSON ANDREWS DADANT 

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KIRK HULBERT 

NORRIS 

MIDPLETON 




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TURLAY HITT 



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In the spring of nineteen fourteen, 
forty girls registered as entering into 
the tennis tournament. The matches 
were all played in singles and at the be- 
ginning of the second round there were 
but twelve girls still in the field. After 
the fourth round there were three girls : 
Sophie Rogers, Bernice Wilson, and 
Maida Phoenix. In the final matches 
Miss Phoenix was victorious and so won 
the championship of the tournament. 



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Tennis Champion 



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Jfratcrnttics 



ORGAN IZATIONS 



Rational ^fraternities 



DATK OF 

NAME NATIONAL 

Acacia T 904 

Alpha Delta Phi 1832 

Alpha Tau Omega 1865 

Alpha Sigma Phi 1845 

lieta Theta Pi [8 39 

Chi Phi |S 54 

Chi Psi l8 4i 

Delta Kappa Epsilon 1844 

Delta Tau Delta 1859 

Delta Upsilon 1834 

Kappa Sigma '869 

Phi Delta Theta 1848 

Phi Gamma Delta 1848 

Phi Kappa 1886 

• Phi Kappa Psi 1852 

Phi Kappa Sigma 1850 

Phi Sigma Kappa 1873 

Psi Upsilon 1833 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 1856 

Sigma Chi 1855 

Sigma Nu ■■■■■ 1869 

Sigma Pi 1898 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 1899 

Theta Delta Chi 1848 

Zeta Beta Tau 1 898 

Zeta Psi 1847 



FOUNDING 


NUMBER OF 


NUMBER IN 


LOCAL 


LOCAL MEMBERS HOUSE 


1906 


24 


19 


1912 


26 


24 


l895 


29 


28 


1908 


3° 


29 


1902 


26 


29 


1912 


28 


24 


1912 


26 


20 


1904 


32 


32 


1872 


29 


28 


I9°5 


26 


24 


l88l 


27 


22 


1894 


25 


23 


1897 


29 


25 


1912 


21 


l8 


1904 


28 


19 


1892 


28 


2S 


19IO 


28 


24 


191O 


3° 


29 


1898 


31 


27 


l88l 


38 


30 


1902 


$ 


23 


1909 


28 


23 


1912 


29 


19 


1907 


26 


24 


1912 


17 


15 


1909 


2^ 


21 



3£otal Jfli-at entities 



Acanthus 

Chi Beta 

Chi Delta 
Delta Omega 

llus 

Iris 

Pi ( hnicron 
Psi Delta .... 



191 1 


27 




23 


1906 


27 




24 


1914 


27 




27 


T9II 


19 




K» 


1907 


23 




22 


1908 


28 




25 


[91 1 


2C 




20 


1912 


l6 




12 




( As at . 


June 30 


. 1914) 



318 




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ORGANIZATIONS 



|fcm H^lkntt (Kmntal 

Organized ipn 



FIRST SEMESTER 

N. B. Patten 

R. G. Perry 
J. M. Silkman 



Officers 

President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



SECOND SEMESTER 

A. B. Rayburn 

J. L. LONGUEVILLE 

H. S. Kirk 
W. L. Vansant 



Senior and Junior 
Delta Tau Delta 

D. E. Currier, '15 

D. M. McFall, '16 
Sigma Chi 

L. G. George, '15 

G. W. Renwick, '16 
Kappa Sigma 

J. C. Whitelaw, '15 

H. Mohlman, '16 
Phi Kappa Sigma 

W. H. Goelitz, '15 

N. D. Belnap, '16 
Phi Delta Theta 

R. D. Lanier, '15 

W. W. Hart, '16 
Alpha Tau Omega 

N. B. Patten, '15 

R. B. Bronson, '16 
Phi Gamma Delta 

A. B. Rayburn, '15 

W. M. Sutherland, 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

W. Crutchfield, '15 

J. T. Bbadley, '16 
Beta Theta Pi 

G. H. Butler, '15 

J. P. Crebs, '16 
Sigma Nit 

H. F. Ainsworth, 

M. E. Regan, '16 
Phi Kappa Psi 

J. L. LONGUEVILLE, 

R. C. Andrews, '16 



'16 



'15 



'15 



Representatives 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 

W. L. Vansant, '15 

D. L. C. McRobie, '16 
Delta Upsilon 

E. A. Williford, '15 
J. M. Wanzer, '16 

Theta Delta Chi 

W. C. Armstrong, '15 
W. L. Ash beck, '16 

Zeta Psi 

H. S. Kirk, '15 
E. H. Shelby, 'i6 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

H. A. Talbert, '15 

W. L. SCHLUETER, 'l6 

Psi Upsilon 

H. E. Weber, '15 

0. R. Zipf, '16 
Alpha Delta Phi 

C. C. Gamble, '15 

D. M. Glover, '16 
Chi Psi 

R. G. Perry, '15 
R. B. Zinser, j i6 
Chi Phi 

1. M. Silkman, '15 

E. S. Block, '16 
Alpha Sigma Phi 

R. P. Baker, '15 
A. C. Raithel, '16 
Acacia 

R. I. Shawl, '15 
E. F. Miller, '16 




319 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



Founded at Bethany College, 1839 



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Established 1872 



Alumni Chapters 35 



BETA UPSILON CHAPTER 

Colors — Purple, White and Gold 



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Resident Members 
William F. Burkes. M.D. Charles B. Taylor 

Bertram C. Nelson Royal A. Stipes 

Robert Y. Williams Judge C. C. Staley 

Louis M. Town Curtis C. Seymour 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Kendric Charles Babcock, Ph.D. 
Eugene Davenport, LL.D. 
Ira Osborn Baker, D.Eng. 
Edgar Jerome Townsend, Ph.D. 
Charles Henry Woolbert, A.M. 
Ralph E. Heilman, Ph.D. 



Phineas Lawrence Windsor, Ph.D. 
George Foss Schwartz, Mus.B. 
Francis Seely Foote, Jr., E.M. 
Frank Smith, A.M. 
Martin John Prucha, Ph.D. 
Robert Young Williams, E.M. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduates 

Charles C. Rees, B.S. 
Seniors 



Fred Albert Healy 
Kimball Valentine Root 
Donald Eugene Currier 

Frank Willard Ramey 
John Beitner Pagin 
Proctor George Kuhnen 



William Henry Simms, Jr. 
Ernest Howard Pool 
Charles Blake Cochran 



Juniors 



William Asher Mather 
Donald Romain Moffett 
Leon Mason Lindsey 
Ralph Egely Gifford 
George Wellington Stoddard 
Grandison Lloyd Griesei 



Dumas Miller McFall 
Leroy Oliver Grieser 
Edgar Dearborn Wallace 

Sophomores 

Walter Stephen Frazier 
Herman Robert Jobst 
Otis Rowe Manley 
George Wilson Merrill 
Frank Monteath Judson 
Leonard 1 Ioadley Davis 



Gordon B. Guilliams 
Arthur L. Gluek 
Carter P. Brown 
Karl A. Burnside 
Joseph W. Percival 

J. Quincy Kiler 



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Harlan Brown Graham 

Freshmen 

Richard Chamberlain 
Carlisle V. Allen 
Thomas J. Finnegan 
Harry A. Brannan 
Donald C. Dodds 



Pledge 



C. W. Johnson 



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CHAMBERLAIN GLUEK U.G.WILLIAMS BROWN FINNEGAN BRANAN ALLAN DODUS 

BURNSIDE G. L. GRIESF.R GIFFORD MERRILL GRAHAM JOBST FRAZIER PERC1VAL 

MATHER LINDSEY DAVIS WALLACE RAMEY STODDARD JUDSON MANLEY MOFFETT 

KUHNEN MCFALL L. O. GR1ESER CURRIER HEALY ROOT SIMMS COCHRAN POOL PAGIN 



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ORGANIZATIONS 

Founded at Miami University, 1S55 _ 

. . „, . A „ Alumni Chapters, 55 

A*™ Chapters, 67 KAppA KArl , A c , , A| , rK R 

,,.,,,, , r .00, Colors— Blue and bold 

< stablis ted Max V, J "° { 
Lstacnsne , y s RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Frederick Daniel Rugg Charles Morgan Coen 

Charles Albert Kiler Jay Corydon Iaylor 

Robert Davison Burnham Lawrence Arthur Glenn 

George McKinley Mattis Chester Richards 

Francis Thomas Carson Charles 1». Spencer 

Frederick Way Woody Walter Reach 

Thomas J. Colvin E. E. Lundgren 

Alfred M. Danely H. Balch 

Clyde Milton Mathews W. Mathews 

R. H. Shuett William I. Roysdon 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Charles Russ Richards, M.E. Harney S Ra,h ukke, MS. 

Tames Byrne Shaw, D.S. Robert \V. Hoffman, B.S 

David Hobart Carnahan, Ph.D. Edward Otto Reuse, Ph.D. 

Terrence O. Westhafer, A.B. 



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MEMBERS IN THE 
Seniors 



George Thallon Gill 
Henry White Ryther 
William Hornal 
Leslie Godfrey George 



Juniors 



William Heine Sellards 
Charles Francis Hough 
William Erastus Wheeler 
Nelson Lawnin 
John Ellsworth Covey 
Joseph J. Adams 

Robert Isaac 



UNIVERSITY 

Arthur Bowen Leavens 
Elon Gilbert Wilkinson 
Phillips F. Armour 
Arthur Allen Odell 

George W. Renwick 
Oscar James Murray 
Landon Baird Boyd 
Toseph Van Clief Gregory 
Frank H. Sterling 
Robert Bruce McFarland 
Terry 



Glenn Warren Robinson 
Allan Adams 
Charles Flannery 
Howard Walton 
David Burnham Starrett 



Sophomores 

Dudley Jones 

Richard' Forrester Duncan 
Leonard C Hoskins 
Eugene Wisehart 
Kenneth Miller 



Walter Stanley 



Freshmen 




Frank Godfrey 
James Monroe Sexauer 
Emil Wiley Hanley 
1 1 \ hold Boeschenstein 
Tom Leeming 



Robert Denkmann Marshall 
Eugene Underwood 
George Eugene Scott 
Willard Se \ roN K ujfman 
Tames Xenophon King 




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MARSHALL KAUFMAN UNDERWOOD GODFREY KING LEEMING BOESCHENSTEIN HANLEY SEXAUER 

WISEHART HOSKINS STANLEY WALTON MILLER JONES DUNCAN FLANNERY ROBINSON SCOTT 

COVEY TERRY BOYD MURRAY STARRETT J.ADAMS MC FARLAND RENWICK LAWNIN GREGORY STERLING 

LEAVENS ODELL HORNAL GILL SELLARDS GEORGE HOUGH WILKINSON WHEELER ARMOUR 



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Active Chapters 80 



sounded at Virginia University, 1867 ^^ ^^ ^ 



ALPHA GAMMA CHAPTER 
PP PmoRS— Scarlet White, and Emerald Cieen 

Established May J/, 1881 



Fay Morrissey 
Walter Stern 
Newton M. Harris 
Bert E. Spalding 
William H. Monier 
Paul J. Dan ley 
George A. Huff 
Thomas E. Saunders 
Albert Stern 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Walter B. Riley 
George C. Fairclo 
John H. Trevett 
Russell A. Spalding 
Seeley C. Gulick 
Simon H. Freeman 
Dan Morrissey, Jr. 
J. Woodman Harris 
Floyd W. Moiilman 
W. E. C. Clifford 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
. „ „ Earle S. Alden, M.A. 

George A. Huff w _ Bailey> m s . 

Floyd Mohlman, M.S. Charles E Bradbury, B.P. 

Herbert F. Moore, M.E. Charles r.. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
T Umes Cameron Wiiitelaw 

PAUL ERASTUS J°N- rbert Augustus jUnMEYER 



Juniors 



Harry Mohlman 
Vernon Wesley Carr 



Ralph Arthur Swanson 
Charles James Saul 



Amos Lloyd Breneman 



William C. Pratt 
Edward M. Stephenson 
Charles B. Rowe 
Harold V. Newlin 
Clinton A. Pierce 



Sophomores 

Robert A. Burton, Jr. 
Gforge H. Hoffman 
Lyle H. Gift 
Ralph T. Newlin 
Lewis A. Moore 



Herbert C. Tiffany 




Luke C. Ray 
Joseph T. Monnig 
Clarence L. Doerr 
Norman R. Booth 
Casper W. Sandehn 



Freshmen 

Allen G. Butler 
Kenneth G. Cooling 
N. Grant Strathern 
T. James McCown 
Charles H. Houi.t 
Ai.lvn B. Mathews 




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ORGANIZATIONS 



Pappa #t0nra 



^■p 




M,;« 



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MOORE BOOTH MATTHEWS RAY DOERR BUTLER 

MONNIG SANDEHN MC COWN STRATHERN COOLING HOULT 

PIERCE ROWE GIFT PRATT STEPHENSON SAUL H NEWLIN 

R. NEWLIN BRENEMAN SWANSON JONES WHITELAW MOHLMAN CARR BURTON 




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pjt l^appa i%tna 



Established 1892 

F. S. Boggs 

G. G. Goll 



Founded at Pennsylvania University, 1850 
RHO CHAPTER 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

A. E. Huckins 
L. C. Bernard 



Active Chapters 27 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
A. R. Cratiiorne, Ph.D., B.S. J. W. Davis , M.E. 

W. D. Foster, M.S. A. C. Willard B S 

L. A. Harding, B.S., M.E. L. V. Burton, B.S., M.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
L. V. Burton 



Seniors 



Edward Woodin Creighton 
Charles Wheeler Shook 
Melville Alyea 



Allen Douglas Don n ell 
Ralph Von Valtier 
Roy Lee Peck 
Willis Francis Slayton 



Hawley Lester Smith 
Wallis Johnson Evans 
Carl Eugene Johnsen 



William Henry Goelitz 
James Howard Griftner 
James Burr Hickman 



Juniors 

Null Dinsmore Belnap 
Bruce Nutter Culmer 
Erwin Fisher 
Lewis Throckmorton Gregory 

Sophomores 

Edward Herschel King 
John Lester Devlin 
Marshall Eugene Kobe 



Bennie Hebron Lucy 
Ralph Cottingham Paddock 
Le Roy John Westenhaver 
Newman Romero 
Harold Alvah Drew 



Pledges 



Arthur ALOYSIUS Daii.ev 
Warren Michel Sawtell 
Porter Ciiari.es Noble 
Forrest Livingston Haines 
( Ieorge John Brew 



326 




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O R G A N I Z A T I () N S 






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DAILEY SAWTELL NOBLE 



LUCY WESTENHAVER ROMERO 

DREW EVANS BURTON JOHNSON SMITH DEVLIN KING " ~PAD~DOCK 

SLAYTON FISHER DON NELL BELNAP CULMER VON VALTIER KOBE 

AIM A CREIGHTON GREGORY PECK SHOOK GRIFTNER HI 



UCKMAN GOELITZ 



327 



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tnois *-■ .————. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

pji P«Ita Uljcta 

Founded at Miami University, Dec. 26, 1848 

Active Chapters 80 
Established Feb. 19, ^93 . Colors— Argent and \zure 

Flower — White Carnation 

ILLINOIS ETA CHAPTER 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Fvarts Boutell Greene, Ph.D. 
Neil Conwell Brooks, Ph.D. 
William Chandler Bagley, Ph.D. 
William Abbott Oldfather, Ph.D. 
Joel Stebbins, Ph.D. 
Warren Albert Ruth, A.M. 
Harry Gardner, M.S. 
Justa Morris Lindgren, A.M. 
Frank Walbridge DeWolf, B.S. 
Harrison Edward Cunningham, B.S. 
George Phillips Little, Jr., B.S. 
Charles Hughes Johnson, Ph.D. 
William Walter Cort 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



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Seniors 



Earle Steele MacPherson 



Russell D'Lyon Lanier 
Rex Carr Eaton 
Wilbur Meek 
William Ward Hart 
Frederick Leon Mills 



Harry Darby, Jr. 
Emory George Hall 
Raymond Lorimer Grantz 
Walter McKinley Carter 
James Bernard Carroll 



Rea Lincoln Eaton 
Marion Murphy Hart 
Walter Kilborn Frost 
Merton Tanner Straight 
Niles Easton Mills 



■rtata 



Ralph Green 

Juniors 

Maurice Loyd Thomas 
Ralph Raymond Thomas 
Harry Havens Almond 
William Kinney Crawford 
Albert Gustav Degen 

Sophomores 

George Thomas Parker 
James Craig Van Meter 
Henry Scovell Beardsley 
Samuel McNabb Pollock 
Stephen Meserve Birch 



Freshmen 



Walter Fred Tiieis 
LeRoy Parker Branch 
Charles Lathrop Bingham 
Leonard Elmer Andrews 
Max Frederick Miller 



328 



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S Illinois % 

ORGANIZATIONS 




f lit P*Ifa ^Ifcta 




M. HART BINGHAM BRANCH THEIS FROST ANDREWS 

CARTER BEARDSLEY VAN METER STRAIGHT CARROLL PARKER MILLER R. EATON 

HALL MEEK W. HART M. THOMAS R. THOMAS POLLOCK GRANTZ DARBY ALMOND 

DEGEN MILLS POPE MAC PHERSON LANIER GREEN R.C.EATON CRAWFORD 



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R G A N I Z A T IONS 



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Founded at Virginia Military Institute, 1863 

Active Chapters 64 
ILLINOIS GAMMA ZETA CHAPTER 

Established at Illinois May, 1895 Colors—Sky Blue and Gold 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



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Clarence Johnson 
Eugene Burke 
ashton campbell 



Louis Blum King 
Edwin Flanigan 
Horace Smith Wilson 
Albert Mulliken 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



William F. M. Goss, D.Eng. 
David F. McFarland, Ph.D. 
Henry Lewis Rietz, Ph.D. 
B. Smith Hopkins, Ph.D. 
Paul William Allen, M.S. 



Nathan Austin Weston, Ph.D. 
Franklin William Scott, Ph.D. 
Thomas Arkle Clark, A.B. 
Ernest James Reese, Ph.D. 
Percy Ash 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
Albert Merrill Allyn Robert Ellsworth Thomas 

Norman Bond Patten, Jr. John Percival Beall 

Chester Abram Hemphill Howard Horace Phelps 

George Washington Blake 



Roger Beckwith Bronson 
Harold Austin Pogue 
Louis Gustave Krug 



John Howard Powers 
Thomas Samuel Brown ing 
Scott McNulta 



Juniors 

George Waldo Ball 
Roger Edward Hill 
George Kasson Squier 

Sophomores 

I Iarold Ames Clark 
Marion McDonald Lovell 
Paul McCauley Boston 



Freshmen 



Paul Samuel Wallace 
Austin Newton Reece 
Donald Samuel Atkinson 
Eugene Hamilton Russell 
Scott Mtlholland Julian 
Casper Tyrrell Garth 



Russell Sherman White 
Cyril James Goodman 
Moffet Barrows Allen 
Roy Sittig Kroeschell 
Francis Marion Wright 
Thomas James Warren 



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ALLEN REECE WHITE WALLACE WRIGHT 

GARTH KROESCHELL JULIAN WARREN BROWNING BOSTON RUSSELL ATKINSON 

MC NULTA CLARK HILL BRONSON SOUIER KRUG POGUE LOVELL POWERS 

PATTON BEALL ALLYN THOMAS BLAKE PHELPS HEMPHILL BALL 



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Founded at Jefferson College, 1848 
Active Chapters 59 Alumni Chapters 32 

CHI IOTA CHAPTER 



Established October, 1897 

Lloyd C. Douglas 
James C. Thorpe 
William G. Palmer 



Color — Purple 



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RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Charles R. Adams 
John W. Wetmore 
Friedel C. Richly 



MEMBERS 
David Kinley, Ph.D. 
Arthur H. Daniels, Ph.D. 
James M. White, B.S. 
Charles M. Poor, Ph.D. 
John Detlefson, Ph.D. 
Stephen A. Forbes, Ph.D. 
Lotus D. Coffman, Ph.D. 
Frederic Dun calf, Ph.D. 
Harvey W. Miller, M.E. 



IN THE FACULTY 

George A. Goodenough, M.E. 
Walter A. Buchen, A.B. 
Clarence E. Noerenberg, A.E. 
Joseph M. Kellogg, M.Arch. 
Fred B. Seeley, B.S. 
Robert K. Steward, B.S. 
Elmer A. Holbrook, B.S. 
Harry M. Weeters 
John L. Erb, F.A.G.O. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Post Graduate 
Stewart Dent Marquis 



Seniors 



Will Walter Mounts 
Bradley Cleaver Lawton 
Alexander Wagner 
Guy Columbus Faurote 
Allan Barnes Rayburn 

Russell Smith Colton 
Burton Tuttle Curtis 
Wilbur Mills Sutherland 



Juniors 



John Joseph Pitts, Jr. 
Seldon Lewis Stebbins 
Harry Farrar Knappenberger 
Thomas David Randall 
Julian Lounsbury Fish 

Richard Walker Kritzer 
Fenton Hamilton Williams 
Charles Reeves Little 



Albert William Robinson 

Sophomores 
Fritz Harris Fisk John Harold Kasbeer 

Edwin Thome Colton Harry Curtis Smith 

Charles Venable Robertson Maris Herford Vernon 

Allen Brookins Brown 



Robert Dale Robertson 
Harry Wilson Gibson, Jr. 
Alvin Carl Bromm 
Phillip Marion Spink 



Pledges 



Edward Arthur Harrison 
Robert Edward Abbott 
William Gordon Read 
Duncan Oliphant Welty 



Ira Edward Gillen 



332 



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CURTIS FISK VERNON E. T. COLTON C.V.ROBERTSON BROWN 

KASBEER WILLIAMS ROBINSON LITTLE NOERENBERG KRITZER, SUTHERLAND SMITH R. S. COLTON 

MARQUIS RANDALL PITTS FAUROTE LAWTON MOUNTS WAGNER KNAPPENBERGER FISH STEBBINS 



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Founded at the University of Alabama, 1836 
Active Chapters 80 Alumni Chapters 40 

ILLINOIS BETA CHAPTER 
Established at Illinois, January 28, 1899 Colors— Purple and Gold 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Cyrus F. Newcomb 
James Wesley Huss 
Arthur N. Bennett 
Robert Guy Van Doren 



Ralph Leverett Kelley 
Roy Men ely Ross 
Glenn Thompson Ross 
Robert Hyndman 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Oscar A. Leutweiler, M.E. 
Charles M. McConn, A.M. 
Harold Ordway Rugg, C.E. 
Walter C. Coffey, M.S. 

Frederick Noble Evans. A.B., M.L.A 



Edward Harris Decker, LL.B. 
Elmore Peterson. A.B., B.Com. 
Edward Arthur Reese, A.M. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Seniors 



Holland Robert Bacher 
Willliam Crutch field 

Charles William McCumber 
Owen McIntosh Burns 
John Thomas Bradley, Jr. 
Lloyd Daniel Bunting 
Harold Edward Clark 
Henry Clay Coleman, Jr. 



Curtis Redney Light 
George Albert Geib 



Juniors 



James Harmon Gilbert 
Don Charles Johns 
M. Wayne Johnson 
Robert Eugene Johnson 
Louis Frederick Jungkunz 
Roy Walter Leibsle 



Henry Ray Cox 
E. Burt Cooley 
Eugene M. Frederick 



El ie Spencer Kriegh 

Sophomores 

Clyde Harold Burgston 
J. G. Estill Kipp 
Woodruff L. Crawford 



Freshmen 



Paul Moll 

Clarence Scott Gill 

Elmer Bauer 

Francis Putman Knight 



William O'Connell 



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Francis Edward Richardson 
Gaylord Stillman Davidson 
J. Irving Rinakee 
John C. Neely 



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W.JOHNSON COOLLEY KIPP FREDERICK CRAWFORD BAUER KNIGHT GILL 

BURGSTON GILBERT BURNS O'CONNELL CLARK COLEMAN BRADLEY COX JOHNS 

R. JOHNSON BUNTING MC CUMBER LEIBSLE CRUTCHFIELD JUNGKTJNZ BACHER LIGHT GEIB KRIEGH 



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Founded at Miami University, 1839 
Active Chapters 78 Alumni Chapters 113 

SIGMA RHO CHAPTER 

Established February 28, 1902 Colors— Pink and Blue 

Flower — Rose 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Raymond S. Blatciiley Frank B. Heibert 

Martin S. Bryant Wesley W. Hanford 

George E. Carothers Clarence J. Parks 

Albert Eisner, Jr. Edward G. Schaumberg 

Edward Eisner Benjamin Pierce 

Robert Eisner George Midciff 

John Simpson 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Mervin James Curl, A.M. James Manley Phelps, A.B. 

George Henry Meyer, A.M. Joel Andrew Sperry, A.B. 

Earl Horace Warner, B.S. Arthur Ray Warnock, A.B. 

William Shirley Bayley, A.B., Ph.D. 

Thomas E. Savage, A.B., B.S., Ph.D. 

George McPhail Smith, B.S., Ph.D. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
Harry Barrett Rogers Walter Lester Nichols 

John Low Gardiner Leon Deming Tilton 

George Howland Butler Donald Bert Rich 

Ralph Linden Barlow Orlie Rue 

Juniors 
Kenneth George Brown John Powell Crebs 

J. Russell Jones Gardner Spencer Rogers 

Howard Dawson Murphy 

Sophomores 

Tom Brown William Oscar Nelson 

Will Edward Niven James Hotchkiss Ticknor 

Kaywin Kennedy John Findley Taggart 

John Christian Knociie Alfred Eidmann Kern 

Freshmen 
Erwin Risely Brigham Reynold R. Kraft 

Charles C. Brooks Chester Kreidi.er 

W. Carter Butler Stanley Pettes 

Philip Butler Edwin John Philips 

Marion IIari.and Wardell Wilkinson 

-J 336 

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ORGANIZATIONS 




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NELSON KREIDLEB BRIGHAM HARLANU KENNEDY K.BROWN 

KERN WILKINSON NEVIN P.BUTLER BROOKS KRAFT T.BROWN TICKNOR 

G.ROGERS TAGGERT JONES KNOCHE CREBS W.C.BUTLER PETTER PHILLIPS MURPHY 

H.B.ROGERS RUE BARLOW G.H.BUTLER GARDINER NICHOLS K1CH TILTON 



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Founded at Virginia Military Institute, i860 

. . „, . AQ Alumni Chapters 40 

Active Chapters 00 

GAMMA MU CHAPTER 
Established May so, i 9 oi Coums-Black, White and Gold 



1 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Maurice L. Hecker 
Rollin C. Gere 



Orlando S. Murray 
Arthur D. Savage 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



George W. Pickles, Jr., B.C.E. 
Fred Hall Kay, B.S. 



F A. Russell, A.B., A.M. 

J. Earll Miller, A.B., A.M., LL.B. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduates 
Ouincy Wright, A.M., A.M. Robert Hendle, B.S. 

Gordon Watkins, A.B. Walter Gatward, B.S. 



Seniors 



Macdonald Charles Booze 
Turril Dean Shonts 
Joseph Nathaniel Greene 
Gold Samuel Hopkins 



Frank Hilton Thorne 
Harry Francis Ainsworth 
Helmuth Julius Kircher 
Roy Allen Goff, A.B. 



Herbert Earl Hart 
Juniors 



Maurice Edwin Reagan 
Glenn Hollis Eggert 
Lester George Ayers 
George Bernard Marx 



Eric Frederic Piiilgard 
Arthur George Seifried 
D^rbin Downey 
F. Y. Olbrich 



William R. Harris, A.B. 

Sophomores 

Robert Hatch Humphreys Preston Brown Calhoun 

Humphreys Oliver Siegrund Roland George Roberts 

Harry Wilson Lange 



Francis Skiff Jannotta 
Edward P. Stauder 
Lowell C. Houghton 
Charles Allan Pavey 
Glenn Evans Hudson 
Ralph Spears Reding 



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Pledges 



Charles Foskey Spangler 
Raymond S. List 
Roland Adhemar Cow ell 
Thomas Robert Gibson 
James Raymond Gibson 
Alexander McJunkin Tower 



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COWELL LIST HUDSON JANNOTTA STAUDER 

HUMPHREYS SPANGLER TOWER T. GIBSON HOUGHTON CALHOUN REDING PAVEY 
ROBERTS HART PIHLGARD SEIFRIED MARX DOWNEY AYRES LINGE J.GIBSON 
EGGERT HOPKINS BOOZE SHONTS GREENE AINSWORTH KIRCHER THORNE REAGAN 




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Founded at Washington and Jefferson College, 185. 
Active Chapters 46 



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Established njof 



ILLINOIS DELTA CHAPTER 

Colors — Lavender and Link 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Daniel Gardner Swannell 
James Malcolm Kkiilok 
( rUYON C Whitley 
Willard O. Wilson 



Henry Woodside Berks 

Rowland William Ruth 
Charles F. Mansfield, Jr. 
Warren I. Ili.uk 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Hon. E. I. Iames, A.M., Ph.D., LL.D. Austin A. Harding, B.S. 
Madison I. Bentley, Ph.D. Lockwood J. Towne, Ph.B., B.S. 

Ralph M. LIilscher, B.S. Frank Lincoln Stevens, M.S., Ph.D. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
Wallace Wvman George Kerns Richmond 

Webb Mellin Siemens Ralph Chapman 

Harry Frank Cogdall Lloyd Warfield Brown 

Joseph Charles Longueville 

Juniors 

Wendell Kemp McCracken Harry Thomas Rogers 

Roscoe Crum Andrews John Lamphier Chatterton 

Waido Ray Myers Chester Junius Cadle 



Donald Allen Fay 
( iEORCE James Pace 
Bruce Van Cleave 
Randall Bear 



Sophomores 

Walter Alexander Laing 
Franklin Bartlett Macomber 
Noel Paul Whitehead 
Verne Healy 
Philip Harry Potter 



James Hamilton Black 
Wallace Van Cleave 
John Charles Craft 
Donai i) Job nson 
Theodore 1 1 chert Lethen 
Roy Edward Ruehl 



Pledges 



George Norman Brinkerhoff 
Arthur Franz Sweeney 
Charles Patrick Anderson 
Joe Woodyard Varner 
Robert Eugene Andrews 
Philip Corper 



Walter Bosworth 



340 




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R. E. ANDREWS RL'EHL W. VAN CLEAVE CRAFT SWEENEY VARNER JOHNSTON 
EOSWORTH CORPER BRINKERHOFF PAGE POTTER HEALY BLACK LETHEN 

LAING B. VAN CLEAVE FAY CHATTERTON CADLE ROGERS WHITEHEAD MACOMBER BEAR 
MYERS MCCRACKEN WYMAN SIEMANS BROWN COGDALL CHAPMAN LONGUEVILLE RICHMOND 

R. C. ANDREWS 



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Active Chapters 43 



founded at Yale University, 1844 



Alumni Associations 36 



DELTA PI CHAPTER 
Established at Illinois, IQ04 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Edmund Charles Barto, B.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Maurice Henry Robinson, Ph.D. 
Morgan Brooks, M.E. 
Daniel Otis Barto, B.S. 



Alfred Joseph Gunderson, B.S. 
Charles" Alton Ellis, A.B. 
Julian Montgomery, C.E. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Seniors 



Kenneth Lupton Cooper 
Fred Sheaff Wells 
Marshall Simeon Dutton 

Douglas McRobie 
Walter Hubert Beal 
Richard Fyfe Barnum 
Woodward William Gunkel 



Juniors 



Eugene Schobinger 
John Mitchell Griffin 
William Laurence Vansant 

John Elder Pyron 
Wyatt Goan Emmond 
Rodman Fleming Vansant 
Alexander Paul Macdonald 



Sophomores 
Monroe Heath Allen Richard Omeara 

i 1 hrkert Buell Dutton George Sanborn Smith 

Frank Howard Pethybridge Raymond Edward Meyer 

William Chauncey Savage John Eugene Day.s 

Freshmen 
Dougai l Anthony Kittermaster Edson Lowell Nott 

Myron John Doran Marshall Campbell 

George Edward Salladin, Jr. David Coxe Webster 

Henry Noble Cooper, Jr. " James Roland Pursell 

Campbell Stephen Collins 



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H. COOPER SALLIDAN 

PURSELL MEYER.. PETHYBRIDGE 
SMITH R. VANSANT PYRON BARNUM 



COLLINS DORAN WEBSTER NOTT 

SAVAGE OMEARA DAVIS H. BUTTON CAMPBELL 
MACDONALD GUNKEL KITTERMASTER EMMOND HEATH 



BEAL GRIFFIN SCHOBINGER WELLS K.COOPER M.DUTTON L. VANSANT MC ROBIE 



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Founded at Williams College, 183 / 
Active Chapters 42 Alumni Chapters 61 

ILLINOIS CHAPTER 
Established 1905 Colors— Blue and Gold 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Rev. Milton Waldo Irving West Johnson 

Ernest Marsh Vennum Wayne Alvin Johnson 

Louis Dallenbach 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Newton Alonzo Wells, M.P. Edward Carey Haves, Ph.D. 

Bruce Willet Benedict, B.S. William Trelease, D.Sc, LL.D. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Newton Anthony Wright Sven Duner 

Harold Sucese Johnson Edward Allen Williford 

William Bancroft Jarvis, Jr. 

Juniors 
Joseph Hume McCormack James Bruce Henderson 

Raymond Mooney George Mariel Clark 

Frank Howard Sutton James Marshall Wanzer 

Hans Peter Greison Arthur Helguson Mason 

Sophomores 
Gordon Otto Hanry Lewis Ford 

Byrd Henry Harrod Waldo Boynton Ames 

Estey William Gouwens Sidney Briggs Trelease 

Clyde Gobel Alwood Jack Kinsey 

Harry Hurert Porter Howard Ritchey Ferguson 

Freshmen 
John Benjamin Felmley John Howard Bannister 

Raymond Allen Washburn Edward Jefferson Scupham 

Thomas Hume McCormack Marry A. Thomas 

IIarwood Otto Edward Bean Hayes 

Special 

Charles Rannells Gibson 

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GOUWENS WANZER FERGUSON T. H. MC CORMACK ALWOOD MASON 

TOl^f T °rr 1 B D t NNISTER HENDERS0N AMES TRELEASE HAYES SCUPHAM 
TORTER THOMAS CLARK KINSEY SUTTON WASHBURN FELMLEY HARROD PRFTSfW 
MOONEY JARVIS JOHNSON W K ,CHT WILLIFORD GIBSON DUNER J HMC CORMACK 



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Founded at the University of Michigan, 1904 

Active Chapters 24 Alumni Chapters 1 

ILLINOIS CHAPTER 
Established April 28, 1906 COLORS— Old Gold and Black 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



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I<iii n Albert Morrow 
'William B. McKinley 
Clyde Hildebrand Walker 
Charles M. Walker 
Elvin Valentine Kratz 



Lynn Elmer Knorr 
Henry Woqdside Berks 
( )rval Lee Gearhart 
Maurice Charles Sjoblum 
Bonum Lee Kirk 



Glenn William McCune 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Nathan Clifford Ricker, D.Arch. 
John McBeath Snodgrass, B.S. 
George Enfield Frazer, A.B., LL.B. 
Karl John Theodore Ekblaw, M.S. 
Charles Frederick Hottes, Ph.D. 
Harry Gilbert Paul, Ph.D. 
Ralph Kent Hursh, B.S. 
Robert Taylor Jones, B.S. 
Leonard Vaughan James, M.S., E.E. 
Alonzo Plumstead Kratz, M.S. 
Ralph Raymond Danielson, B.S. 
Ray Thomas Stull, E.M. 
Major Franklin Daniel Webster 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Seniors 



Pembroke Houomi; Brown 
Frank Avery Bush 
Ralph LeRoy Hermann 
Edward Allen James 
Wayne Isaac Kirby 

Wallace B. Bain 
John Albion Chase 
Olix Robert Clements 
Joseph Elmer Feldman 
Erwin Franklin Miller 
Webster King Porter 

William Wilson Anderson 
William Stiles Haggott 
William Edgar Rominger 



*■* 



Juniors 



Pledge 



Idris Nelson 

Wilbur ( )tis Pendarvis 

Thomas Glenn Ratcliff 

Ray Iris Shawl 

Glenn Poland Vaughan 

Lawrence Reid Hubbard 
Vernon Harlow Kern 
( )ral Albert Lansche 
Richard Dunham 
Jack Allen Fitzgerrell 
Edward Allan Smith 

George Curtiss 

Lowell Lloyd Townsend 
L. S. Foote 



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MILLER FITZGERRELL TOWNSEND LANSCHE 

HUBBARD HERMANN BAIN ANDERSON KERN CLEMENTS DUNHAM 

KIRBY FELDMAN PORTER CURTISS WEBSTER ROMINGER SMITH DANIELSON 

PENDARVIS NELSON JAMES BROWN VAUGHAN BUSCH SHAWL RATCLIFF 



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fl Founded at Union College, 1X48 

Active Charges 28 Alumni Chapter- 25 

KAPPA DEUTERON CHARGE 
Established May so. 1008 Colors — Black, White and Blue 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Wallace Parke Foote Roy Vincent Edwards 

Rev. Ebenezek Bean William Chester Maguire 

Lester E. Frailly 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Edward Bartow, Ph.D. George Frisbie Whicher, A.M. 

Copelaxd Callax. E.M., M.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Herbert Jackson Moore Walter Clark Armstrong 

Homer Ward Deakmax Russel Claude Swope 

Clarence Milford Fergusox 

Juniors 

William A. Moore Fred Christopher Norlin 

Sidxey Dale Kirkpatrk k William Louis Ash beck 

Sophomores 

NormaN James Mallet Miltox Gans Silver 

Maxierre Barlow Ware William Stokely Carter 

IIexry Merritt Hager 

Pledges 

Robert B. Murphy Lloyd Havens Ghislin 

George Sidney Thompson Phillip Smith 

Jacob Allen Smith Harris Carson Crofts 

George David Snyder James William Shedden 

Robert Mearle Chittenden Joel Green 




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SNYDER CARTER A. SMITH NORLIN W. MOORE SILVER P SMITH 

MURPHY CHITTENDEN WARE MALLET HAGER SHEDDEN THOMPSON CHISLIN 

ASHBECK H. MOORE DEA'KMAN FERGUSON ARMSTRONG SWOPE KIRKPATRICK 



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Founded at Vincennes University, 1898 

Active Chapters 9 

PHI CHAPTER 
Established May 9. 1908 Colors— Lavender and \\ hite 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Harry Edward Kerker Ernest Thomas Hubbard 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

LeRoy Lang, M.S. Harrison August Buehe, B.S. 

Abner Richard Knight, M.E. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Alfred Michael Baker, Jr. LaForce Bailey 

Loren Cushing Bow I*a Newton Clover 

T Franklin Hedgcock, Jr. Louis John Hills 

Tomas Harold Lloyd Proctor Albert Nowlen 

Ellis T Potter Emery Vern Potter 

Clarence Milton Stoffel 

Juniors 

Clarfnce Eugene Fifield Paul Wetzel Mourning 

James Ray Nelson Royal Lee Smith 

Sophomores 

Toseph John Baker Nyle Jacob, Balbach 

Ronaid'Mitchell Fisher Claude Edward Horton 

Seeley Wright McGehee Donai d David Sharer 

George Leslie Smith John Wesley Smith 

Louis William Woltmann 

Freshmen 

Wilbur Barret Barber Fred Weaver Churchill 

Harry Anton Kirby Irwin Blaine Olin 

Newell Wiedemann George Alfred Wrisley 



350 



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OLIN J.W.SMITH MCGEHEE HORTON R.L.SMITH MOURNING SHARER 

FISHER J.J.BAKER CHURCHILL BARBER BALBACH WOLTMANN FIFIELD NELSON WIEDEMANN G.L.SMITH 
LLOYD STOFFEL E.J.POTTER HILLS A. M.BAKER E.V.POTTER HEDGCOCK BAILEY CLOVER BOW NOWLEN 




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Founded at Yale University, 1845 

Active Chapters 15 Alumni Chapters 9 

ETA CHAPTER 

Established May 28, 1908 Colors — Cardinal and Stone Gray 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Erle Roland Kelso Arthur Dechman 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Clyde Ross Newell, M.S. John J. Gardner, M.S. 

Edward Chauncey Baldwin, Ph.D. John D. Fitz-Gerald, II, Ph.D. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Clarence Gordon DeSwarte Arthur Jacob Benner 

Roland Eugene Leopold Leon Frank Swartz 

William Jacob Benner Russel Parks Baker 

Juniors 

George Mincke Wakefield Wesley William Polk 

Leon Arp.uckle Eugene Francis Pruett 

Arthur Christopher Raithel Yon Haller Brobeck 

Wilbur Edward Krebs James Summerfield Bartiiolow 

Harry Lea Owen Benjamin Franklin Rusy 

Albert Ayrton Farniiam Harry Reed Pendarvis 

Sophomores 

Robert Edward Polk George Otto Consoer 

LeRoy Christie Stiles Robert Schlemm 

Max Taylor Clarence Alfred Willmarth 

Alfred Werner Meyer Clarence Applegram 

Ward John Flock Karl John Kaiser 

Victor Stangel 

Freshmen 

George Sinclair Cuthbertson Charles Leslie Starkel 

Edward J. H. Warnshuis Harold Spear Reid 

John George Ykrington THEODORE Prison 

Andrew Edward Fleming 

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FLOCK WARNSHU1S KAISER 

R. E. POLK RA1THEL CUTHBERTSON RUSY APPLEGRAM STARKEL BARTHOLOW KREBS 

STILES SCHLEMM W.W.POLK REID PENDARVIS OWEN PRISON CONSOER 

YERINGTON STANGEL FARNHAM WILLMARTH FLEMING TAYLOR MEYER WAKEFIELD 

A. J. BENNER BAKER LEOPOLD PKUETT DE SWARTE ARBUCKLE W.J.BENNER SVVARTZ 



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Founded at New York University, 1846 
Active Chapters 24 

ALPHA EPSILON CHAPTER 
Established April, 1909 Color— White 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Jasper William Porter 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Francis Keese Wynkoop Drury, A.M., B.L.S. 
Herbert E. Metcalf 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Augustus Henry Grunewald, Jr. Haddon Spurgeon Kirk 
Joseph Columbus Hostetler, Jr. Albert Paul Peyraud 

Roger Thomas Welsh 

Juniors 

Raymond Edward Denz Edwin Shelby, Jr. 

Alexander Stuart Elton John Wesley Watson 

Mitchel Wolter 

Sophomores 

Eugene Francis Brazeau Thaddeus Lement Montgomery 

Elmer Clarence Dewey Jesse Ward Nelson 

Elton Thomas Mackie Kenneth Stoddard Wiiittemore 

Arthur Layton Barton 

Freshmen 

Walter Theobald Ritter Karl Heinrich Gewalt 

William Benton Hostetler Fred William Kaempfer 

Kenneth Wright Carr Marion Collier Troster 



354 



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MACKIE CARR HOSTETLER RITTER 

TROSTER NELSON WHITTEMORE KAEMPFER DEWEY MONTGOMERY 

BARTON GEWALT WOLTER WATSON ELTON DENZ BRAZEAU 

WELSH GRUNEWALD KIRK HOSTETLER PEYRAUD SHELBY 



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Founded at Massachusetts Agricultural College, 18J3 

Active Chapters 27 Alumni Chapters 12 

ALPHA DEUTERON CHAPTER 

Established May 9, 1910 Colors— Silver and Magenta 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Alvin Todd Burrows John Christian Dallenbach,M.D. 

Carl Martin Roefer Frank Stephens Leas 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Justus Watson Folsom, Sc.D. Harold Wilson Stewart, B.S. 

Robert C. Whitford, M.A. Henry Horace Hibbs, Jr., M.A. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 

Franklin Charles Palm 

Seniors 

Lawrence Samuel Brodd Chester McElfresh Crain 

Harold Leo Flodin Harold Arthur Talbert 

Clarence Clinton Wiedling 

Juniors 

Paul Donald Amsbary Dwight Irwin Johnston 

Carl Paul Ernst Arthur Maurice Metzler 

John Harold Heindel Waldo Lauff Schlueter 

David Tiiorsten Larsen 

Sophomores 

William Raliui Branch Franc John Gardner 

Kenneth Buchanan Frank Allyn Logan 

Hale Nicoles Byers Charles Henry Ruedi 

John Warren Teasdale III 

Freshmen 

Ambrose Otto Ambroz Charles Donovan Martin 

John Dietz Arthur Stone Van Deusen, Jr. 

David Wood Griffiths Louis Jacob Selzer 



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DIETZ AMBROZ GARDNER BRANCH BUCHANAN RUEDI MARTIN GRIFFITH 

PALM BYERS TEASDALE M ETZLER AMSBARY LOGAN HEINDEL VAN DEUSEN JOHNSTON 
• SCHLUETER WIEDLING TALBERT FLODIN BRODD CRAIN LARSEN ERNST 




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Founded at Union College, /#JJ 
Active Chapters 24 



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Colors — Garnet and Gold 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Charles Wallace Graham Charles T. Moss, M.D. 



Fred Henry Rankin 
Frederick Green, LL.B., A.M. 
Charles Melville Moss, Ph.D. 
Harrison Fred Gonnerman, B.S 
Joseph Harvey Checkley, B.S 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Orin Elmer Staples 
John Morton Pomeroy, Jr., LL.B. 
Stephen Osgood Andros, A.B., B.S. 
Wilhelm Miller, Ph.D. 
Henry J. Weiland, B.S. 



Charles Mulford Robinson, A.M. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
Joseph Conrad Lawless 

Seniors 

Daniel Franklin Comstock Crane Simpson Bruner 

Harvey Henry Walters Harry Edwin Webber 

John Latimer McKeown James Dale Thom 

Herman Walter Jacobsen George William Haan 

Milton Owen Jensen 

Juniors 
Dudley Winthrop Crane Homer Edward Lidster 

Oscar Robert Zipf, Jr. Elliott Strong Miller 

John DeWitt Culp Vernon Wilbur Behel 

Arthur Charles Zimmermann James Wright Shoemaker 

Robert James Goodrich 



Christian Gross 
Charles Raymond Gross 
Basil Philip Babcock 
Walter Louis Doremus 



Sophomores 

Richard Baxter Foster 
Eugene Canfield Hopkins 
Wesley Arthur Behel 
Frederick William Patton 



Freshmen 



Francis Clark Hardie 
Warren Joseph Alcock 

Charles Roy McEldowney 



John Manchester Cook 
Frank Joseph Von Ach 
Walter Elliott Hayne 



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ALCOCK W. BEHEL HOPKINS HAYNE C. GROSS MC ELDOWNEY DOREMUS 

HARDIE VON ACH COOK FOSTER R. GROSS SHOEMAKER GOODRICH PATTON 

BABCOCK HAAN ZIMMERMAN V. BEHEL MILLER LIDSTER CULP ZIPF CRANE 

WEILAND LAWLESS THOM BRUNER WEBBER COMSTOCK MC KEOWN WALTERS JACOBSEN JENSEN 



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Active Chapters 25 

ILLINOIS CHAPTER 
Founded at Hamilton College, 1832 Established at Illinois, 191, 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Roger F. Little 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Herbert Jewett Barton, A.M. Roy Newton Fargo, B.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Roswell Francis Field William Hoskins, Jr. 

Edward Alden Cooper Clare Curtis Gamble 

Archibald Farley Kirkland Arnold Edward Menke 

Paul Glenn Allen 

Juniors 

Loyal Bergen Wheelock Donald Kenneth Searles 

Harold Lucien Parr Donald Mitchell Glover 

Richard David Firebaugh 

Sophomores 

George Ross Hall Henry William Markwardt 

Charles Warren Campbell Edwin George Roos 

Richard Condon Barler Warren Badger Ewer 

Charles Lee Weems Julian Heouembourg Needler 

Freshmen 

John Blair Macauley, ]r. George Snow Valentine, Jr. 

Robert William Phalen Clarence Van Nostrian Fisher 

Herbert Alfred Knight Hiram Wodrich Moore 

Robert Tatman Williams Byron Robert Huff 

John Newton Rollo 



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CAMPBELL FISHER HUFF MACAULEY KNIGHT VALENTINE 

PHALEN MOORE MARKWARDT BARLER WILLIAMS ROOS 

EWER HALL SEARLE PARR FIREBAUGH WHEELOCK WEEMS 

KIRKLAND HOSKINS COOPER FIELD GAMBLE MENKE ALLEN GLOVER 



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Founded at Illinois Wesleyan University, 1899 

Active Chapters 5 Alumni Chapters 3 

GAMMA CHAPTER 

Established Feb. 3, 1912 Colors — Cherry and Gray 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Lorren Clifford Hill 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Wilbur Roy Leighty, B.S. Ward Hanson Sachs, B.S. 

George Marsh Higgins, B.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduates 

Jesse Leroy Conel, B.S., M.S. Henry Alfred Burd, B.A., M.A. 

Seniors 

Verne Foster Dobbins Guy Harold Husted 

John Christian Kuhns Joseph Morgan Noble 

Lee Alfred Husted Walter Henry Halas 

Juniors 

Walter Andrew Stahl Stanley Edwin Lindstrom 

Elmer Ellsworth Fiero Miles John McClelland 

Elmer Henry Stumpf Wayne Snyder Leighty 

Fred Raney Miller Kenneth Dwight Ross 

Harold James Donaldson Claude Raibourn 

Clarence Sedgwick Moss Samuel Meyers Goldschmidt 

Sophomores 

j. S. Marsh Paul Albert Raibourn 

William Allen Brittin, Jr. Ray James Woods 

Ralph Charles Woods Charles Shattuck Palmer 

Frank Stewart John Rea Amsbruster 

Freshmen 

Fanshawe Martin Keyes Charles Culbertson Burgett 

George Stanley Halas Charles William Bates 

Richard Ladd Worcester Max Robert Hoffman 

Ralph Randolph Winkelman Bransford L. Adelsberglr 

Merle Raymond Husted 



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WORCESTER G. HUSTED MCCLELLAND STEWART W. HALAS ADELSBERGER BRITTIN C. HALAS BATES 
AMBRUSTER MARSH ROSS GOLDSCHMIDT LINDSTROM R.C.WOODS STUMPF BURGETT P. RAIBOURN 

C. RAIBOURN KUHNS STAHL MILLER DOBBINS L. HUSTED NOBLE DONALDSON FIERO 

WINKELMAN KEYES HOFFMAN M. HUSTED MOSS LEIGHTY PALMER R. J. WOODS 



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Founded at Brown University, 1886 
Active Chapters 4 Alumni Chapters 2 

BETA CHAPTER 
Established at Illinois May 16, IQI2 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

E. C. English W. F. Woods 

P. P. SCHAEFER J. J- MCQUAID 

W. B. Hayes R. J- O'Brien 

W. J. DOLAN C. W. NUNAN 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Edward H. Morrissly S. Care Linisarger 

V. D. Cylkowski 

Juniors 

F. Dickerson Griffith John F. Doyle 
Albert J. Nolan Thomas A. Hagan 

Leo P. Kurt 

Sophomores 

John T. Lewis John J. Real 

T. Treston McEvoy J. Kenneth Stringer 

Leo P.. Hardiman Paul V. Galvin 

Emmet G. Martin Aloysius L. Lenzfn 

Blrnard V. Lighter John M. Normile 

Lester T. Mac Caue 

Freshmen 

William F. Burke Leon J. Baker 

Edward G. Brya Edward B. McLee 

Frank J. Hartigan William F. Doyle 

Pledge 

Ralph J. Murphy 



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MARTIN BAKER HARTIGAN CALVIN LENZEN 

O'BRIEN LEWIS LICHTER STRINGER NORMILE MCLEE 

BURKE HARDIMAN W.DOYLE MC EVOY MC CABE REAL BYRA 

J.DOYLE NOLAN LINBARGER MORRISSEY CYLKOWSKI GRIFFITH HAGAN KURT 



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Founded at Princeton University, 1824 
1 Active Chapters 21 

SIGMA CHAPTER 
Established May 17, 1912 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

George Freeman Senneff Trevor Morse Heath 

Paul Newhall Davis Lennox Francois Armstrong 

Philip George Schiesswohl Clifford Firoved Hood 

John Mead Silkman 

Juniors 

Edward Stevenson Block Oliver John Neslage 

Emil Hjalmer Westlund Carl Theodore Meyer 

Ralph I, oris Schiesswohl 

Sophomores 

Alwin August Jones Victor Hubert Grossberg 

Irving Byron Countryman Gordon Francis Cadisch 

Haroed Francis Woodvatt Elmer Theodor Janssen 

Freshmen 

Horace Manseau Armstrong Ralph Lindsay Ingram 

Paul Leo Armstrong Robert Phineas Sheaff 

Peter Jay Park Clarence Fasti. ake Snell 

Merrill Manning Benson Dement Schuler 

James Nicks Cost Emerson Wilson Brewer 



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INGRAM SCHULER P. ARMSTRONG PARKS H. ARMSTRONG 

COST SNELL BENSON GROSSBERG JANSSEN COUNTRYMAN SCHEAFF 

JONES CADISCH R. SCHEISSWOHL WESTLUND NESLAGE MEYER BLOCK WOODYATT 

HEATH L. ARMSTRONG SENNEFF P. SCHEISSWOHL HOOD DAVIS SILKMAN 



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Founded at Union College, 1841 

Colors — Purple and Gold 
ALPHA ZETA DELTA 

Established May 25, 1912 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Howard Ridgeway Vaughn, A.B., D.D. 
Edward O'Neil 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduates 
Emil Joseph Anderle, B.S. Jerome Head, B.S. 

Seniors 
Wesley Kaylor Norris Ralph Grover Perry 



Juniors 



Waldren Henry Hough 
Robert Bruce Zinser 
James Edward Hill 



Temple Hoyne Buell 
James Oliver Tupper 
Bruce Herbert Corzine 



Sophomores 
Glenwood Charles Tanton George Modiste Gehant 

Clarence Weiss Reuling Robert Ashman Perry 

Harold Cordes Schreiner Malcolm Douglas Roberts 

Charles Clinton Buell Roland Hall Lawrence 

Jerome Gillespie Roberts 



Fresh men 



Edward Emil Moi-ir 
Martin Clifford Rhodes 
Marvic Hecht Petersen 
Robert Hill Bolling 



Alan Freer Sharpe 
Richard Henderson Mallory 
Maurice Oberlin Bone 
Cecil Eaton Fraser 



William Harcourt Browne 



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BROWNE PETERSEN ERASER MOHR SHARPE CONE 

RHODES CORZINE SCHREINER M.D.ROBERTS GEHANT BOLLING MALLORV 

R. A. PERRY LAWRENCE J. G. ROBERTS TUPPER C. C. BUELL HILL TANTON REULING 

HEAD R. G. PERRY NORRIS AXDERLE HOUGH T. H. BUELL ZINSER 



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Founded at the College of the City of Neib York, 1898 
Active Chapters 20 Alumni Chapters 2 

RHO CHAPTER 
Established at Illinois, 1912 Colors — Light Blue and White 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Phillip A. Lowenstern 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Jonas B. Nathanson, M.S. 



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MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Seniors 
Ellis R. Goldman Nathan Cook Seidenberg 

Louis Ribback Jay L. Stern 

Juniors 
Abe S. Buhai Carroll A. Klein 

Sidney Casner Robert L. Moses 

Sophomores 
David S. Beilen Arthur S. Clamitz 

Jesse L. Bloch Francis Katlinsky 

Jerome J. Sholem 

Freshmen 
Melvin E. Davis Edwin R. Goodman 

Adrian J. Eichberg Walter S. Rose 

Bertram Feuer Philip Schloss 



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SCHLOSS CLAMITZ ROSE FEUER DAVIS EICHBERG GOODMAN 

SHOLEM KATLINSKY MOSES BUHAI IiOLCH BEILIN 

RIBBACK KLEIN GOLDMAN' SEIDENBERG CASNER NATHANSON STERN 



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Established 1906 Colors — Yale Blue and Gold 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
Clyde Frederick Weingartnee Perry Henry Graves 

Maurice Elon Hoit Lloyd Dunaway Knapp 

Ermane Gaylord Bucher Harold Lane Cummings 

Juniors 
Walter Louis Roleing Norvid Raymond Swanson 

John Turner Mills Walter Joseph Tilton 

Leslie Monroe Gumm 

Sophomores 
Cecil Walden Borton Bernhard Christian Halstrom 

Henry Ben Utter Walter Hontoon BonDurant 

Thomas Oscar Moffett Lyle Wilbur Hines 

Thomas Willtam Tolmie W. B. Rundle 

Freshmen 
Fred Barron Gallagher Millard Forrest Bovard 

George Henry Ranney James Bruce Jarrett 

Arthur LaY x erne Kline John Hale Hackley 

Elmer Ambrose Borg Carl Clegg 

Arthur Lewis Francis 



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BORG HINDS BORTON RANNEY FRANCIS 

UTTER GALLAGHER CLEGG HALSTROM BOVARD MOFFETT 

KLINE JARRETT MILLS TILTON GUMM HACKLEY BON DURANT 

SVVANSON WEINGARTNER CUMMINGS HOIT KNAPP DUCHER GRAVES ROHLFING 



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Established at Illinois, 1907 Colors— Purple and White 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Archie Henry Hubbard Arthur Crist Strong 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Frank R. Smedley 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Charles Edgar Trowbridge Sylvester Randall Derby 

Andrew Baker Hammitt Roland Everett Greenberg 

Raymond Harry Purdy 

Juniors 
Arnold Carl Holinger, Jr. Arthur Edward Tillson 

Warren Platt Beanbien Silas Max Trumbo 

hovey worsdell dodge 

Sophomores 
George Charles Darrell Lowell Hafner Tuttle 

Tohn Ekern Ott Frank Roy Babcock 

Herald B. Fites Norman McKinney 

Freshmen 

Frederick Casper Kalthoff William Oliver Trowbridge 

Francis Stanley Storey Glenn Horace Mills 

Vivian Earle Tillson James Madtson Gray 

Daniel Webster Hickey 

Pledge 

John Virtus Lund 



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STOREY MILLS W. TROWBRIDGE KALTHOFF GRAY V. E. TILLSON 

DODGE FITES BABCOCK MC KINNEY TUTTLE OTT DARRELL LUND 

HOLINGER BEAUBIEN GREENBURG HAMMITT PURDY DERBY C.TROWBRIDGE A. TILLSON TRUMBO 



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Founded at Illinois, ipo8 Colors — Purple and Gold 

RESIDENT MEMBER 
E. Glen Hersman 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Henry Baldwin Ward, Ph.D. William Horace Raynor, B.S. 

Wilbur Jerome Carmichael, B.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
Joseph Howard Hinshaw 

Seniors 
Edward Charles Elles Charles Prior Winters 

Clovis Ward Lincoln Milton Nels Nelson 

Juniors 

Forrest Bebb Bertram Mills Kisselburg 

David Oris Conley Elmo Paul Hohman 

Norman Joseph Lenhart Arthur Roland Elliott 

Walter William Shelden Oliver John Troster 

Sophomores 
Stanley J. Thomas Paul K. Van Winkle 

Lorin Vaughan Cope Curt Card Lundeen 

Rudolph Earl Shallberg Russell Leamer McKown 

Arthur N. Lungren 

Freshmen 

Laurence Elias Hill Lawrence Morse Winters 

Burton Eldred King Frank English 

Edwin Stuart Moberley William Henry Schneider 

Pledge 
Jay Reichenbach 






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HILL L. WINTERS ENGLISH KING 

MOBERLY THOMAS LCNDGREN VAN WINKLE SHALLBERG COPE LUNDEEN 

MCKOWN BEBB ELLIOTT KISSELBURG TROSTER HOHMAN 

SHELDEN ('.WINTERS NELSON LINCOLN ELLES HINSHAW CONLEY 




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Founded in 1911 
Colors — Royal Purple and Gold 

RESIDENT MEMBER 
Frank Dean Garland 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Linn Helander Fred Alan DuHadway 

Disk Sylvester Frayer Roe Niver 

Juniors 

Merle Francis Lummis John Pieper 

Kenneth Burman Bush Fred Nathaniel Vibelius 

Herbert Edgar Smith Francis Marion Van Natter 

Raymond Stanley Scholl 

Sophomores 

Earnest Hubbard Gay Irwin Lytle Lummis 

Felix Arno Gunther Harry Quick 

Carl Christopher Citizen James Leslie Fox 

Pledges 

Ralph Wendell Hummeland Oswald Howell Williams 

James Graydon Threlkeld Lorraine Charles Strubinger 

Earl Willis Bailey Harold Frederick Kraus 



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I. L. LUMMIS GAY VIBELIUS SMITH FOX GUNTHER 

M.F.LUMMIS HELANDER NIVER FRAYER DU HADVVAY BUSH PIF.PER 



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Established at Illinois, 1911 Colors — Maise and Pale Blue 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
Charles II. Stone, U.S., M.A. 

Settlors 
Harry G. Menke Charles M. Rundles 

Lenton W. James Robert S. Lutz 

Harold B. Rose John W. Dammers 

Lloyd W. Rundles 

Juniors 

Alexander S. Henderson Harold A. Mann 

Herbert Z. Mueller Loyd J. Oyler 

Gustav C. Klippel Merle L. Smith 

Arthur B. Christopher 

Sophomores 
John W. Needham Edwin W. Rapp 

Russell D. Barnes George M. Cullinane 

Paul A. Beindorf Arthur W. Fleck 

Montrose P. McArdle 

Pledges 
Alvin O. Wiese Charles C. Lenz 



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BEINDORF STONE NEEDHAM FLECK MC ARDLE VVIESE 

BARNES RAPP OYLER MUELLER HENDERSON KLIPPEL SMITH CHRISTOPHER CULLINANE 

DAMMERS JAMES RUNDLES ROSE MENKE RUNDLE LUTZ MANN 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



Established 1911 Colors— Blue and White 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Charles Elmer Durst, M.S. Duane Taylor Englis, M.S. 

Clarence Barbre, A.I!., B.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
Newton Lyman Partridge, M.S. 

Seniors 
Arthur B. Bingham G. Heath Lindsey 

Alden Knowlton Fogg Ernest W. Seyster 

Walker Anderson Henry Winfred Thurston, Jr. 

Maynard Elmer Slater George Burr McMillan 

Buford M. Stubblefield Fred R. Powers 

Juniors 
Ernest W. Cobb W. B. Meiseniielder 

Hugh Grigsby Elywn T. Gants 

Eugene Hamill David R. Jones 

Richard J. Moore 

Sophomores 
Edward S. Axline G. G. Webster 

Glenn Carritiiers Homer W. McCoy 

Freshmen 

Harold Tecumseii Meek Clarence Anderson 

G. Harry Reichelderfer William Francis Coolidce 

Ralph P. Farrend 



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JONES MCCOY COOLIDGE C.ANDERSON FARRAND REICHELDERFER MEISENHELDER CANTS WEBSTER 

GRIGSBY ENGLIS DURST BARBRE BOLEYN MOORE COBB CARRITHERS AXLINE 
MCMILLAN SEYSTER SLATER THURSTON FOGG BINGHAM POWERS LINDSEY STUBBLEFIELD W.ANDERSON 



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f st Pelta 



Flower — Chrysanthemum 



Colors — Red and Blue 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Seniors 



Raymond Leffel Snoddy 
Leo Daniel Marquis 

Albert William Keese 



Harold Higbee Roberts 
Bayard Hand Clark 



Royal Wayne Ritchey 
Earle Underwood Rugg 
William Webb Wilson 



Juniors 



Park West Freak k 
Fred Charles IIahn 



Sophomores 
Dwight Ray Martin Lawrence Francis Draper 

Dwight L. Mink Robert Elmer Copper 

Alfred William Thurston Homer Goldsmith Keese 



Ray Henry Freark 
Robert Cessna 



Freshmen 



Lewis Faugh n Marquis 
Leslie Parker Livengood 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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f si Pelta 




L. F. MARQUIS H. KEESE COPPER LIVENGOOD THURSTON R. FREARK 

DRAPER P. FREARK CLARK CESSNA MARTIN MINK HAHN 

A. KEESE RITCHEY RUGG SNODDY L. D. MARQUIS WILSON ROBERTS 




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Founded 1914 Colors — Blue and White 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Robert Edwin Kennedy, B.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
Edwin Louis Beifuss Frank Henderson 

Guy Chandler Fulton Roy Simeon Lundin 

Charles Hartman McCauley 

Juniors 
Harry Andrews Thomas Earle Carpenter 

Herbert Richard Behr Stanley Hansen 

Robert Sommerville Black Leo Gabriel Harris 

Lee Russel Carlson Cyril Sven Linder 

Charles Norton Owen 

Sophomores 
Harold John Bluhm Charles Rufus Coultas 

William Edgar Brotherton Howard Stanley Gantz 

Harry Leslie Clayton John William Hilbert 

Howard William Cobley Frank Asberry Leggitt 

Donald Sidney Cornell Fred William Leggitt 

Freshmen 
Albert Vergil Hardesty Harry Matthew Littleton 

Leonidas Logan Smith 



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LITTLETON HARRIS GANT2 CLAYTON 

COBLEY BLUHM OWEN HANSEN CARPENTER COULTAS SMITH 

BEHR BROTHERTON HILBERT CORNELL HARDESTY BLACK LINDER 

F. W. LEGGITT ANDREWS FULTON LUNDIN MC CAULEY HENDERSON BEIFUSS CARLSON F. A. LEGGITT 



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ORGANIZATIONS 

Founded ipoy 
Active Chapters 31 

ILLINOIS CHAPTER 
Established June 10, 1908 Colors— Cardinal and White 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
President E. J. James Dean T. A. Clark 



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E. G. Hersman 

C. Lloyd 

Rev. A. R. Vail 



Rabindra Nath Tagore 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
I. Kuhn 
Dr. A. B. Mason 
Dr. C. B. Warner 
R. P. Zimmerman 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Prof. E. C. Baldwin Prof. Morgan Brooks 

Dr. C. V. Boyer Prof. H. A. Hollister 

Simon Litman Prof. T. B. Oliver 

Dr. B. E. Powell Prof. F. H. Rankin 

Prof. H. J. Vandenberg Prof. W. F. Schultz 

Prof. A. R. Seymour Prof. E. H. Waldo 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



L. Allen 
E. A. Gomez 
J. C. Ross 
C. W. Bade 

H. C. Albin 
T. H. Chan 
B. E. Dirks 
J. H. Jue 
M. Rukin 
O. W. Allen 



Graduate 
C. Y. Hsu 
L. L. Ossa 
E. M. Geilling 
T. H. Hsu 

Seniors 
H. P. Chand 
H. Dubin 
W. A. Morkel 
E. W. Seyster 
C. H. Bade 
L. S. Chen 
T. C. Hao 

T. H. Liang 



W. Pung 

F. E. Geldenhuys 

H. D. Leslie 

H. M. Westergaard 

N. K. Nag 

C. S. Washburne 

S. Barman 

Y. T. Cheng 

R. B. Hinman 

B. C. Ray 

H. S. Woolf 



Juniors 
]. T. Auten f. K. Barber C. R. Lopez 

F. W. Nichols E. R. O'Conner L. W. Reese 
C. E. Smith K. K. Wang 

Sophomores 
J. H. Castro Z. Hsieii W. Rang 

V. A. Ochoa H. T. Wood P. I. Zaleski 

T. L. Chang 

Freshmen 
H. E. Barber W. M. Hinman D. Horwicii 
N. C. Mackey A. Rodiguf.z 



K. Nakada 
E. R. Schulz 
T. C. Wang 

S. T. Leo 
T. K. Lin 

C. GONZAGO 

R. S. Jain 
S. A. Walser 



388 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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(Cosmopolitan (Elnb 




CHILLING CASTRO C. W. BADE T. H. HSU GELDENHUYS WESTERGAARD DIRKS SMITH C. H. BADE NICHOLS 

RUKIN 
OCHOA MACKEY WALSER WASHBURNE HINMAN JUE CHAN CHANG CHENG OSSA GONZAGO 

ZALESKI CHAND 
HAO RAY KANG LIANG BORROMEO HORWICH GOMEZ HERSMAN AUTEN JAIN T.C.WANG REESE 
C. Y. HSU RODIGUEZ 0. W. ALLEN H. BARBER L. ALLEN POWELL SEYMOUR VAIL BALDWIN ZIMMERMAN 

LOPEZ SEYSTER K. K. WANG 
LITMAN SCHULTZ VANDENBERG BARMAN K.BARBER B. HINMAN MORKEL DUBIN ROSS BROOKS 

OLIVER LEO 



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O R G A N T 7. A T I O N S 



(Hljinese J^tufonts' flLUth 



OFFICERS 

Y. T. Cheng President K. K. Wong 

J. H. Jue Vice-President Miss Lee Ma-i.i 

T. K. Lin Chinese Secretary H. F. Boggs 

S. T. Leo English Secretary W. C. Tao 

IT. F. Boggs Treasurer L. S. Chen 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



I 







Post Graduates 






C. Y. Hsu 




A. P. Low 




W. T. Tao 


T. H. Hsu 




N. C. Shum 
Miss Mali Lee 

Seniors 




Y. Young 


T. H. Chan 




G. H. Hu 




T. H. Liang 


Y. T. Cheng 




J. H. Jue 




Miss H. D. Lin 


K 


. K. Feng 


T. H. 


Pan hoe 






Juniors 






H. F. Boggs 




T. C. Hao 




T. C. Wang 


T. T. Chang 




M. C. Sheng 




C. T. Lu 


L. S. Chen 




K. K. Wang 




W. Y. Wu 




C. L. Liang 




Z. Hsieii 






Sophomores 






C. L. Bau 




C. Y. Lee 




Y. K. Wong 


T. L. Chang 




T. K. Lin 




Y. Woo 


Q. K. Chen 




W. N. Mah 




A. C. Lee 


Y. N. Fung 




T. C. Shen 




S. T. Leo 


C. L. Hsun 




B. C. Tsen 




T. S. Yang 


G. C. 


Yee 


Y. T. 
Freshmen 


Miao 




Y. C. Chen 




N. Y. Liu 




S. K. Li 


Y. Y. Chan 




G. T. OUYANG 




Y. T. Liang 


I. T. Chen 




C. T. Shing 




H. C. Yu 


S. K. Cheung 




T. C. Tong 




L. Liang 


B. C. Cnov 




C. F. Tu 




E. L. Sun 


T. C. Hoo 




T. Lauphit 




T. S. Lice 


C. II SI Ell 




Miss Esther Lee- 

Pledges 
J. Y. Cnov 


-Tom a 


T. N. Lee 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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C.L.BAU C.L.LIANG T.H.HSU W.Y.WU S.K.CHEUNG A.P.LOW 
W.N.MAH K.Y.WONG Y.N.FUNG Q.K.CHEN T.H.LIANG T.C.WANG T.T.CHEUNG T.S.LEE 
J.F.O.YAPP W.KANG K.K.FENG Z.HSIEH L.S.CHEN C.T.LU T.C.HAO T.Y. LIANG W.T.TAO C.F.TU 
B.C.CHOY T.C.TONG A.C.LEE J.Y.CHOY Y.T.MIAO T.S.YOUNG C.T.SHEN Y.Y.CHEN T.L.CHANG T.LAUPHIT 
C.Y.LEE G.HU S.T.LEO T.K.LIN H.D.LIN Y.T.CHENG E.LEE-TOMA K.K.WANG M.LEE C.Y.HSU H.F.BOGGS 
J.T.CHEN H.C.YU T.C.HOO Y.C.CHEN C.HSIEH E.L.SUN d.L.SHUN T.NiEE Y.Y.VoUNG L.LEE 
T.H.CHAN A.M.YIM G.T.OUYANG N.C.SHUM G.O.YEE Y.WOO S.K.LI 



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ORG ANIZATIONS 




IHappa JMplja £Jit 



Founded at the University of Indiana, lgn 
Active Chapters 3 Alumni Chapters 1 

BETA CHAPTER 
Established February, 19 13 Colors — Crimson and Cream 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Rev. H. W. Jameson, A.B., LL.B. George C. Ellis, A.B. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Seniors 
W. J. Prince B. F. Kenner E. A. Brown 

Juniors 

S. B. Simmons 

Sophomores 
W. H. Sutton T. H. Hardpole M. J. Perry 

Freshmen 
E. O. Rhodes T. C. Jones T. A. Mayo 

L. S. Cloyd C. L. Wilson T. H. Tackson 



H. H. Harris 
D. J. Amos 
II. R. Duke 




CLOYD JACKSON RHODES WILSON Sl'TTON DUKE 

MAYO HARDPOLE PERRY JONES SIMMONS 

HARRIS 1'KINCE ELLIS 1SKOWN KENNER AMOS 

392 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



Sororities 



NAME DATE OF FOUNDATION 

NATIONAL LOCAL 

Alphi Chi Omega 1885 1901 

Alpha Delta Pi 1851 191 2 

Alpha Omicron Pi 1897 191 1 

Alpha Xi Delta 1893 1906 

Chi Omega 1895 1900 

Delta Gamma 1874 1906 

Gamma Phi Beta 1874 19 13 

Kappa Alpha Theta 1870 1897 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 1870 1899 

Pi Beta Phi 1867 1897 

Sigma Kappa 1874 1906 



UMBER OF 




LOCAL 


NUMBER IN 


MEMBERS 


HOUSE 


21 


19 


H 


10 


23 


9 


24 


22 


31 
29 


21 
16 


24 


17 


30 


19 


27 

25 
21 


20 
18 
16 



(As at June 1, 1914). 



396 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




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Gilds' |Jmt H^llemt JVsstfaattmr 

1913-1914 

OFFICERS 

Irma A. Latzer President 

Hilah Jane Link Secretary and Treasurer 



MEMBERS 



Alpha Chi Omega 
Marjorie June 
Maude Marks 

Alpha Xi Delta 
Bess East 
Pearl Bernhardt 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Margaret Perry 
Evelyn Gehant 

Delta Gamma 

May Babcock 
Lenore Richards 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 
Amelia Kellogg 
Irene Liggett 



Kappa Alpha Theta 
Hilah Jane Link 
Marguerite Bennett 

Alpha Omicron Pi 
Anna Hoffert 
Opal Trost 

Sigma Kappa 

Dorothy Armington 
May Miles 

Chi Omega 

Dorothy Rinaker 

Lillian Thompson 

Pi Beta Phi 

Frances Keen 
Mary Wheelhouse 



Gamma Phi Beta 
Irma Latzer 
Grace Geyer 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



Pappa <Alpl)a %\\ti<x 

Founded at DePauw University, January 27, 1870 



Active Chapters 36 
Established 1895 



Mrs. George Ramey 
Mrs. P. L. Windsor 
Mrs. W. A. Oldfather 
Mrs. D. F. MacFarland 
Mrs. James Finch 
Mrs. Cyrus Newcomb 
Alta Swigart 
Alice Riley 
Julia Mattis 
Anna Stale y 

Marion 



DELTA CHAPTER 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Alumni Chapters 30 
Colors — Black and Gold 



Mrs. E. M. Glenn 
Mrs. Paul Busey 
Mrs. A. Eisner, Jr. 
Mrs. E. B. Lytle 
Mrs. T. H. Guild 
Mrs. Griffin 
Mrs. Bess B. Kelso 
Hazel Davidson 
Ethel Ricker 
Elizabeth Greene 
Perctval Marc 



Mrs. R. A. Jones 
Mrs. J. A. Brown 
Mrs. T. J. Colvin 
Mrs. A. M. Danley 
Mrs. A. D. Mulliken 
Mrs. Roy Edwards 
Juliet Scott 
Isabel Jones 
Louise Zilly 
Agnes Zilly 
aret Harris 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Sabra Stevens, A.B. 



Mary Torrance, A.B. 
Stella Hague 



Marion Leatherman,A.B. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Ethel Sabin 
Mary Davis 



Graduates 
Mildred Bishop 
Harriet B. Merrill 



Margaret Williams 
Rose Mather 



Maude Bull 

Jane Link 



Pauline Adams 
Helen Whipple 



Seniors 

Hortense Wickard 
Beatrice Copley 
Juanita Richardson 

Juniors 

Frances Klank 
Vivian King 
Marguerite Bennett 



Hortense Gettys 
Ruth Fruland 
Patience Pennewill 
Eleanor Babbitt 
Helen Johnson 
Cecilia Ward 

Marian McConnel 
Gertrude Sawyer 
Helen e Doty 



Sophomores 



Freshmen 



Stella Percival 
Elizabeth Harris 
Faith Swigart 
Lois Philbrick 
Leone Merritt 
Ethel Spencer 

Dorothy Doty 
Gladys Lovewell 
Alice Chesley 



398 



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GETTYS BABBITT MERRITT LOVEWELL CHESLEY H.DOTY D. DOTY MCCONNEL SAWYER 

BENNETT PHILBRICK WARD PERCIVAL PENNEWILL JOHNSON FRULAND HARRIS SPENCER SWIGART 

KING ADAMS RICHARDSON WHIPPLE KLANK WICKARD LINK COPLEY BULL 



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Active Chapters 48 



ORGANIZATIONS 



|3t Pete p|t 

Founded at Monmouth College, 1S67 



Alumni Chapters 32 



[LLINOIS ZETA CHAPTER 
Established October 26, 1895 Colors— Wine and Silver Blue 

Flower — Wine Carnation 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



L 



Mrs. A. L. Stern 
Mrs. W. E. Stears 
Mrs. George Fairclo 
Mrs. A. M. Stoolman 
Mrs. 1 Iarry 1 [ERRICK 
.Mrs. (i. A. Huff 
Mrs. D. C. Morrissey 
Mrs. Maurice Hecker 
Mrs. Royal A. Stipes 
Mrs. Eunice Weaver 
Mrs. E. S. Swtgart 
Mrs. Harold Rugg 
Mrs. F. W. Scott 
Mrs. E. E. Pilcher 



Mrs. Ran- Sparks 

Mrs. D. R. Enochs 

Mrs. Libbv Brookes Caddis 

Katharine Doyle 

Vera Turrell 

( Jertrude Harnsbargeb 

Nelle Signor 

Katherine McIntosh 

Melissa Turrell 

Inez Turrell 

Hazel Craig 

Ruth Signor 

Mrs. Hugo Branyan 

Tessie Gaddis 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Margaret Stanton, B.S., A.M. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Graduate 



Madge Myers 



Erma Elliott 



Genevieve Alvord 
Mildred Forkey 
Ruth Ouesenberry 



Hannah Harris 
Grace Flood 
Marjorie Spalding 



Idress Alvord 

Seniors 

Frances Keen 

Juniors 

Salome Balkema 

Sophomores 

Helen Sawers 
Freshmen 



Mary Wheelhouse 
Catherine Parks 
Agnes Wright 



Louise Waterman 
I ean Roberts 
Marion White 



Elizabeth Wheelhouse 
Alberta Andrews 

Anne Siemens 
Autha Fluke 



Sara Moore 
Frances Webster 
Margaret 1 Iunter 
Ma kin a Finnigan 



Francelia Sargent 

400 



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QUESENBERRY KEEN BALKEMA E. WHEELHOUSE HUNTER HARRIS PARKS SAWERS 
ELLIOTT MOORE SIEMENS SARGENT ANDREWS M. WHEELHOUSE MYERS WRIGHT 

FINNIGAN WHITE WEBSTER FLUKE FORKEY ALVORD WATERMAN FLOOD 



401 




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Founded at Monmouth College, 1S/0 



Active Chapters 38 



BETA LAMBDA CHAPTER 



Established April 28, 1899 



Colors — Dark and Light Blue 



Elower — Fleur-de-lis 
RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Mrs. A. F. Fay 
Mrs. Frank Smith 
Mrs. D. C. Bagley 
Mrs. A. P. Carman 
Mrs. R. S. Blatchley 
Mrs. J. S. Mason 



Mrs. G. A. Shook 
Mrs. G. F. Whicher 
Mrs. O. S. Watkins 
Mrs. H. P. Gulick 
Jennie Craig 
Helen James 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Frances Simpson, B.L.S. Margaret M. Herdman, A.B. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Seniors 



Eugenia Rutherford 
Katherine Seaman 
Amelia Kellogg 



Olive Hormel 
Mildred Drew 
Helen Brown 
Pauline Halliwell 
Dorothy Hormel 
Irene Liggett 



Gratia Reed 
Juniors 



Florence Yoch 
Laura Alband 
Mildred Scroggin 



Harriet Barto 
Laura Hirth 
Dorothy Chew 
Helen Davis 
Mae Sexauer 
Georgia Castleberry 



Laura Bardwell 
Sophomores 



Margaret Eyman 
Florence Rutherford 



Helen Gabel 
Doris Roach 



Margaret Barto 
Freshmen 



Elizabeth Armstrong 
f.lea nor jewett 
Jean Mason 



Rowena Kohl 
Marvine Campbell 
Helen Ludlow 



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^appa ^Kappa (Smtmra 



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KELLOGG F.RUTHERFORD D. HORMEL SEXAUER CASTLEBERRY JEWETT HALLIWELL BROWN 
E. RUTHERFORD GABEL YOCH HIRTH SCROGGIN REED CHEW BARDWELL 

LUDLOW MASON ARMSTRONG KOHL 0. HORMEL EYMAN CAMPBELL 

ROACH H. BARTO DREW SEAMEN ALBAND M. BARTO DAVIS LIGGETT 



403 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



Founded at De Pauw University, October 1885 
Active Chapters 20 Alumni Chapters 10 

IOTA CHAPTER 
Established December 8, iScjcj Colors — Scarlet and Olive Green 

Flower — Red Carnation 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



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Mrs. E. J. Townsend 
Mrs. David Kin ley 
Mrs. A. H. Daniels 
Mrs. W. W. Yapp 
Mrs. J. Taylor 
Mrs. F. Thomas 
Mrs. A. W. Palmer 
Mrs. R. M. Campbell 
Mrs. J. W. Huss 
Mrs. A. E. Huckins 
Mrs. I. A. Flanders 



Mrs. C. R. Elvis 
Helen Bryan 
Elizabeth Bryan 
Frances Busey 
Josephine Busey 
nondas walcott 
Mabel Haines 
Irene Burrill 
Mabel Chester 
Ola Wyeth 
Florence Kirkup 



Grace Morgan 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Ola Wyeth, A.M., B.L.S. Elizabeth Bryan, A.M., B.L.S. 

Florence Kirkup Stella Galpin, A.B., B.L.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 

Fay Fisher, A.B. 

Seniors 



Marjorie June 
Eve Weilepp 
Mary Ethel Todd 
Mary McNally 

Louise Am born 



Erna Goldsciimidt 
Maude Marks 
Mary Ann Boyd 

Lois Black 
Margaret Peale 
Cora Berger 
Mary Ethel Stevens 



Juniors 

Frances Marks 
Sophomores 



Amanda Kaar 
Mary Lawson 
Lora Can ada y 
Je.an Ripley 

Gretchen Gooch 



Freshmen 



Neva Bell 
Hazel Brunson 
Laura Weilepp 

Mary Ann Cross 
Helen Biddle 
Florence Quinn 
Margaret ( !rim mek 



404 



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JUpita (EI)i (©tttega 




GOLDSCHMIDT BIDDLE BERGER KAAR BLACK CANADAY GOOCH BELL 

LAWSON TODD JUNE AMBORN F. MARKS E. WEILEPP BRUNSON 

M.MARKS CROSS FISHER L. WEILEPP STEPHENS PEALE BOYD QUINN 



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CWji ©mega 



Founded at Arkansas University, 1895 
Active Chapters 29 Alumni Chapters 22 

OMICRON CHAPTER 

Colors — Cardinal and Straw 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Established June, 1900 



Bertha Harper 
Mathilda Voss 
Eanny De Wolfe 
Gertrude J. Gonnerman 
Mary Richie Nelson 
Bertha Jones 
Hazel Shaw 
Sarah Nixon Wright 
Mabel Warinner 
Elizbeth Voss 



Marguerite Dodds 

Glenn Dallenbach Caton 

Hazel Dallenbach 

Mildred Talbot 

Eva Dodds 

Roberta Wright 

Margaret Husted Sarrett 

Helen Shuck 

Pearl Goben 

Florence Smith 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Clarissa Rinaker, Ph.D. Queen Shepherd, Ph.D. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Seniors 



Dorothy Rinaker 
Ruth Robbins 
Clara Thorndike 

Ruth Gray 
Bern ice Stratton 
Lillian Thompson 
Alma Menig 



Beulaii Burrell 
Mary Craigmile 
Helen Kirkpatrick 
Frances Jones 
Cora Randolph 
Lillian Thomson 



Junior. 



Alice Dietzer 
Vera Wessels 
Florence Johnston 

Lois Dodds 
Ruth Lancaster 
Mary Bell 
Beatrice Prai.l 



Wilma Ponder 
Sophomores 



Rose Dennis 
Edna Mann 
Ann Voss 
Josephine Dodds 
Edna Decker 
Bonnie Hardesty 



Elizabeth Murduck 
Freshmen 



Helen Morris 
Rachel Talbot 



Mae W a ms ley 



Marie Wessels 
Loraine Ker 



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406 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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MORRIS TALBOT CRAIGMILE HARDESTY VVAMSLEY DENNIS KER RANDOLPH 

DECKER M. WESSELS MANN BURRELL THOMSON JONES VOSS 

LANCASTER GRAY KIRKPATRICK J. DODDS MENIC, L. DODDS THOMPSON BELL 

V. WESSELS STRATTON TIIORNDIKE D1ETZER JOHNSTON PRALL R1NAKER ROBBINS PONDER 



L 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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Active Chapters 20 



Founded at Lombard, Galesburg, /<?p? 



Alumni Chapters 13 



I 



KAPPA CHAPTER 

Established December 15, /005 Colors — Light Blue, Dark Blue, and Gold 

Flower — Pink Rose 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Madeline Dryer Kelso 
Luna Atkeson Sheets 
Leta Condit Miller 

BYNE ( iOODMAN 



Ruth Fielding Garland 
Mabel Fielding 
Mrs. Grover Mathews 
Nelle Branch 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Pearl Bernhardt Nell Barnes 

Grace La Frenz Abigail Fisher 

Florence Hunt 



Juniors 



Helen Fisher 
Josephine Bernhardt 
Marguerite Swits 
Emma Breitstadt 



Nelle Patterson 
Dorothy Brown 



Helen Collins 
Frances Perkins 



Marie Berlin 
Sophomores 

Lucile Jones 
Freshmen 

Lillian Ec.an 



Bess East 

Florence Ferguson 
Susan Hosford 
1 In. da Breitstadt 



Sylvia Gibson 
Catherine Retz 



Fern Shapland 
Daisy Reed 



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ORGANIZATIONS 







^Iplja Xi Pclta 




BERLIN J. BERNHARDT EAST RETZ SWITS SHAPLAND HOSFORD 

A.FISHER HUNT E. BREITSTADT GIBSON H. BREITSTADT PATTERSON BARNES P.BERNHARDT 

H. FISHER BROWN EGAN REED LA FRENZ COLLINS JONES PERKINS FERGUSON 



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Active Chapters 12 



Founded at Colby College, 1874 



Alumni Chapters 12 



THETA CHAPTER 

Established February 22, igo6 Colors — Maroon and Lavender 

Flower — Violet 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Hazel Elliot Keusink Lucile Tritt Savage 

Eloise Nation McCune Ethel Nation Park 

May Buchanan Catherine Chase 

Marcia Hatton 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Josh: Batcheller Houchens, B.L.S., A.M. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Graduates 



Amelia Gay 
Dorothy Armington 



Seniors 

Helen Dawson 
Juniors 



Ruth Heffernan 
Fannie Brooks 



Mary Butler 
May Miles 



Ruth Phillips 
Emilie Tener 
Katherine Tener 
i i azel 1 [urlburd 
1 [arriet Tames 



Clara Armington 
Olive Menz 



Charlotte Urbain 
Eugenie Allais 
Florence Campijell 



Sophomores 



Eunice Miles 

Freshmen 



Helen 1! arrows 
Lilly Kendall 

M.H'RINE Al.I.ARl) 

1 [azel Allard 
Tosephine Nichols 



Gladys Naden 
Muriel Hill 



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C. ARMINGTON AI.LA1S BE-ILL HURLBURU BARROWS H. ALLARD DAWSON 

D. ARMINGTON M. ALLARD K. TENER E.TENER NICHOLS MENZ CAMPBELL 
JAMES URBAIN PHILLIPS NADEN M.BUTLER MILES KENDALL 



411 



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IBcIta CSamma 

Founded at the University of Mississippi. 1873 
Active Chapters 2(1 Alumni Chapters 21 

IOTA CHAPTER 

Established May 12, 1906 Colors — Bronze. Pink and Blue 

Flower — White Rose 



I 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Mrs. Joel Stebbins 
Mrs. Sleeter Bull 
Mrs. George Flom 
Mrs. Philip Wegeng 
Mabel Ricketts 
Clara Ricketts 
Mrs. Earl Saunders 



Avis Gwinn 

Ethel Gwinn 

Mrs. Alfred Gunderson 

Mrs. Lawrence Fogelsong 
Mrs. Frederick Russell 
Margaret Murray 
Helen Gere 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Julia Harper. A.B. Elizabeth Brush, A.M. 

Lurene Seymour. Ph.B.. B.S. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
Edith Gwinn Lenore Richards 

Margaret Marbold Marie Haltom 

Marguerite Hanford 



Gra< e Champlin 
Rachel Woolman 
Isabel Wilson 



Helen Buchen 

Edna Cryder 
Natalia Carson 

Ruth Kincaid 



Xeta Rollins 



Juniors 



Sophomores 



Grace Murray 
Freshmen 



May Babcock 
Helen Wilson 
Lisbeth Brown 



Pauline Marbold 
Katherine Ranger 
May Morgan- 
Mary Beau. Sheridan 



Alice Mi Call 



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MORGAN" GWINlS CARSON KINCAID MC CALL P. MAREOLD ROLLINS 

BUCHE.V RANGER RICHARDS CRYDER MURRAY CHAMPLN 

BABCOCK SHERIDAN H ALTON H. WILSON M. MAREOLD WOOLMAN I- WILSON 



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Active Chapters 16 Alumni Chapters 8 

IOTA CHAPTER 
Established 1911 Color — Cardinal 

Flower — Jaque Rose 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Mary Winship Kingsley Leola Ionic Goodmann 

Mrs. F. E. Ebert Frances Trost 

Mary Viola Bruner Mary Lathrop Caldwell 

Grace Belle Dallenbach 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
Katherine Mary Buenger Mabel Clare Jackson 

Anna Cathryn Hoeeert Francis Marie Rutenber 

Juniors 

Ethel Isabel Brooks Opal Trost 

Maurine Mavity Sarah Jana Wiley 

Leota Irene MosiEr Mary Etta Wills 

Louise Woodroofe 

Sophomores 

Maybelle May Dallenbach Florence Louise Moss 

Mate Lewis Giddinc.s Minnie Alice Phillips 

Eva Marie Goodmann Gladys Deforrest Saffell 

Freshmen 
Velda Bamesberger Ruth Percival 

Nellie Janes Mary Catherine Williams 

Nina LaVee Grotevant 

Pledge 

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Founded at Wesleyan College, Macon, Georgia, 1851 
Active Chapters 23 Alumni Chapters 13 

SIGMA CHAPTER 
Established at Illinois, 1912 Colors— Pale Blue and White 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Augusta Bond Lois Mu.es 

Mrs. T. J. Colvin Pauline Traube Groves 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Mrs. LeRoy Lang Mrs. H. S. Grindley 

Mrs. E. C. Hayes Mrs. Karl Ekblaw 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Alice Grace Axelson Margaret Campbell Perry 

Anne Marie Turlay 

Juniors 
Rosalie Gehant Evelyn Gehant 

Frieda Korti-i Velma Pletcher 

Amy Ward Rita Stinson 

Ruth Mussenden 

Sophomores 

Kathryn Norris Mabel Moore 

Virginia Anthony Gladys Gilpatrk k 

Agnes White Lucile Sleezer 

Gail Gaunt Zelma Jockisch 

Muriel Miles Mabel Bowman 

Freshmen 
Alice Ackert Irene Williams 

Ethel Adams Marie Beck 

Mildred Hilsabeck 






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NORRIS ANTHONY SLEEZER ACKKRT ADAMS KORTH MOORE GILPATRICK 



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Active Chapters 16 Alumni Chapters 10 



Established May, 1913 



OMICRON CHAPTER 



Colors — Light and Dark Brown 



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RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Mrs. C. M. Moss 
Mrs. W. H. Ravner 
Mrs. R. E. Heilman 
Mary Basay 
Frankie Holton 



Mrs. E. C. Schmidt 
Mrs. P. V. Jones 
Lela Brownfield 
Nina Gresham 
Margaret Dodge 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Sada Harbarger, A.M. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
Miriam Gerlach 



Irma Latzer 
Merle Harbarger 



Grace Geyer 
Laverne Burgan 
Gladys Treat 



Ruth Fox 
Winifred Supple 
( reorgia brownfield 
Margaret Baldwin 



Alida Moss 
Alma Gerlach 
Flora 1 [ottes 
Martha McCammon 



Seniors 

Carrie McColley 

Juniors 



Alice Carter 
Mary Henry 



Sophomores 



Elsie Suppls 
Freshmen 



Elsie Baechtold 
Doris Hollow ay 
Ruth Schaefer 

Mary Franklin Savage 
I Iakriette Dadant 
Ella Tillotson 
Helen Williams 



Ruth McElhiney 
[ennis Barry 

( rERTRUDE SWIFT 
Lillian foHNSTON 



Lucile Petrson 



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WILLIAMS A. GERLACH LATZER SUPPLE BROWNFIELD MOSS BAECHTOLD 

JOHNSTON BALDWIN BURGAN CARTER HENRY 



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Active Chapters 5 Colors — Sapphire Blue and White 

/ GIMEL CHAPTER 

Established 1911 Flower— Lily of the Valley 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



Bessie Cline 



Pauline Theodora Osborne 



Pearl Webber 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Emma Reed Jutton Anna Sophie Rogers 

Anna Waller Williams 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
Floy Fenton Cutler Bernice Harrison 

Seniors 
Clara Borgelt Mary Hazel Frye 

Fannie Brooks Fern Marguerite Loing 

Lenora Mary Worcester 

Juniors 

Ruth Elizabeth Allison Mary Fern Johnson 

Lola Margaret Davidson Olga Moser 

Helen Elizabeth Francis Alpha Caroline Tornouist 

Mary Rachel Hein Adeline Wood 

Sophomores 
Flora Bernice Briggs Helen M. Hollandswortii 

Dixie Howard Schumacher 

Freshmen 
Wilma Albin Mary Catherine Davidson 

Margaret A. Finley 



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Established 1907 



Flower — Narcissus 



Colors— Emerald Green and Straw Yellow 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 
Juniors 




Frances Klank 
Irene Liggett 
Laura Bardwell 
Mary Wheelhouse 
Louise Am born 
Gretchen Gooch 
Opal Trost 



Catharine Retz 
Sylvia Gibson 
Hazel Brunson 
Mary Ann Boyd 
Agnes White 
Virginia Anthony 
Hannah Harris 
Marion White 
Edna Cryder 
Ruth Kincaib 
Hortense Gettys 



Helen Fisher 
Sophomores 



May Miles 
Florence Campbell 
May Babcock 
Evelyn Gehant 
Rosalie Gehant 
Grace Geyer 
Josephine Bernhardt 



Helen Kirkpatrick 

Frances Jones 

Ella Tillotson 

Winifred Supple 

Gladys Saffle 

Mate Giddings 

Doris Roach 

Margaret Eyman 

Em 1 lie Tener 
I [azel Hulburd 
Patience Pennewill 



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Phi Lambda Upsilon, (Chemical) 

Tau Beta Pi, (Engineering) . 

Phi Delta Phi, (Law) 

Alpha Zeta, (Agriculture) 

Eta Kappa Nu, (Electrical Engineeri: 

I'm Alpha Delta, (Law) 

Delta Sigma Rho, (Oratorical) . 

Triangle, (Civil Engineering) 

Alpha Gamma Rho, (Agriculture) 

Alpha Chi Sigma, (Chemical) 

Gamma Alpha, (Scientific) . 

Scarab, ( Architectural ) 

Scabbard & Blade, (Military) 

Kappa Delta Pi, (Educational) 

Beta Gamma Sigma, (Commercial) 

Sigma Delta Chi, (Journalistic) 

Mu Kappa Alpha, (Musical) 

Alpha Kappa Psi, (Commercial) 

Sigma Tau, (Engineering) 

Alpha Delta Sigma. (Advertising) 

Alpha Rho Chi, (Architectural) 



Honorary Senior Society 



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Lambda Epstlon Phi, (Republican) 



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CHARLTON SHONLE MANUEL ZELLE MUNCIE BRADY ENGLIS 

KREMERS BARNES WICHERS EIDE TILTON SCHOLL HARDER NELSON WE1LAND 

ROSS BROWN CLARK SNOOK DUNHAM LAYNC RUBY BURTON HUISKEN 

HESS HEINZELMAN KIRKPATRICK HAHN WILDMAN MOHLMAN BRALEY SKINNER CLEVENGER LEWIS 

BALL MCFARLAND BEAL VALENTINE HOWARD SMITH OLIN KAMM BRUNSKILL 



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Active Chapters 12 
Established i88y 

S. W. Parr 
L. H. Smith 
C. G. Hopkins 

I. M. Lindgren 

II. L. Oi.in 



HONORAY CHEMICAL SOCIETY 
ALPHA CHAPTER 



Alumni Chapters 1 
Colors — Blue and Red 



J. M. 
L. V. 
G. D. 
T. R. 
J. B. 
S. E. 
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Brady 
Braley 
Brunskill 
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Clevenger 
Corson 
Clark 
Charlton 
Dunham 
Derick 
Englis 
Engle 
Eide 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

G. McP. Smith 

W. A. Noyes 

E. Bartow 
ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 

B. S. Hopkins 
H. C. P. Weber 

D. F. McFarland 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 
H. C. Eckstein 
J. W. Howard 
A. M. Heinzelman 
A. H. Huisken 
O. E. Harder 
R. W. Hess 
O. E. Heuse 
F. C. Hahn 
S. D. Kirkpatrick 
O. Kamm 



H. S. Grindle\ 
E. W. Washburn 
C. W. Balke 



H. C. Kremers 
T. E. Layng 
H. F. Lewis 
W. F. Langlier 
F. W. Muncie 
F. W. Mohlman 
D. A. MacInnes 
W. A. Manuel 



J. B. Nathanson 
R. A. Nelson 
1. B. Ruby 
E. A. Rees 
J. C. Ross 
II. A. Shonle 
G. S. Skinner 
G. W. Sears 

C. SCHOLL 

I. D. Snook 
W. J. T 1 ETON 
Lambert Thorp 

II. D. Valentine 
E. Van Alstine 
E. Wichers 

H. J. Weil'and 

E. A. WlLDMAN 

C. A. Zei le 



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Founded at Lehigh University, 1883 
Active Chapters 28 Colors— Brown and White 

ALPHA CHAPTER 

Established i8yj 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 



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E. M. Burr 


L. R. Gully 


H. F. Fost 


II. C. Marble 


II. E. Smith 


E. V. Kratz 




MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 


W. F. M. Goss 


C. R. Richards 


j. M. White 


I. O. Baker 


A. N. Talbot 


G W. PlCKELS 


C. C. Wiley 


C. R. Clark 


O. A. Leutwiler 


O. A. Randolph 


Morgan Brooks 


N. C. RlCKER 


E. B. Paine 


L. H. Provine 


H. D. Oberdorfer 


G. A. GOODENOUGH 


E. C. Schmidt 


N. B. Garver 


E. H. Waldo 


Fred B. Seely 


C. E. NOERENBERG 


R. Y. Williams 


T. A. Dent 


T. D. Yensen 


H. F. CiODEKE 


H. H. Jordan 


G P. BOOMSLITER 


A. F. Comstock 


H. F. Gonnerman 


H. H. Stoek 


A. P. Carmen 


L. E. Young 


C. T. Knipp 


T. M. Snodgrass 


P. S. Biegler 


C. R. Moore 


J. W. Davis 


W. S. Wolfe 

A. C. Callen 


M. L. Enger 



R. W. Owens 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduates 
R. B. Pogue E. A. Reid 

F. G Young M. L. Nebel 



H. E. Austin 
I. R. Cline 
B. E. Dirks 
A. K. Fogg 
F. A. Forty 
Ralph Green 
Arthur Hagener 
E. A. Tames 



Seniors 

Li xx Helaxder 
Max Holm burger 

E. S. MacPhersox 

F. A. K. Marx 
J. H. Miller 
R. L. Morrell 
G L. Kyle 

P. J. Nilsen 

C. W. Lincoln 

Junior 
E. C. 1 [amill 



R. E. Thomas 
S. T. Smith 
P. J. Sweeny 
W. H. Simon 
II. B. Rogers 
M. C. Taylor 
G W. Watts 

E. A. WlLLIFORD 



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Founded at the University of Illinois, 1904 
Active Chapters 10 Alumni Chapters 4 



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ALPHA CHAPTER 

Colors — Navy Blue and Scarlet 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 
W. T. Burnett L. R. Gully 

R. N. Fargo 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



P. S. BlEGLER 

Morgan Brooks 
J. W. Davis 
I. W. Fisk 



L. V. James 
A. R. Knight 
C. T. Knipp 
E. B. Paine 



E. H. Waldo 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Graduates 



R. W. Owens 



H. E. Bard en 
V. F. Dobbins 

F. A. Forty 
A. E. Hart 

R. L. Hermann 
E. A. James 
T. Kawamoto 

G. L. Kyle 



H. E. Dralle 
L. M. Gumm 
O. A. Lanshe 



J. L. Simonich 



E. A. Reid 



Seniors 



Juniors 



W. S. Nelson 

P. [. NlLSEN 

R. W. Parker 
A. R. Summers 
P. J. Sweeny 
E. A. Willifokd 
T. K. White 
J. E. Zollinger 



A. H. Lenz 
L. J. Rust 
R. R. Thomas 



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Active Chapters 46 



Established 1901 



Founded at Michigan University, 1869 



Alumni Chapters 16 



LANGDELL CHAPTER 

Colors — Wine and Pearl Blue 



RESIDENT 
Henry T. Colvin 
Benjamin Harrison Crowder 
Lawrence Arthur Glenn 
Charles Wallace Graham 
Benjamin Franklin Harris, Jr. 
Newton Meguire Harris 
Paul Clement Keran 
William Hamilton Lee 
Roger Frank Little 

MEMBERS IN 

0. A. Harker, LL.B., A.M. 
E. H. Decker. LL.B.. A.B. 
Frederick Green, LL.B., A.M. 

1. N. Pomeroy, Jr., LL.B., A.M. 



MEMBERS 

Evart Bruce McCormack 
William Guy Palmer 

B. E. Pinkerton 
Glenn James Pruett 
Chester William Richards 
Earnest A. Rich 

Ray Carlisle Sparks 
Francis Marion Wright 
E. C. Staley 

THE FACULTY 

W. G. Hale, LL.B., B.S. 

C. G. Vernier, A.B., J.D. 
Lew R. Sarett, A.B. 

Arthur Ray Warnock, LL.B., A.B. 



Jay Earl Miller, A.B., A.M., LL.B. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Seniors 
Benjamin Franklin Anderson James Fearon Brown 

Herbert William Bye Rodney Clifton Glover 



Nuel Dinsmore Belnap 
William Ward Hart 
Ray David Henson 
Charles Francis Hough 
Wilbur Edward Krebs 



Lloyd Bradley 

Clarence Washburn Glover 

William Rutledge Harris 



Juniors 

Carl King Rang 
John Lester Robinson 
Frank Clifton Slater 
William Erastus Wheeler, Jr 
Joe Whitnel 

Sophomores 

Robf.rt Earl Hill 
Benjamin Wham 
Groff Lawrence Woodward 



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BELNAP WHEELER KREBS HARRIS C. W. GLOVER HART HENSON 

ROBINSON BROWN BYE ANDERSON R. C. GLOVER SLATER RANG 



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HONORARY AGRICULTURAL FRATERNITY 
Founded at Ohio State University, 1897 

Colors — Mauve and I'.UicJ 

MORROW CHAPTER 
Established at University of Illinois, 1902 



MEMBERS 
Eugene Davenport 
C. F. Hottes 
S. A. Forbes 
F. H. Rankin 
C. G. Hopkins 
L. H. Smith 
J. G. Mosier 
J. E. Whitchurch 
H. W. Mumford 
Orr Allyn 
A. F. Gustafson 
W. L. Burleson 

F. A. Fisher 
H. S. Grindley 
W. J. Carmichael 

G. E. Gentle 
E. Roberts 
P. S. Barto 
I. D. Allison 

}. W. Whisenand 
J. W. Read 

MEMBERS I 



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Donald McIntosh 

D. O. Barto 
W. C. Coffey 
H. A. Harding 
H. P. Rusk 

J. C. Blair 
L. R. Lang 
[, W. Lloyd 
N. W. Hepburn 

E. E. Hoskins 
S. V. Holt 

O. S. Fisher 
H. W. Stewart 
C. O. Reed 
W. W. Yapp 
R. E. Brand 
H. A. Ruehe 
H. Fahrnkopf 
E. A. White 
J. B. Andrews 
Roy Hansen 

N THE UNIYERSITY 
Graduate 
A. Albreciit 



Seniors 



W. H. Chambers 

F. M. Bane 

E. W. Hitchcock 

R. B. Hinman 

M. E. Slater 

A. H. Grunewald 



J. T. Autkn 

E. A. Bebb 

F. Bep.b 



H. F. Cogdall 
E. C. Crawford 
R. T. Welsh 
H. C. Albin 
D. W. Dunlap 
C. H. Rehling 



W. W. Wilson 
Juniors 



E. V. Bruington 
G. Curtiss 
J. T. Mills 



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BRUINGTON DUNLAP ALBIN COGDALL HINMAN BEBB MILLS 

WILSON CRAWFORD SLATER CHAMBERS HITCHCOCK GRUNEWALU WELSH 



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PROFESSIONAL LAW FRATERNITY 

Founded at Kent College of Law, i8(jy 

Active Chapters 32 Alumni Chapters 12 

MACRUDER CHAPTER 
Established 100 / Colors— Old Gold and Purple 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Sidney Nathan Cohen, LL.B. Roscoe Clark Dillavou, A. B., J.D. 

A. P. Wright, A.M. 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Walter Fairleigh Dodd, Ph.D. George Enfield Frazer, LL.B. 

Charles E. Carpenter, M.A., LL.B. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
Charles Roy Patterson Floyd Evanston Britton 

Wesley Erett Cummins Timothy Irl McKnight 

Palmer M. Gunnell Lynn S. Corbly 

Guy E. McGaughey Guy Benjamin Reno 

Essel R. Dillavou 

Juniors 
Fred Hanford Kelly Elliott Billman 

John William Freels James Rubin Colbert 

Sophomores 
Sterling R. Cunningham Ralph G. Meyer 

Frank A. Schoembs Harry D. Albert 

Thomas F. McGowan 

freshmen 
Russel B. Leidel W. Hugh Martin 

Gerald IT. Faldf.r Roland E. Winkelmann 

Frank H. Geiler Oscar William Burgess 

Homer Kasserman George Landon 



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FALDER WINKLEMAN CUNNINGHAM MARTIN ALBERT KELLY BURGESS SCHOEMBS BILLMAN 

RENO DILLAVOU MCGAUGHEY CUMMINS PATTERSON GUNNELL CORBLY MCKNIGHT BRITTON 



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Active Chapters 4 Colors— Old Rose and Gray 

Established at University of Illinois, 1907 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Ira'Osborn Baker, D.Eng. John Pascal Brooks, M.S. 

Melvin Lorenius Enger, C.E. Arthur Newell Talbot, C.E. 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 

Robert C. Wagner, Jr. Glenn H. Stough 

Edwin H. Swenson 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Harrison Frederick Gonnermann, B.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 

Robert Edgar Turley, Jr. 

Seniors 
Irving Anderson Albert Richardson Montague 

Jack Erwin Demuth Vernon Leslie Morris 

Charles Everett Hungerford Robert Harold Olson 

Leslie Arthur Kibbe Frederick William Panhorst 

Wilfred Henry Kuhn Eugene Robert Rall 

Henry Adam Marbach Ellis Marsh Shaw 

John Dwight Mattison George Orlando With 

Roy Richard Zipprodt 

Juniors 
Richard Newell Coolidge Lerov William Ledgerwood 

John Riley Donaldson Joseph Moore McKeon 

Arthur R. Keller William Love Parish 

Arm in Martin Kircher Albert Getten Stone 

George Richard White 

Sophomores 
Edward 1'.. Erickson Charles McKinlev Ettincer 

Charles Howard Sheppard Ciiari.es Bagwell Taylor 

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COOLIDGE KELLER DONALDSON KIRCHER MORRIS LEDGERVVOOD MC KFON 

RALL MATTISON MONTAGUE TURLEY PANHORST HUNGERFORD ZIPPRODT DEMUTH 

KUHN KIBBE ANDERSON SHAW MARBACH WITH OLSON 



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PROFESSIONAL AGRICULTURAL FRATERNITY 

Founded at the University of Illinois, ipo8 

Active Chapters 9 Colors — Dartmouth Green and Old Gold 

ALPHA CHAPTER 
Established 1908 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Eugene Davenport, LL.D. Sleeter Bull, M.S. 

Fred Henry Rankin Chester Otis Reed, B.S. 

Alfred Joseph Gunderson, B.S. Joseph H. Checklev, B.S. 

Henry Perly Rusk, MS.A. Walter E. Joseph, Ph.D. 

Claude Harper, B.S. Fridel C. Riciiey 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 

Allan Barnes Rayburn Newton Anthony Wright 

Harold Edward Colson John Mitchell Griffin 

LIarry Frank Cogdall Fred Albert Healy 

Loyd Warfield Brown John Joseph Pitts, Jr. 

Joseph Conrad Lawless 



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Emin Winthrop Hawkins 
Dudley Winthrop Crane 
Alexander Paul Macdonald 
Robert Isac Terry 
Forest Bebb 

James Bruce Henderson 
William Otto Roessler 
Clifford Sherron Love 
George Rogers Clark 
James Marshall Wanzer 
Horrace Ballon Ingalls 



Arthur Edward Mealiff 
Wilbur Mills Sutherland 
Rex Carr Eaton 
Rodman Fleming Vansant 
Francis Dickerson Griffith 
John Wesley Watson 
Homer Irving Huntington 
Arthur Truman Semple 
Durbin Ralph Downey 
George Curtiss 
William LIeine Sellards 



Robert Edwin Gayle 



Christian Gross 
George Wilson Merrill 
David Burn ham Starrett 
Thomas Treston McEvoy 



Sophomores 

Frank Howard Pettybridge 
John Ward Nelson 
Walter Alexander Laing 
Carter Brown 



William Chauncey Savage 



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CLARK LAING STARRETT HENDERSON SUTHERLAND GROSS RICHEY 

PETTYBRIDGE NELSON MERRILL HAWKINS SAVAGE DOWNEY GRIFFITH MC EVOY BROWN 

L.W.BROWN WANZER EATON SELLARDS WATSON MACDONALD CURTISS BEBB PITTS 

HUNTINGTON INGALLS GAYLE CRANE TERRY VANSANT ROESSLER SEMPLE MEALIFF LOVE 

COGDALL GRIFFIN HEALY WRIGHT RAYBURN RUSK JOSEPH COLSON REED 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



JUpIja (ttlfi #t0tna 

PROFESSIONAL CHEMICAL FRATERNITY 

Founded at Wisconsin University, 1902 

Active Chapters 23 Alumni Chapters 3 

ZETA CHAPTER 
Established ipo8 Colors — Prussian Blue and Chrome Yellow 

RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Don Bissell, B.S. Oscar E. Harder, M.S. 

Bert S. Davisson, B.S. Warren Albert Ruth, A.M. 

P. M. Dean, B.S. Oscar S. Watkins, B.S. 

Arthur Decuman, B.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



1 



Edward Bartow, Ph.D. 
Henry John Broderson, Ph.D. 
B. Smith Hopkins, Ph.D. 
Walter Edward Joseph, Ph.D. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



David Ford McFarland, Ph.D. 
William A. Noves, Ph.D., LL.D. 
Samuel Wilson Parr, M.A. 
Ray Thomas Stull, E.M. 



Graduate 



Harry Peach Corson 
Wesley Wallace Han ford 
Raymond W. Hess 
Henry L. Huenink 
Axel Magnus Hjort 



Floyd William Mohlman 
John William Read 
Fred Wilber Tanner 
Ralph W. Tippet 
Henry Joseph Weiland 



Stewart Dent Marquis 
Seniors 



Arthur Jacob Benner 
Everett Robert Brunskill 
Alwin Clyde Eide 

Alfred M. Heinzelmann 

Fred Charles Haiin 
Sidney Dale Kirktatrick 
Chester William Lenzing 

W. D. Hatfield 
C. Hamilton 
C. N. Davidson 
L. G. Krug 

E. 1 



Sidney Marion Hull 
John Donald Snook 
Buford M. Stubblefield 
Arthur Herman Huisken 



Juniors 



L Boyd Lyon 

Ralph Russell Wagner 

Carl Alfred Zelle 



Pledges 

H. 
R. 
R. 
H. 


R. Lee 
W. Morgan 
Russell 

A. Wink 1.1: mann 


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ORGANIZATIONS 




Alplja (Elji Jstigma 



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LYON HUISKEN E I DE BRUNSKILL 

HAHN WAGNER KIRKPATR1CK SNOOK BENNER HEINZELMANN I~NZING STUBBLEFIELD 

BISSELL TIPPET WEILAND HJORT HANFORD REED HARDER HULL ZELLE 

MARQUIS TANNER HUENINK MC FARLAND HOPKINS CORSON DAVIDSON JOSEPH MOHLMAN HESS 



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ORGAN IZATIONS 



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BRISTOW 
II IN SHAW HELM 

EWERT STEVENS SLATER 



REESE 
WOOD LEONARD 

HIMSTEDT WHAM 



I K )N( )RARY ORATORICAL FRATERNITY 
Founded at Northwestern University 1906 

\ *■ rh^fprc .7 Colors— Maroon and Black 

Active Chapteis 3/ 

ILLINOIS CHAPTER 

Established 1906 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
Burley Frank Lamb 

Harry Thomas Wood Vernon Thompson Stevens 

Benjamin Wham 

Juniors 
LewR. Sarett Ralph EbnerHimstedt 

Joseph Howard Hinshaw Leal Wiley Keese 

Frank Clifton Slater Herbert Clarence Hbuc 

Frank Bonner Leonard George Washington Brisiow 

Donald Ashway GROSSMAN 

Sophomores 
Earl Cranston Ewert 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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WHITE SHIELDS FERGUSON BEAUBIEN HOUGH PIHLGARD JONES 

KNOEBEL RAMEY ASHBECK MC FARLAND PURDY BOYD KITTERMASTER BEHEL 

ZIMMERMANN HUBBARD DEGEN HOLI.1STFR AUSTIN WALTERS SMITH 

FL'LLER MC CUMBER TROEGER LEIBSLE SEIFREII) LEAVENS CARPENTER PATTEN 



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HONORARY ARCHITECTURAL SOCIETY 
Founded at Illinois University, igop 
KARNAK CHAPTER 
Active Chapters 2 Colors — Yale Blue 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
James McLaren White, B.S. Robert Taylor Jones, B.S. 

Newton Alonzo Wells, M.P. Angelo B. Corrubia, M.S. 

Ralph Rodney Root, M.L.A. Frank Cushing Smith, M.L.A. 

William C. Titcomb, B.S. James H. Forsythe, M.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Graduate 
Wayne I. Kirby 

Seniors 
N. P. Hollister 

W. HdRNAL 

P. E. Jones 
1 1. F. Knappenberger 
W. G. Knoebel 
A. B. Leavens 

LONGEVILLE 

L. McKeown 
L. Morris 
H. Olson 
Juniors 

A. KlTTER MASTER 

W. Leibsle 
McFarland 
McCumber 

PlHLGARD 

Ramey 



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. W. Anderson 


B. 


S. Austin, Jr. 


C. 


K. Carpenter 


c. 


B. Cochran 


w 


. Crutchfield 


G. 


C. Faurote 


C. 


M. Ferguson 


H. 


C. Fuller 


G. 


T. Gill 


A. 


B. Hammitt 


W 


L. Ashiseck 


W 


P. Beauiuen 


V. 


H. Behel 


L. 


B. Boyd 


A. 


G. Degen 


W 


H. Hough 


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W. Hubbard 



T. 
T. 
V. 
R. 



D. 
R. 
R. 
C. 
E. 
F. 



B. 
W. 
F. 
W. 



N. 


B. Patten 


A. 


P. Peyraud 


L. 


C. Pinault 


R. 


H. Purdy 


E. 


M. Shaw 


T- 


P. Shields 


W 


. M. Siemens 


11. 


H. Walters 


II. 


E. Webber 


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Wyman 


H. 


T. Rogers 


A. 


G. Seifreid 


H. 


A. Smith 


P. 


T. Troeger 


G. 


R. White 


A. 


C. ZlM MERMAN N 



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C. Peterson 

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HONORARY MILITARY SOCIETY 
Founded at Wisconsin University, 1902 Active Companies 10 



COMPANY "F" 



Established lyocj 



Colors — Red, White, and Blue 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Major J. F. Brown Captain C. C. Jones 

Captain E. K. Augustus Captain M. L. Nebel 

Captain E. A. Doisy Lieutenant E. J. Potter 

Captain L. W. Faulkner 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Major F. D. Webster, U. S. A. 
Sergeant F. W. Post, U. S. A. 
(retired) 



Major W. J. Carmichael 
Captain R. N. Fargo 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Colonel J. N. Greene 

Lieutenant- 
Lieutenant- 
Major E. C. Elles 
Major L C. Hostetler, Jr. 
Major E. H. Pool 
Major C. F. Hood 
Major L. D. Knapp 
Captain G. D. Stopp 
Captain R. L. Hermann 
Captain L. E. Thorne 
Captain G. H. Butler 



Captain A. M. Baker, Jr. 

Colonel A. H. Grunewald 

Colonel W. C. Armstrong 

Captain L. C. Bow 
Captain B. H. Decker 
Captain L. H. Dunham 
Captain M. E. Hoit 
Captain A. H. Huisken 
Captain C. A. Nebel 
Captain Roe Niver 
Captain M. E. Slater 
Captain R. R. Zipprodt 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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BUTLER SLATER ELLES HOSTETLER NIVER STOPP 

BAKER HERMANN ZIPPRODT HUISKEN DUNHAM HOIT THORNE 

NEBEL POOL KNAPP GRUNEWALD WEBSTER GREENE BOW ARMSTRONG HOOD 



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GRADUATE SCIENTIFIC FRATERNITY 
founded at Cornell University, 1899 Colors — Gold and Black 

ILLINOIS CHAPTER 

Established 1909 
RESIDENT MEMBERS 
George D. Beal A. D. MacGillivray 

Wilber J. Carmichael George L. Peltier 

Ira W. Dickerson Chester O. Reed 

K. ]. T. Ekblaw Frank W. Reed 

Nelson W. Hepburn G. McPail Smith 



I 



Ralph K. 1 [ursh 






Louie 11. Smith 


Lloyd T. Jones 






I [arley J. Van Cleave 




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O. 


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ACTIVE MEMBERS 


T. R. Ball 






R. S. Hulce 


P. L. Baylev 






L. V. James 


R. L. BORGER 






S. Karrer 


S. A. Braley 






A. P. Kratz 


A. M. Brunson 






E. M. R. Lam key 


E. E. Charleton 






T. E. Laying 


K. A. Clark 






R. H. Linkins 


J. L. Con el 






D. A. MacInnes 


"). W. Davis 






H. E. Metcalf 


\V. W. Denton 






F. W. Muncie 


E. A. Doisy 






H. L. Olin 


D. T. Englis 






A. Peterson 


I. E. Howard 






C. C. Rees 


C. F. Hill 






E. Roberts 


M. M. Wells 






G. W. Smith 






CHA] 


Cornell 






Illinois 


Johns Hopkins 




Wisconsin 


Dartmouth 






Michigan 


Chicago 






Missouri 




444 



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KIRKPATRICK PENDARVIS IRWIN SEIDENBERG 

BARLOW MORRISSEY VAN DOREN WILLIAMS NOBLE 



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PROFESSIONAL JOURNALISTIC FRATERNITY 
Founded at DePauw University, 1909 
Active Chapters 15 Colors— Black and White 

LAMBDA CHAPTER 
Established 1912 

RESIDENT MEMBER 
Carl Stevens 

MEMBER IN THE FACULTY 
Franklin William Scott, Ph.D. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduates 

Mark Albert VanDoren, A.B. 

Seniors 
Ralph Linden Barlow Nathan Cook Seidenberg 

Edward Henry Morrissev Wilbur Otis Pendarvis 

Stanley Pieffer Irvin 

Juniors 
Sidney Dale Kirkpatrick Joseph Morgan Noble 

Fenton Hamilton Williams 



445 




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ORGANIZATIONS 



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PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTURAL FRATERNITY 
Founded at the University of Illinois and University of Michigan, 1914 

ANTHEMIOS CHAPTER 

Active Chapters 2 Colors — Maroon and Navy Blue 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Nathan Clifford RicKER.Dr.Arch. Clarence Howard Blackall, M.S. 
Loring Harvey Provine, B.S. Norman Foote Marsh, M.S. 

Allen Holmes Kimball, M.S. George Wesley Bullard, M.S. 

MEMBER IN THE FACULTY 
William Sidney Wolfe, B.S. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
Arthur Edward Benson Fred Grafton Rounds 

Edward Franz Knemeyer Charles Laurence Ritts 

Juniors 
John Solomon Bartley Joseph Julian Patterson 

Clinton Harriman Cowgill Fred Andrew Rohn 

Francis Ellsworth Dunlap Truman Jefferson Strong 

Ray Lewis Jordan Thomas Sheridan Tanner 

Glenn Herbert Thomas 

Sophomores 
Lester Howard Christen Harrison George Overend 

Pledges 
Edgar Irving Kober Louis Noire' Crawford 

Ross Henry Thiele 



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KOBER ROHN STRONG 

CHRISTEN COWGILL THOMAS JORDAN DUNLAP PATTERSON 

BARTLEY ROUNDS KNEMEYER BENSON RITTS OVERAND TANNER 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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HONORARY SENIOR SOCIETY 

Founded at the University of Illinois, ipi- 
ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Frank Milton Bane 

Ralph Dwyer Chapman 

Harry Frank Cogdall 

Clarence Milford Ferguson 

Joseph Nathaniel Greene 

Andrew Baker Hammitt 

Joseph Colombus Hostetler 

Helmuth Julius Kircher 

Peter Jacob Nilsen 

Arthur Allen Odell 

Allan Barnes Rayburn 

Orlie Rue 

Eugene Schobinger 

Nathan Cook Seidenberg 

Ray Iris Shawl 

Russell Claude Swope 

Leon Deming Tilton 

Alexander Wagner 

Harry Elliot Webber 

Fred Sheaf Wells 

Benjamin Wham 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




WOLFE MORRISSON PURSLEY 

WARD CARTER CHAMPLAIN BROOKS RUTENBER KEEN 

RICHARDSON EDGAR LA FRENZ LAWSON LOING RINAKER 

f l|i Pdta f si 

SENIOR-JUNIOR HONORARY SOCIETY 
Established tqoo 



Colors — Green and Gold 



Flower — English Violet 



RESIDENT MEMBERS 
Esther Maxwell Pauline Osborne 

JAENETTE STEDMAN FLORENCE ANDERSON 

Ethel Forbs Scott Lois Green Guiid 

Elizabeth Burr Kelso Mary Mann Hepburn 

Gertrude Gonnerman Frances Rayner 

Bertha Jones Ethel Little 

Bertha Goll p EARL Mulliken 

Frankie Holton 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Elizabeth Bryan Verna Brooks 

Sabra E. Stevens 



Amelia Gay 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 

Madge Myers 
Miriam Knowlton 



Lenora Richards 
Mary Lawson 
Grace La Frenz 
Viola Wolfe 
Helen Morrison 
Emma Pursley 
Fannie Brooks 
Frances Keen 



Seniors 

Marie Rutenber 
Grace Champlain 
Juanita Richardson 
Dorothy Rinaker 
Mamie Ward 
Edith Edgar 
Helen Madden 
Alice Carter 
Fern Loing 



449 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



1 




BROWN JONES BRADLEY EMMOND 

MURRAY POGUE MCCRACKEN MTLLER MC ELVEEN 

GRF.ISON R. SCHIESSWOHL MORRISSEY WAGNER TALBERT 

JENSON ARMOUR CHAPMAN P. SCHIESSWOHL POSTEL 



BUSCH 

RICHMOND 
GRAVES SWOPE 



^Iplja fiappa f si 



PROFESSIONAL COMMERCIAL FRATERNITY 



Founded at New York University, 1905 



Active Chapters 9 



Established 1912 



Flower — Chrysanthemum 



EPSILON CHAPTER 



Colors — Blue and Gold 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

David Kinley Nathan A. Weston 

Maurice Robinson G. E. Fraser 

Hiram Scoville Ralph E. Heilman 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



Seniors 



Philip F. Armour 
Ralph D. Chapman 
Perry H. Graves 
Milton Jenson 
Edward H. Morrissey 
Frank A. Bush 



Oscar J. Murray 
Harold A. Pogue 
Roger B. Bronson 
John T. Bradley 
J. Russell Jones 
Wendell K. McCracken 



Juniors 



F. W. Postel 
P. G. Schiesswohl 
Russell C. Swope 
Alexander Wagner 
George K. Richmond 
Harold A. Talisert 

Wyatt G. Emmond 
Hans P. Grieson 
Elliott S. Miller 
Rea Brown 
Ralph Schiesswohl 
W. T. McElveen 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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DILLAVOU BIGLER MC MILLEN 

ELLES SWOPE 

CUM MINGS POSTEI. GAMBLE 

HONORARY COMMERCIAL FRATERNITY 

ILLINOIS CHAPTER 

Established, February, 1912 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



M. H. Robinson, Ph.D. 
Hon. E. J. James, Ph.D. 



Dean David Kinley, Ph.D. 
N. A. Weston, Ph.D. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 

Charles Leslie Stewart 

Seniors 



Harry Edward Bigler 
Harold Lane Cummings 
Essel Ray Dillavou 
Edward Charles Elles 



Clair Curtis Gamble 
Frederick William Postel 
George Bukr McMillen 
Russell Claude Swope 



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VANSANT GREEN BARRON 

PERRY BUTLER HAGGOTT DOBBINS ARMSTRONG 

SILKMAN WELLS AUSTIN HOOD STEWART 



CHARTRANII 



RUE 

WILLIFORI) 



#i0ma %wx 



HONORARY ENGINEERING FRATERNITY 

Founded at Nebraska, 1904 

Active Chapters 8 Colors— Blue and White 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

C. R. Richards A. B. McDaniels 

P. S. BlFX.LER 

Graduate School 

W. A. Gatward 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 



H. E. Austin 
L. F. Armstrong 
A. F. Barron 
J. B. Chartrand 
V. F. Dobihns 
M. S. Dutton 
R. Green 
W. S. Haggott 
C. F. Hood 



G. H. Butler 
T. D. Randall 

0. Rue 

1. M. Silkman 
R. E. Thomas 
W. L. Vansant 
F. S. Wells 

F. A. WlLLIKORD 

E. II. Stewart 
R. G. Perry 



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MCCRACKEN KREBS MEEK SUTHERLAND 

.SHELBY CREBS SEARLES LAWNIN CLARK CRANE JUNGKUNZ HOUGH 

REGAN SWANSON BEAL .. POGUE SCHLUETER BLOCK NORLIN 



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Established 1906 



%\x Plttx Plan 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Color — Black 



Delta Pan Delta 

Leroy Oliver Grieser 
Sigma Chi 

Nelson Lawn in 
Kapf>a Sigma 

Ralph Arthur Swanson 
Phi Kappa Sigma 

Willis Francis Slayton 
Phi Delta Thcta 

Wilbur Meek 
Alpha Tau Omega 

Harold Austin Pogue 
Phi Gamma Delta 

Wilbor Sutherland 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Louis F. Jungkunz 
Beta Theta Pi 

John P. Crebs 
Sigma Nu 

Maurice Edwin Regan 
Chi Phi 



Phi Kapp<a Psi 

WendellKempMcCracken 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 

Walter Hubert Beal 
Delta Upsilon 

George Clark 
Theta Delta Chi 

Fred Christopher Norlin 
Zcta Psi 

Edwin Shelby, Jr. 
Phi Sigma Kappa 

W. L. Schlueter 
Psi Upsilon 

Dudley Wilbur Crane 
Alpha Delta Phi 

Donald Kenneth Searles 
Chi Psi 

Walden Henry Hough 
Alpha Sigma Phi 

Wilbur Edward Krehs 



Edward Stevens Block 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



1 



Helmet Club 



I 



Established 1907 



Colors — Blue and White 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Delta Tau Delta 

George W. Stoddard 
Frank M. Judson 

Sigma Chi 

Charles A. Flannery 
Howard R. Walton 

Kappa Sigma 

Edward F. Stephenson 
Herbert C. Tiffany 

Phi Kappa Sigma 

Wallis J. Evans 
Carl E. Johnson 

Phi Delta Theta 

Raymond L. Grantz 
Stephen M. Birch 

Alpha Tau Omega 

John H. Powers 
Thomas S. Browning 

Phi Gamma Delta 

John H. Kasbeer 
Edwin T. Colton 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

John G. E. Kipp 
Clyde H. Bergston 

Beta Theta Pi 

William O. Nelson 
Will E. Niven 

Sigma Nn 

Robert H. Humphreys 
Roland G. Roberts 

Irving 1 
Harold 



Phi Kappa Psi 

Franklin B. Macomber 

Walter A. Laing 
Delta Kappa Epsilon 

George S. Smith 

Frank H. Pethybridge 
Delta Upsilon 

Byrd H. Harrod 

Waldo B. Ames 
Theta Delta Chi 

Norman J. Mallet 

Milton G. Silver 
Zeta Psi 

Elton T. Mackte 

Elmer C. Dewey 
Phi Sigma Kappa 

Frank A. Logan 

Charles H. Ruedi 
Psi Upsilon 

Charles R. Gross 

Richard B. Foster 
Alpha Delta Phi 

Henry W. Markwasdt 

Edwin G. Roos 
Chi Psi 

Clarence W. Reuling 

Robert A. Perry 
Alpha Sigma Phi 

Ward J. Flock 

Clarence A. Willmarth 



Chi Phi 

3. Countryman 
Woody att 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



■!■* 



Helmet Oriulr 



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BURGSTON WALTON BROWNING NIVEN MACKIE WOODYATT 

LAING KASBEER JOHNSON SILVER MALLET AMES FLANNERY 

FOSTER ROOS LOGAN DEWEY RUELING FLOCK WILLMARTH HARROD 

GROSS PETHYBRIDGE MACOMBER EVANS STODDARD GRANTZ MARKWARDT NELSON KIPP 

SMITH POWERS STEPHENSON ROBERTS RUEDI COLTON COUNTRYMAN HUMPHREYS JUDSON 



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P.G.RAPP 



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WILLIAMS SACKRISOX CRANE BILLMAX SELLARDS 

BLOCK HIMSTEDT BRADLEY CARR HAGAX GEORGE 

BURNS CREBS SCOTT HART EMMOND 

PATTERSON' MORRISSEY CKEIGHTON 



HALBURGE 

VANSANT 
MIXER MCGAUGHEY 



PITTS 



J. H. RAPP 



Founded 1913 



QLomitatus 

HONORARY DEMOCRATIC FRATERNITY 

Colors — Blue and Grey 



Seniors 



J. H. Rapp 

W. L. Vans ant 

j. J. Pitts 

E. H. MORRISSEY 

G. E. McGaughey 



}. T. Bradley 

D. W. Crane 
W. W. Hart 

E. S. Block 
R. A. Scott 

E. BlLLMAN 

W. G. Emm ox i) 
T. Whitnel 



Roy Patterson 
E. W. Creighton 
]. A. Sackrison 
L. G. George 
T. M. Heath 



W. H. Sellards 



Juniors 



P. G. Rait 

R. E. Himstedt 

V. C NORLIN 

F. H. Williams 
1. P. Crebs 
'( ). M. Burns 
C M. Halburge 
V. W. Cakk 



T. A. Hagan 






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! SI I I trims SC 

ORGANIZATIONS 



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SHONTS 


CHAPMAN 


FREELS 




BARLOW 


RHEA 


ODELL 


ANDREWS 


SCHLUETER 


JGH 


KELLEY 


AYRES 


HUSBAND 


BELNAP 



^Eamltia 2q&iUm |JI)i 



HONORARY REPUBLICAN FRATERNITY 



Founded 1914 



Seniors 
R. M. Husband 

C. J. Rhea 

T. D. Shonts 

R. L. Barlow 

R. D. Chapman 

A. A. O'Dell 
N. C. Seidenberg 

Juniors 
N. D. Belnap 
J. W. Freels 
F. H. Kelly 
L. G. Ayres 
C. F. Hough 

W. T. SCHLUETER 

R. C. Andrews 



Colors — Black and Gold 



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SACKRISON DE MUTH KIRCHER LUMLEY MC JOHNSON MILLS BROWN 
BURTON BABCOCK BIGLER WEBER FRIER BRONSON CURTISS 



TUDSON 



PIHLGAED 



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Founded at the University of Missouri, 1913 

HONORARY JOURNALISTIC FRATERNITY 

Devoted to Practical Advertising 

ILLINOIS CHAPTER 

Established March 24, 1914 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Harrison McJohnson 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 



H. E. BlGLER 


F. S. Wells 
Juniors 


J. A. Sackrison 


R. B. Bronson 




H. H. Almond 


I. E. DeMutii 




I. B. Pagin 


H. E. Weber 




11. P. Greison 


A. M. Kircher 




J. Frier 


K. G. Brown 




George Curtiss 


E. F. PlHLGARD 


J. T. Mills 
Sophomores 


L. R. Lumley 


F. H. Babcock 




W. 11. KUHN 


R. A. Burton 


F. JlIDSON 


E. T. Colton 



458 



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SMOOT RUEHE 

STIPP ROESNER 

BROWN PERCIVAL DUBOIS DOHERTY CHRISTY 

MACBETH DEXTER MADDEN 

HONORARY MUSICAL SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY 

OF ILLINOIS 

Established 1913 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 



Pembroke 11. Brown 
( Ilen Christy 
Margaret I. Doherty 
Grace Macbeth 



I [elen L. Madden 
I [edwig E. Roesner 
Elizabeth M. Smoot 
Blanch Stipp 



Lenore DuBois 



Ltjla B. Dexter, A.B. 

Juniors 

Stella R. Percival 
Mabel L. Rtjehe 



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SCOTT DILLAVOU RENO KIRK MC GAUGHEY PENDARVIS WEBBER 



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HONORARY LAW SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

Hadden S. Kirk President 

Philip H. Everhart Vice President 

Guv E. McGaughey Secretary 

Essel R. Dillavou Treasurer 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Essel R. Dillavou William B. Jarvis, Jr. 

Philip H. Everhart Guv B. Reno 

Lester G. George W. P. Harris 

Hadden S. Kirk Edward S. Scott 

Guy E. McGaughey Albert G. Webber 

Wilbur O. Pendarvis Benjamin Wham 

Ernest II. Pool Vernon T. Stevens 



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DIETZER 
SCHWANK 



BOGGESS 

DOLE RI II) 



GOSSETT GIBSON RICHARDS 

CARTER NEWBURN RUTENBER 

MORRISON ALBAND RINAKER LATZER COLLOM BERNHARDT MC COLLEY 



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HONORARY HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE SOCIETY 

Founded at Michigan Agricultural College, ipi2 

Active Chapters 6 CoLORS-Pink and Lavender 

Flower — Sweet Pea 
EPSILON CHAPTER 
Established ipi4 
MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Professor Isabel Bevier Dr. Nellie E. Goldthwaite 

Grace Stevens 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
Naomi Newburn 



Laura Alband 
Pearl Bernhardt 
Edith Boggess 
Alice Carter 
Elizabeth Collom 
Alice Dietzer 
Ethel Dole 
Mable Gibson 



Seniors 

( )ple Gossett 
Irma Latzer 
Carrie McColley 
Helen Morrison 
Gratia Reed 
Lenore Richards 
Dorothy Rinaker 
Marie Rutenber 
Edith Swank 



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Established March 7, 1914 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Percy Ash, B.S., C.E. 
William Foster, B.S., M.S. 



Ralph Edward Muehlman, B.S. 
Samuel Chatwood Burton, A.M. 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



M. McDonald Lovell 
LeRoy Bradley 
Charles Barr Rowe 
Anker S. Graven 
James Bernard Carroll 
Donald Allen Hamilton 
Kenneth Buchanan 
John Warren Teasdale 
James Hotchkiss Ticknor 
Chester Albert Williams 
Tom Brown 
Herman Robert Jobst 
John H. Fleming 
Russell Leamer McKown 

Curt Cari 



Edwin George Roos 
Joseph Oscar Schmitz 
John H. Kasbeer 
Walter Stephen Frazier 
John Harold Heindel 
Charles Henry Ruedi 
Chester Charles Woodburn 
Warren Badger Ewer 
Paul Donald Amsbary 
Herbert Edward Mueller 
Carl Oscar Mueller 
Dan Babcock 
Byrd Henry Harrod 
George Wellington Stoddard 
Lundeen 



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ROWE WOODBURN FLEMING GRAVEN SCHMITZ STODDARD 

TEASDALE BABCOCK C.O.MUELLER WILLIAMS HEINDEL RUEDI BROWN 

HAMILTON ROOS BUCHANAN LOVELL H. E. MUELLER AMSBARY FRAZIER TICKNOR 




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GUNKEL LOVKLL DR. COEN JONES FOSTER 

ARMSTRONG BURGSTON FAULKNER LIDSTER FISHER BILLMAN 

BUCHER BARNES KIRK HILLS CLOVER BLAKE RHEA 



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Founded at Ohio State University, 1910 

Established 1914 Active Chapters 5 

ORANGE CHAPTER 

HONORARY MEMBER 

Dr. C. M. Coen 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Graduates 



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Strong 

Bucher 
Barnes 
Kirk 

GUNKEL 



Hamii.i. 

LOVELL 

Jones 



Seniors 



Rhea 

Juniors 

LlDSTER 

Sophomore 
Fisher 

Pledges 



Faulkner 

Hills 

Clover 

Blake 

Billman 



Foster 

Armstrong 

Burgston 



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ORGANIZATIONS 

NAME PAGE 

Officers of Senior and Junior Illinae 4 6 7 

Woman's League 468-469 

Illinois Students Union 47°-47 J 

Philomathean Literary Society 47 2_ 473 

Alethanai Literary Society 474~475 

Athenian Literary Society 476-477 

Illiola Literary Society 478 

Ionian Literary Society 479 

Adelphic Literary Society 480-481 

Jamesonian Literary Society 482 

Gregorian Literary Society 483 

Illini Motorcycle Club 4 8 4 

Scribblers Club 485 

Centro Literio Espanol 486 

Household Science Club 4 8 7 

Ag Club 488-489 

Chemical Club 49°-49i 

Commercial Club 49 2 

Railway Club r 493 

Civil Engineering Club 494-495 

Electrical Engineering Society 49^-497 

Mechanical Engineering Society 498-499 

Architectural Club 5°° 

Mining Society 5 OT 

Ceramics Club 5° 2 

Keramos 5°3 

Egyptian Club 5°4 

Menorah Society 5°5 

Shomeez Club 5°6 

North Atlantic Club 5°7 

Latin American Club 5°8 

Der Deutsche Verein 5°9 

Ben Franklin Club 5 IQ 

Congregational Guild 5 11 

Y. M. C. A 5 1 2 

Y. W. C. A 5 1 3 

Students Volunteer Band 5 T 4 

Bethany Circle 5 J 4 

Le Cercle Francais 5 X 5 

Hoof and Horn Club 5*6 

Country Li f e Club 5 I 7 

Sachem 5 J 8 

Loyante 5 J 9 

College Dancing Club 5 2 ° 

Orange and Blue Dancing Club 5 21 

Crystal Dancing Club 5 22 

Graphomen 5 2 3 

Dixie Club 5 2 4 

I 466 L 




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LAWSON ™>mm ^— PULLEY 

WOLFE ^ DDI 

OFFICERS 

Mary Lawson President Helen Morrison Vice-President 

Viola Wolfe Secretary Emma Pursley Treasurer 

Lucretia Cressy Sergeant-at-Arms 



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Grace Mitchell President Frances Klank Vice-President 

May Baiscock Secretary Helen Fisher _ Treasurer 

Bess East Sergeant-at-Arms 



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RU1ENBER RINAKER SEAMAN TOWSON 



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OFFICERS 

Lenore Richards President 

Ruth Robbins Vice-President 

Gretchen Gooch Secretary 

Irene Liggett Treasurer 

ADVISORY BOARD 

Lenore Richards Winifred McClure 

Ruth Robbins Hester Allyn 

Gretchen Gooch Grace Mitchell 

[rene Liggett Gladys Moss 

Madge Myers Edna Cryder 

Helen Madden Mae Mills 

Susan Benson Maurine Mavity 

Lucile Carter Erma Goldschmidi 



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GLADYS MOSS PEARL BERNHARDT 

RUTH ROBUINS LEONORE RICHARDS 



GRETCHEN GOOCH 



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Lenoee Richards 
Ruth Robbins 
Gretchen Gooch 



Doris Hallow ay 
Katherine Hitt 
Helen Johnson 
Edith Edgar 
Carrie McColley 
Grace Alexander 
Mamie Ward 
Mary Henry 
Maude Bull 




Irene Liggett 
Gladys Moss 
Pearl Bernhardt 
Marguerite Bennett 

ADVISORY BOARD 

(Continued) 

Marguerite Bennett 
Harriet Barto 
Josephine Dodds 
Marian White 
Pearl Bernhardt 
Rachel Myers 
Leone Merritt 
Josephine Bernhardt 
Adelaid Sanford 



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Illinois Vinton 



OFFICERS 

Arthur Allan Odki.i President 

E'dgar Allan Williford Vice-President 

Alden Knowlton Fogg Secretary 

Friderick William Postel Treasurer 



VICE-PRESIDENTS OF COLLEGES 

Harry Edwin Webber Engineering 

Waiter Clark Armstrong ...._..., Agriculture 

Ernest Howard Pool Liberal Arts and Sciences 

Fred Alan DuHadway L aw 



MEMBERS OF THE JUNIOR COUNCIL 

Wendell Kemp McCracken John Powell Krebs 

Waldo Lauff Schlueter Oral Albert Lansciie 

John William Freels Eugene Frances Pruett 

Edward Stevenson Block 






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"Come Up Higher" 

Founded March /, ^ CoLORS-Crimson and White 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 
Joseph Howard Hinsiiaw Frederick Curtis Swanson 

Alfred Chester Hanford 

Seniors 
Pembroke H. Brown Edwin Whitaker Mattoon 

Charles Prior Winters Wilbur Otis Pendarvis 

Glen Christy Walter Blaine Felger 

Nathan Cook Seidenberg 

Juniors 

Raymond Edward Denz Robert Herman Klamt 

Elmore George Ernst Lester John Ludwig 

John William Freels Leslie Robert Lumley 

Hans P. Greison Leo Gay McAfee 

Ralph Ebner Himstedt William Whiting Gridley 

Elmo Paul Hohman Leal Wiley Reese 

Homer S. Huntington Ralph Wendell Schecter 

Shirley Edward Scott 

Sophomores 
Earl Cranston Ewert Anthony Ready Gould 

Robert Henry Engle Paul Peter Kiessig 

Karl Epstein Percy Wright Ott 

Arthur Abbott Gilbert Charles Shattuck Palmer 

Michael Joseph Faletti Tiiaddeus L. Montgomery 

Clarence W. Smith 

Freslimcn 
Phillip W. Carbaugh Ciiaki.es Gerard Howard 

Edward Bean Hayes Nelson E. Sheldon 



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HOWARD MONTGOMERY CARBAUGH FELGER GOULD FELETTI 

ENGLE HOHMAN KLAMT LUDWIG HAYES GILBERT REESE 

KIESSIG HIMSTEDT EWERT LUMLEY DENZ EPSTEIN ERNST GREISON 

CHRISTY SCOTT SCHECTER MATTOON WINTERS BROWN PENDARVIS HINSHAW 



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Founded at the University of Illinois, iS/i 

Active Societies 2 Colors — Yellow and White 

OFFICERS 

Ruth Robbins President 

Mildred Griffith Vice-President 

Frances Marks Recording Secretary 

Mary Ann Boyd Corresponding Secretary 

Mae Mc Adam s Treasurer 

Doris Holloway Historian 

Mildred Griffith Trustee 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 

Martha Kyle Sada Annis Harbargek 

Margaret Herdman Elizabeth Bryan 

Marion Sparks 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Seniors 
Alice Carter Ruth Robbins 

Beatrice Copley Mildred Griffith 

Juniors 

Harriet Barto Frances Marks 

Irene Liggett Kate Lackey 

Doris Holloway Mae Sexauer 

Lucile Needham Helen Fisher 

Dorothy Hormel Richardine Woolman 

Mary Wills Olive Hormel 
Mildred Drew 

Sophomores 

Hester Ann Allyn Marjorie Hathorne 

Maude Marks Elizabeth Hackley 

Mary Ann Boyd Margaret Barto 

Leone Merritt Helen Kirkpatrick 

Ruth Kincaid Rayna Simons 

Special 

Mae Mc Adams 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



Mttiftnm IjliUmtv ^atittv 




H. BARTO MC ADAMS F.MARKS SIMONS 

HOLLOWAY BOYD M. MARKS M. BARTO HATHORNE ALLYN FISHER 

NEEDHAM KIRKPATRICK VVOOLMAN DREW D. HORMEL LACKEY HACKLEY MERR1TT 

LIGGETT SEXAUER ROBBINS COPLEY CARTER GRIFFITH O. HORMEL 



475 



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^iljcntett pterarg ^atuhr 



Colors — Green and Gold 

OFFICERS 

Mamie Ward President 

] ren E ( )ijn Vice-President 

Fern Loing Recording Secretary 

IrmeHouser Treasurer 

Lois Philbrick Corresponding Secretary 

Madge Myers Cntlc 

Fay Swartz Sergeant-at-Arms 

Nellie Bartels Press Reporter 

Edith Edgar Historian 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Mrs. E. C. Baldwin 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Ruth Kelso Florence Harrison 

Myrtle Renz Margaret Hutchins 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 
Helen Webber Mary Craigmile 

Lulu Dexter 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduate 

Madge Myers 

Seniors 

Irene Olin Edith Edgar 

Lillian Guffin Marie Rutenber 

Helen Madden Alta Green 

Mamie Ward Fern Loing 

Juniors 

Irma Houser Stella Percival 

Fern Johnson Opal Trost 

Grace Madden Lelia Watson 

Leota Mosier Gertrude Weber 

Nellie Bartels Mary Wheelhouse 

Sophomores 

Lois Philbrick Fay Swartz 

Mary Savage Virginia Anthony 

Freshmen 

Helen Gabel Amanda Kaar 
Martha Davis 



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SAVAGE G. MADDEN TROST WHEELHOUSE ANTHONY PERCIVAL 

HOSIER JOHNSON WEBER SWARTZ WATSON BARTELS HOUSER 

EDGAR LOING GREEN WARD GUFFIN H. MADDEN RUTENBER OLIN 



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LEE GOOCH PATTERSON ALLARD BREITSTADT 

KING HIRTH CASTLEBERRY WHIPPLE EAST BARDWELL GEYER JAMES 

ALLARD BREIDSTADT WHITCHURCH KELLOGG HOSFORD BAECHTOLD KENDALL 

HUNT ALEXANDER GOEBEL ALBAND BROOKS DAWSON MILLER PURSLEY 

IfUixjk fftterarg $mfaty 

OFFICERS 

Irma Goebel President 

Gretchen Gooch Vice-President 

Helen Whipple Recording Secretary 

Nelle Patterson Corresponding Secretary 

Vivian King Treasurer 

Helen Clark Critic 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Josie B. Houchens Georgia Fleming 

Rosalie Paar Ethel Bond 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Graduates 
Nellie Roberts Katherine McGraw Elsie Baechtold 

Seniors 
Fannie Brooks Irma Goebel Helen Whitchurch 

Laura Alband Helen Clark Helen Dawson 

Florence Hunt Amelia Kellogg Emma Pursley 

Grace Alexander 

Juniors 
Laura Bardwell Nelle Patterson Grace Mitchell 

Emma Breitstadt Laura Hirth Helen Whipple 

Bess East Gretchen Gooch Lena Lee 

Grace Geyer Vivian King 

Sophomores 
Hazel Allard Georgia Castleberry Lillian Kendall 

Maurine Allard Minnie IIaek Susan Hoseord 

FlULDA BREIDSTADT HARRIET JAMES 

478 

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HAMILL BOYE JOHNSON MILLAR BEATTY 

EPP1NGER DARRELL D.E.MILLER ELSTON FITES 

J. H. RAPP HERMAN STROHEKER RENO 



DODGE 
J. H. MILLER 



BOOTH CLEMENTS 

MORGAN SCHALLER 

HOOD BAKER 



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N. L. Partridge 
C. E. Holley 
J. H. Checkley 
O. R. Clements 
A. C. Strong 

R. L. Herman 
C. F. Hood 
J. H. Miller 
G. B. Reno 



W. F. Boye 
H. W. Dodge 
D. A. Grossman 
R. Grossman 
M. C. Johnson 
O. A. Lansche 
R. W. Millar 
T. S. Morgan 

H. B. Fites 
G. E. Potter 



HONORARY MEMBERS 



Seniors 



Leo W. Elston 



W. J. Carmichael 
B. L. Kirk 
L. E. Frailey 
F. E. Britton 
J. R. Colbert 

F. S. Stroheker 
A. M. Baker 
J. F. Hedgecock 
J. H. Rapp 



Juniors 



Sophomores 



N. McKinney 

Freshman 

W. R. Caldwell 



P. G. Rapp 

D. E. Miller 

E. C. Hamill 

E. F. PlHLGARD 

E. C. O. Beatty 
J. Eppinger 
g. s. schaller 
Lyman Booth 

G. R. Darrell 
L. H. Tuttle 



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HONORARY MEMBERS 



E. Davenport 



J. F. Brown 

C. K. Rang 

F. B. Leonard, Jr. 

R. B. Hinman 

P. J. NlLSEN 

E. U. Rugg 
H. T. Wood 

P. H. EVERHART 

E. F. Gehrig 

J. H. Gage 

C. W. Bristow 

D. W. Burgoon 

E. A. Bebb 

B. A. Hedges 
V. C. Long 
R. L. Rush 

C. J. North 

F. M. Van Natter 

C. R. Gideon 

W. W. McLaughlin 

J. H. Armstrong 

E. G. Taylor 
C. Fairman 

F. H. Miller 
O. M. Clem 
H. R. Freark 



Graduate 



Seniors 



Juniors 



Sophomores 



Freshmen 



L. R. Sarett 

F. C. Slater 

E. Roberts 

F. Sutherland 

A. O. Fraser 

E. U. Hitchcock 

B. Wham 

E. Claar 

R. W. Ritchey 

A. R. SlEBENS 

J. M. McKeon 
H. C. Helm 

G. A. Wrisley 

F. R. Miller 
P. W. Freark 

G. R. White 
D. T. Fleming 
J. T. Auten 
A. T. Fishman 

M. Taylor 
H. W. Corke 
P. H. Heineke 

T. Prison 
W. M. Hinman 
H. A. Millman 
C. E. Fraser 
W. A. Grossman 



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GAGE BURGOON P.FREARK FAIRMAN MCLAUGHLIN SIEBENS MILLER VAN NATTER LEONARD FRISON HELM 
BRISTOW HINMAN GROSSMAN AUTEN CORKE EVERHART WHAM FISHMAN A.FRASER M.TAYLOR 

MC KEON BEBB MILLMAN 

RITCHEY RUGG HEDGES HITCHCOCK NILSEN WRISLEY NORTH LONG 

C. FRASER WHITE HEINEKE RUSH CLEM FLEMMING E.TAYLOR H. FREARK 



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HOWELL FI.RXER FERGUSON BELL SADLER PHILLIPS 

WILLIAMS GREENE PRESSON LYMAN EICKER BROWN WYKLE FISCHER 

BOWMAN HOLE BEAN HALLIWELL HOWE DAUBERMAN WISE ANDREWS 
GRAHAM H1TT LINDLEY FULLER RICHARDSON DOLE NEVILLE JUNE 



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Nellie Andrews 
Lillian Bean 
Norma Bell 
Dorothy Brown 
Emily Bowman 
Lucille Dauberman 
Laura Dole 
Lillian Dole 
Eugenia Eicker 
Florence Ferguson- 
Mary Fischer 
Edna Flexer 
Elizabeth Fuller 
Miss Graham 
Beulah Greene 



Pauline Halliwell 
Agnes Hitt 
Josephine Howe 
Grace Howell 
Marjorie June 
Ida Lindley 
Mary Lyman 
Florence Neville 
Harriet Phillips 
Lola Presson 
Juanita Richardson 
Lucille Sadler 
I [elen Williams 
Miss Wise 
Ethel Wykle 



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KOUPAL ERNEST HEDGECOCK KLINDWORTH 

GUYNN WELCH ALVERSON DAVIS WRIGHT FISHER 

BARNES HOTTES CARMAN RUFFNER COLLINS PEIRSON 
PARR SWANK LAWLESS CLEM LEE WISEGARVEK 

MCCLURE HITT KROMER HEATH HESS LAWSON 



WARD JAHR HARRIS 

THORNSBURGH FARNAM 
STATES SWIFT HOLMES 

BARNES DOLE HENRY 



0Sm*onau ^tteranj ^ozittyi 

OFFICERS 

Vera Hess President 

Nelle Barnes Vice-President 

Edith Heath Secretary 

Mary Law son Treasurer 

Winifred McClure Sergeant-at-Arms 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

Seniors 

Nelle Barnes Mary Henry Mary Lawson 

Ethel Dole Vera Hess Agnes Milne 

Eulalie Green Katherine Hitt Helen Snook 

Edith Heath Adelaide Kromer Marjorie Welch 

Juniors 
Effie Dunlap Winifred McClure Fern Harris 

Ruth Ernest Agnes Koupal 

Sophomores 
Laura Holmes Ellen Rourke Marion Weiss 

Mildred Klindwortii Rachel Ruffner Alice White 

Freshmen 

Ruth Alverson Nellie Hedgecock Gertrude Swift 

Eunice Badger Flora Hottes Zada Thornsburgh 

Eleanor Barnes Myra Jahr Esther Lee Toma 

Florence Carman Margaret Lynch May Wamsley 

Leona Clem Ila Monohon Ruth Ward 

Lucile Collins Nelle Moore Amy Weir 

Bertha Farnam Louise Parr Pauline Wisegarver 

Lucy Fisher Lucile Peirson Ethel Wright 

Merle Guynn Mary Louis States 

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MOTORCYCLE 
L<i C L U B' « 

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OFFICERS 

M. E. Hoit President 

J. W. Folsom Vice-President 

P. D. Amsbary Secretary-Treasurer 

R. A. Perry Road Captain 

Merle Alyea Assistant Road Captain 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

M. E Hoit G. I. Mitchell 

J. W. Folsom I. G. Morrison 

P. D. Amsbary F. W. Pusey 

R. A. Perry H. J. Finhold 

Merle Alyea H. Brooks 

R. S. Lutz • C. M. Crain 

A. M. Metzler Harry Rogers 
Carl Linbarger 




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MKTZLER PERRY HOIT 



CRAIN PUSEY MITCHELL 

FOLSOM AMSBARY Al.YEA 



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OFFICERS 

Lucile Needham President Florence Stoutzenberg Secretary 

Olive Hormel Vice-President Henry Sheldon Treasurer 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Ira Dickerson K. J. T. Ekblaw 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Graduates 

Mark Van Doren 

Seniors 
Henry Sheldon 

Juniors 
Olive Hormel 
Florence Stoutzeniserg 
S. D. Harwood 
Sophomores 

S. M. Raphaelson 
Freshmen 
Eleanor Tewett 



Mrs. E. M. Nickoley 
Elizaiseth Fuller 
Lucile Needham 

Lucile Reese 



Nellie Roberts 

Stanley Irvin 
Mildred Drew 




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REESE HARWOOD 

VAN DOKEN STOUTZENBERG 



SHELDON 
NEEDHAM 
485 



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JEWETT 
HORMEL 



IRWIN 



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WATSON 


CASTRO 


SOTO 


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officiat.es 

Presidente Honorario Prof. J. D. Fitz-Gerald 

Primer Semestre Segundo Semestre 

Tulio M. Castro Presidente Pons ( )ssa 

Rafael A. Soto Vice-Presidente Jane C. Watson 

Jane C. Watson Secretario Antonio Rodiguez 

Wilbur O. Pendarvis Tesorero Hugh Grigsby 

Orena Farmer Musico Orena Farmer 



J. D. Fitz-Gerald 
Jane C. Watson 
Olive Miller 
Louis Allen 
J. M. Castro 
Antonio Rodriguez 
W. O. Pendarvis 
Ovidio Oliveras 
S. D. Harwood 
Alfonso Octioa 



SOCIOS 

(Mrs. J. D.) Leora A. Fitz-Gerald 
Orena Farmer 
Helen Whipple 
P. G. Allen 
Louis Ossa 
Rafael Soto 
l [ugh Grigsby 
Camilo Lopez 
O. IT. Moore 
Ernesto Gomez 
Eleanor Jewett 



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CHEW HARRIS HIRTH BARDWELL JOHNSTON BROOKS FERGUSON 

LEHMAN BROOKS MAIRTY PUGH MYERS HITT HOSFORD BARTO WATSON 

KOUPAL BOGGES BERNHART HUNT LEE HIGGINS WILSON BENNETT CARTER RUTENBERG 

PRESSON BRADLEY KIRKPATRICK FORKEY ALLEN ALBANI) BLAKE WYKLE CULLOM DIETZER MILNE 

MORRISON THORNDIKE RICHARDSON GIBSON RINAKER BULL REED MOSS RICHARDS ALLEN 



Haus£fytflj& ^txtxitt Club 



Laura Alband 
Alice Allen 
Harriet Allen 
May Babcock 
Laura Bardwell 
Harriet Barto 
Marguerite Bennett 
Pearl Bern hart 
Winifred Blake 
Edith Bogges 
Carol Bradley 
Ethel Brooks 
Fannie Brooks 
Maud Bull 
Harriett Byrne 
Lucile Carter 
Grace Champlain 
Dorothy Chew 
Hilda Croll 
Elizabeth Cullom 
Alice Dietzer 



MEMBERS 

Florence Ferguson 
Mildred Forkly 
Mabel Gibson 
Fern Harris 
Marguerite Higgins 
Agnes Hitt 
Laura Hirth 
Doris Hollow ay 
Susan Hosford 
Florence Hunt 
Florence Johnston 
Helen Kirkpatrick 
Agnes Koupal 
Irma Latzer 
Ellena Lee 
Gertrude Lehman 
Grace Linder 
Maurine Mairty 
Winifred McClure 
Mary McDough 
May Miles 



Helen Morrison 
Leota Mosier 
Gladys Moss 
Julia Mottier 
Rachel Myers 
Margaret Perry 
Lola Presson 
Ada Pugh 
Hazel Reed 
Lenore Richards 
Juanita Richardson 
Dorothy Rinaker 
Marie Rutenberg 
( iRAce Taylor 
Clara Thorndike 
Leila Watson 
Isabella Wilson 
Adeline Wood 
Ethel Wykle 
Ruth Young 



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C. A. Hughes 



OFFICERS 



First Ouarter 1914-1915 

S. S. " 'is 



President 

F. VanDoken SS:f a r r v ident E H V W B R m°NG 

C. C. Walker Seci etary 



H. W. Hollard Treasurer.. 



B W. Fairbanks 

R. M. Johnson Sergeant-at-XrmZI ^ = 

B. W. Fairbanks Assistant Secretary *■ *•■ rtIPPLL 



Third Ouarter 1914-1915 

President W.H.Chambers 

Vice-President A B R^iurn 

..Secretary R- I" Sh_ affe ! 

..Treasurer. 



Second Quarter 1914-1915 

W. W. Wilson 

D. W. Dunlap 

C. J. North 

J. W. Laws a U^tanV Secretary -F. H. Stein 

F. W. Graves Assistant ^ecieiaiv... 

H. J. Johnson Sergeant-at-Arms C. E. Born 



A. R. Thomas 
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ORGANIZATIONS 



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L. R. Caldwell 
F. A. Davis 
H. P. Kelley 
C. C. Walker 
A. R. Gould 
H. J. Johnson 
J. R. Lindsay 
R. D. Lyman 
R. T. Shaffer 
Geo. Curtiss 
A. B. Rayburn 
R. T. Glasco 

A. R. Kinsey 

B. L. Sternberg 

E. H. Stevenson 

F. A. Walker 
R. E. Gavle 
T. D. Kahlert 

C. J. North 
A. R. Thomas 
R. N. Hart 

Ff. F. Attebery 
\i. Linnard 

. -. d. YOGELS 

H. E. Colsen 

W. H. ElCKHORN 
H. F. AlNSWORTH 

Ff. C. Albin 
C. Thorne 
J. F. Rom in e 
L. B. Birdsall 

H. M. LUMLEY 

A. W. Lewis 
Wm. Mandeville 
Ff. I. Huntington 
H. Rosenberg 
C. J. Badger 
A. Arends 
S. A. Walser 

R. M. 



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II. I!. Ingall 

F. H. Stein metz 
E. T. Davis 

E. W. Hitchcock 
A. R. Siebfns 
J. F. Hedgcock 
P. T. Leach 
T. f. Lacey 
H.'W. McCoy 
K. Epstein 
J. W. Laws 
D. W. Dunlap 

D. F. Marker 

G. B. Whitson 

E. R. Moburg 
W. S. Ladd 

J. A. Andrews 
C. H. Rehling 
C. E. Trout 
H. C. Olseng 
T. M. Simpson 
A. C. Hoffman 

F. M. Colcord 
I. J. Reinhart 
W. M. Richmond 

A. A. Olsen 
Geo. Salisbury 

E. C. Maddock 
C. E. Null 

R. V. Larson 
H. E. Turlev 

G. F. Binder 
S. A. Miller 
O. C. Beatty 
R. H. Klamt 
M. C. Smith 

B. W. Fairbanks 
B. H. Questel 

F. I. Wehrle 
Strickland H. F. Kraus 

489 



L. E. Minnis 

L. R. Lumlev 

J. A. Sackrison 

P. M. Smith 

W. H. Chambers 

M. H. Campbell 

R. E. Hipple 

F. Leggett 

W. F. Anderson 

J. F. Mills 

W. W. McLaughlin 

H. W. HOLLARD 

C. W. Brown 
M. G. Clark 
C. E. Born 
B. Brown 

E. V. Bruington 
N. Meltz 

F. Randall 
W. W. Wilson 
R. L. Strang 
W. R. Swanson 
M. E. Hoit 

A. L. Carlson 
L. E. Gossett 
L. Greenyard 
A. L. Kline 
H. L. Clapp 

G. L. Rigg 

W. A. Morkel 

E. L. Johnson 
A. T. Fish man 
O. M. McGee 
W. K. Parker 
G. M. Gehant 
P. E. Bower 

S. S. Davis 

F. W. Jones 

F. R. McCandlish 



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OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

E R. Brunskill President V. W. Haac, 

L. H. Dunham Vice-President L. H. Dunham 

A M. Heinzelman Secretary C. A. Zelle 

F. C. Hahn Treasurer W. B. Felger 

S. D. Kirkpatrick Custodian J. B. Brown 



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Prof. \V. A. Noyes 
Prof. S. W. Parr 
Prof. C. W. Balke 
Dr. D. F. McFarland 
Dr. L. Thorpe 
Dr. S. J. Bates 
Dr. C. G. Hopkins 



E. R. Brunskill 

F. C. Hahn 

S. D. KlRKPATRICK 

C. W. Lenzing 
H. (i. Lawyer 
V. W. Haag 
J. F. Smith 

B. M. Stubblefield 
H. E. Hogan 

J. A. Schulz 

D. W. Propst 

C. H. Utt 
S. Keitoku 

F. H. Tendrk k 
P. H. Jfnks 
H. R. Lee 
S. M. Hull 
C. S. McKellogg 
Jack Pyron 
C. E. Sims 



MEMBERS 



Dr. E. W. Washburn 
Prof. Edw. Bartow 
Dr. G. McP. Smith 
Dr. C. G. Derkk 
Dr. D. A. MacInnes 
Dr. G. D. Beal 
Dr. H. J. Broderson 



K. M. Holodav 

H. A. WlNKLEMAN 

C. C. Irick 

R. T- Gnaedinger 

A. C. Eide 

O. Kamm 

L. E. Dawson 

F. A. Martin 

0. Harder 

G. H. Mengel 
G. P. Edwards 
W. Zieman 

H. A. Schonle 
W. B. Felger 

1. L. Re Veal 

A. M. Heinzleman 
A. M. Landstrom 
H. S. Snell 
H. J. Bluhm 
A. F. Hakanson 



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OFFICERS 

First Semester 

M. O. Jensen 

P. G. Schiesswohl 

H. P. Greison 

E H. Pool 

Aii.x- Wagner Sergeant-at-Arms 



President 

.Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 



Second Semester 



P. Armour 

G. C. Faulk 

B. K. Van Winkle. 

F. W. Nichols 

L. W. Woltmann... 



President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 

.Sergeant-at-Arms 



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First Semester OFFICERS Second Semester 

G. H. Pike President ...T. W. Dieckman 

C. J. Anderson Vice-President R. C. Shaffer 

G. B. McMillen Treasurer E. M. Richers 

C. M. Clark Secretary A. M. Tower 

.MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Dean W. F. M. Goss, M.S., D.E. Dean David Kinley, Ph.D., L.L.B. 

Prof. C. R. Richards, M.E., M.M.E. Prof. E. R. Dewsnup, M.A. 
Prof. E. C. Schmidt, M.E. Prof. [. M. Snodgrass, B.S. 

Prof. A. M. Buck, M.E. Prof. A. F. Comstock, B.S., C.E. 

R. B. Keller, B.S. 



C. Y. Hsu 
C. J. Anderson 
Y. T. Cheng 
S. R. Bakhshi 
H. F. Boggs 
L. S. Chen 
C. M. Clark 
E. L. Davis 
T. D. Shonts 



MEMBERS IX 
E. G. Young 
O. C. Detering 
T. W. D i i:c k man- 
Max Kadinsky 
George Kurt 
A. H. Mason 
R. T. Elliott 
H. L. Howell 
Lee Klink 



THE UNIVERSITY 

W. R. PUNG 

W. B. Golden 
n G. B. McMillen 
\Y. R. Pierson 
Claude Raiborn 
E. H. Schlader 
A. M. Tower 
A. D. Staples 
C. Y. Lee 



M. YVinokur 
G. H. Pike 
Max Rukin 
E. A. Smith 
G. C. Whitley 
R. C. Shaffer 
R. Goldstein 
E. M. Richers 
C. L. Liang 



493 



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OFFICERS 
First Semester Second Semester 

F. W. Paniiorst President R. L. Morrell 

L. D. Knapp Vice-President A. K. Fogg 

P. W. Frf.ark Secretary J. 11. MiLLER 

A. Norberg Treasurer IF S. Mahood 



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I. O. Baker 
A. S. Baldwin 
Onward Bates 
G. W. Bremner 
J. Brooks 
H. L. Chipps 
T. L. Condron 

E. R. Dewsnup 

F. O. Dufour 
R. V. Engstrom 

F. G. Frink 

J. A. Anderson 
M. L. Angarola 
E. W. Bailey 

G. W. Blake 
R. C. Brandt 
R. P. Brown 

C. S. Bruner 
K. B. Bush 

D. M. Campbell 
C. H. Clarahan 

I. R. Cline 
R. S. Colton 
G. O. Consoer 
Seymour Corley 
V. D. Cylkowski 
A. Dappert 

L. L. Davis 
J. E. Demuth 
H. A. Derby 
H. W. Deakman 

II. W. Dodge 

[. R. Donaldson 



HONORARY MEMBERS 
L. L. Fallyn Ralph Modjeska 

H. Gardner L. G. Parker 

Dean W. F. M. Goss Langdon Pearse 
A. C. Hobart W. D. Pence 

G. C. Habermeyer G. W. Pickels 
A. S. Johnson B. H. Prater 

M. S. Ketchum Isham Randolph 



H. B. Kirkpatrick 
W. A. Knapp 
A. L. Kuehn 
C. W. Malcolm 



J. J. Ritchey 
A. F. Robinson 
G. H. Rump 
C. V. Seastone 



R. B. Slippy 
R. H. Slocum 

R. H. Smith 
L. L. Tallyn 
A. N. Talbot 
G. E. Tebbets 
F. E. Turneaure 
L. E. Waterbury 
R. I. Weber 
Z. C. Wiley 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



C. M. Ettinger 
M. W. Ellsworth 
C. P. Ernst 
K. K. Feng 
4. E. Fisher 
P. W. Freark 
J. C. Fitzpatrick 
A. K. Fogg 
Arthur Giertz 
H. J. Goldberger 
E. R. Goldman 
J. E. Grayback 
Ralph Green 
A. C. Grunewald 
Jesse Gary 
Arthur Hagener 
E. E. Hathway 
S. R. Heindel 
J. W. Hilbert 
C. E. Hungerford 
C. G. Jennings 
E. W. Johnson 



D. R. Jones 
H. E. Kelly 
D. H. Kennett 
A. R. Keller 
L. D. Knapp 
Herman Koepke 
A. C. Lee 
H. S. Mahood 
H. A. Marbach 
F. A. Marx 
J. D. Mattison 
D. E. Memmen 
C. F. Mercer 

C. A. Metz 

A. R. Montague 
R. L. Morrell 
J. T. Nolan 
Alfred Norberg 

D. R. Norris 

E. R. O'Conner 
E. A. Olander 
Bowen Palmer 



H. A. Panhoe 
F. W. Panhorst 
E. R. Rail 
T. D. Randall 
Walter Ritt 
J. Rooth 
C. B. Schmeltzer 
C. L. Sherman 
C. E. Smith 
T. E. Stockdale 
H. F. Stocker 
Felix Streed 
C. B. Taylor 
M. C. Taylor 
J. H. Tyler 
R. E. Turley 
A. C. Volk 
W. A. Wagner 
L. S. Webster 
T. H. Wilkinson 




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OFFICERS 
First Semester Second Semester 

R. L. Hermann President W. S. Haggott 

H. R. Richardson Vice-President R. V. Waller 

W S. Haggott Treasurer W. T. Reace 

S J Lurie Secretary R. A. Harvey 

R W Owens Librarian R. W. Owens 



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MEMBERS 



C. Anderson 

V. E. Aschermann 

J. M. AuBochon 

G. W. Ball 

W. Barber 

H. E. Barden 

E. D. Bell 

J. Beltz 

R. A. Burtnett 

C. H. Berwald 

E. F. Bolinger 

F. A. Brooks 
R. Brooks 

E. A. Brown 
L. R. Bryant 
W. E. Bull 

P. H. Burkhart 

F. E. Butterfield 
H. Chand 

J. B. Chartrand 
L. Church 

C. S. Cierpik 

A. J. Clarkson 

D. W. Cooper 
T. Cottingham 
O. L. Davis 

B. H. Decker 
W. C. Deiss 
M. B. Dewar 

E. J. Dix 

V. F. Dobbins 
A. D. Donnell 

C. Doolen 
H. E. Dralle 
R. Dunham 
U. S. Dunn 

A. M. Eleazerian 
J. H. Euston 



D. G. Evans 
H. F. Felton 
C. P. Ferrell 
M. Flood 
H. F. Froelich 
H. Gallaher 
A. A. Gilbert 

C. M. Ginther 

D. W. Gooch 
C. T. Grant 
L. R. Gray 
L. M. Gumm 
G. W. Ball 
F. A. Gunther 
I. H. Hackley 
W. S. Haggott 
A. J. Hair 
R. E. Hart 
R. A. Harvey 
L. C. Heckler 
J. R. Hegner 
R. L. Hermann 
C. F. Hood 
Z. Hsieh 

A. J. Huber 
M. C. Hughes 
K. B. Humphrey 
R. S. Jain 
E. A. James 
L. Jarmulsky 

B. Jarrett 
R. E. Johnson 
J. E. Johnson 
R. E. Juergens 
|. Kantor 
J. M. Ketch 
K. B. Kichlu 
T. Kawamoto 

J. E. Zoll 



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I. E. Kipp 

E. M. Koel 
J. C. Kuhns 
G. L. Kyle 

O. A. Lansche 
C. H. Eekberg 
A. H. Lenz 
G. II . Lindsey 

F. Lundgren 
S. J. Lurie 
R. S. Lutz 

E. McKeever 
E. McEvers 
L. C. MacMillan 
J. C. Mickelson 
J. H. Miller 
T. O. Moffett 
R. Mooney 
K. N. Nag 
R. Nakada 
R. K. Newton 
P. J. Nilsen 
H. L. Olesen 
R. W. Parker 
M. L. Pathak 
H. R. Pendarvis 
E. R. Petzing 
C. L. Pfeiffer 
E. V. Potter 
R. L. Price 
H. R. Purcell 
L. Rahn 
P. A. Raibourn 
C. B. Ray 
W. T. Reace 
E. F. Rehnquist 
E. M. Reschetz 
H. R. Richardson 
inger 

497 



D. K. Robertson 
J. A. Romig 

L. J. Rust 
R. A. Samuelson 
Q. N. Saperston 
H. Schlader 
H. C. Schreiner 
H. H. Schroeppel 
A. I. Schoch 
R. C. Schaffer 
A. J. Sheets 
H. K. Sheldon 
O. E. Sinclair 
W. S. Slack 

F. H. Smith 

A. G. Steinmeyer 
R. D. Stitt 
H. Sturm 

A. R. Summers 

E. Swanberg 
P. J. Sweeney 
S. Taketa 

B. Teeters 
R. Teets 

G. O. Tinkey 
M. L. Thomas 

C. A. Wagner 
P. Wallace 

R. V. Waller 
J. E. Walsh 
E. E. Warner 
C. S. Washburn 
T. K. White 
E. G. Wieler 
A. F. Wilkins 
E. A. Williford 
G. C. Wilson 
S. P. Winn 



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^Iccljantcal Jituiinccrs 



First Semester 

H. E. Austin 

E. F. Gehrk; 

C. W. Lincoln.. 
A. F. Barron 



OFFICERS 

Second Semester 

...President R. C. Malev 

...Vice-President Leo Eslick 

...Secretary E. B. Stout 

....Treasurer D. E. Miller 



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L. F. Armstrong 

J I. E. Austin 

G. T. Avery 

E. B. Ayres 

A. F. Baker 

E. C. Barkstrom 

A. F. Barron 

L. M. Becker 

C. F. Belshaw 

W. J. Bolton 

C. O. Borromeo 

L. Borucki 

V. W. Brinkerhoff 

E. A. Brown 

Paul Conklin 

E. W. Cobb 

E. P. Daly 

H. C. DlESERUD 

A. B. Domonoski 
L. Eslick 
W. E. Everham 
H. L. Flodin 
J. Frier 
E. F. Gehrig 
R. E. Green burg 
R. F. Greenfield 
G. D. Griswold 
H. J. Halterman 
L. Helander 
M. R. Hoffman 
M. Holm burger 



MEMBERS 

R. M. Husband 

0. C. K. Hutchinson 
Stanley Hanson 

J. B. Jefferson 
M. C. Johnson 
R. B. Johnson 
V. A. Kerr 
C. L. Knodle 
L. P. Kurt 
C. T. Keigley 
C. E. Koch 
W. N. Larson 
A. C. Leverenz 
G. I. Lindberg 
H. W. Linneen 

C. W. Lincoln 

1. L.Lummis 

R. D. LUNDELL 

A. G. Lundgren 
A. N. Lungren 
J. B. Macauley 
R. C. Maley 
R. S. Mason 
E. S. McPherson 

D. E. Miller 
G. I. Mitchell 

E. E. Mohr 
J. H. Mohr 
R. B. Murphy 

R. T. MURRILL 

Mueller 

A. U. Zimmerman 



Arthur Marx 
A. L. Nelson 
J. R. Nelson 
R. C. Newman 
E. A. Nordstedt 
E. W. Noxon 
J. H, Ogg 
R. M. Overton 

E. C. Peirce 
H. Quick 

G. H. Radebaugh 
A. W. Robinson 
J. H. Ramser 
I. A. Rueff 
O. Rue 
L. E. Rugh 
R. W. Ruth 

F. Raffowitz 

D. C. SCHEELE 

L. H. Schickedanz 
W. S. Shiveley 

F. L. Shonkwiler 
R. Stephens 

E. B. Stout 

F. E. Troxel 

G. H. Tin key 

G. Vandeboom 

J. B. Wainwright 
R. E. Wiley 
R. C. Wheeler 
R. E. Weinshenker 



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OFFICERS 

H. H. Walters President 

W. H. Simon First Vice-President 

G. H. Thomas Second Vice-President 

C. K. Carpenter Secretary 

B. E. Dirks Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

E. Pihlgard M. H. Harris R. H. Purdy 
Dorothy M. Clayberg H. H. Walters L. Pinault 

F. Rounds H. M. Martin T. H. Buell 
H. A. Smith T. W. Forlove C. Hauber 

F.' Dunlap K. B. Fannan D. B. Schuler 

R. L. Jordon C. F. Weingartner J. P. Pinkley 

A. S. Graven R. M. Lirder L. D. Marquis 

r' Thiele M. S. Stephenson E. J. Potter 

S. N. Vibelious J. Walker C. K. Carpenter 

T P. Russet A. W. Schucker E. H. McCauley 

J S Bartley A. E. Benson E. F. Miller 

L. E. Dunlap H. C. Fuller H. F. Knappenberger 

C. L. Ritts A. F. Kirkland C. E. Runyan 

C. A. Gustafson H. Dubin G. C. Faurote 

W. A. MacNelly E. F. Knemeyer R. R. Zipprodt 

H. G. Overend W. II. Simon 



500 



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OFFICERS 

R. A. Strong President N. M. Morris Second Vice-President 

J. H. Griftner Vice-President D. C. Johns Secretary 

H. E. Wilson Treasurer 

MEMBERS OF THE TECHNOGRAPH BOARD 
J. H. Griftner H. E. Wilson 

MEMBERS 
Geo. S. Rice, E.M. H. I. Smith, E.M. 

U. S. Bureau Mines U. S. Bureau Mines 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
H. H. Stoek, E.M. S. O. Andros. E.M. L. E. Young, E.M. 

E. A. Holbrook, E.M. R. Y. Williams, E.M. A. C. Callen, E.M. 
MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Graduate 
M. L. Neeel 
Seniors 
J. M. Silk man J. H. Griftner C. C. Hubbart 
R. A. Strong 
Juniors 
H. E. Willson 

Sophomores 
N. M. Morris 
M. J. Reed 

Freshmen 
G. W. Marshall 
L. Wasson 

501 



R. G. Perry 



D. C. Johns 

Seizo Ban 
T. C. Hoo 

R. Kraft 

A. Livingstone 



C. T. Lu 

L. H. Whitney 
B. C. Tsin 

L. YlNDROCK 

Thos. Fraser 



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HOEHN H. KEESE JEWETT EDWARDS ROSENBERG LIBMAN 

STEINMEYER ROBERTSON BUCKNER SMITH HUNT MONCRIEF CHRISTOPHER 

GOODMAN KATLINSKV BUHAJ KAHN CRAWFORD YEAGER TREISCHEL 

A. KEESE GEIGER RATHEON DEAVER WILLIAMS BUCHER SCHAULIN HILL 

BOOZE BROMBERG LINBARGER LYON NELSON STULL BISSEL WHITELAW 



H= 



(Uttmnxts §fwfaty 

OFFICERS 

Idris Nelson President 

J. B. Lyon Vice-President 

S. C. Linbarger Secretary and Treasurer 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
R. T. Stull B. S. Radcliffe 

R. K. Hursh A. E. Williams 

R. R. Danielson 



MEMBERS IN 
I. Nelson 
S. C. Linbarger 
L. A. Deaver 

F. J. Hill 

W. O. Rathfon 

G. F. Bissel 
N. Bromberg 
J. B. Lyon 
F. S. Hunt 

H. H. SORTWELL 

A. J. Keese 
L. E. Yeager 
F. Katlinsky 
A. S. Buhai 
E. R. Goodman 
J. L. Crawford 
E. W. Smith 
H. H. Edwards 



THE UNIVERSITY 

G. M. SCHAULIN 

C. F. Geiger 
A. W. Keese 
J. C. Whitelaw 
M. C. Booze 
L. C. Bow 

E. G. Bucher 

J. W. Moncrieff 
H. S. Robertson 

F. J. Hoeiin 
R. C. Rahn 

C. C. Treischel 
F. B. Christopher 
F. I. Rosenberg 
J. P. Smith 
F. A. Jewett 
R. Stein meykr 
K. S. Stke 



O. S. Buchner 



502 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




MILLSON ROBERTSON LYON CHASE DEAVER 

LINBARGER SCHAULIN HOEHN BUCKNER BOW TREISCHEL 

HURSH STULL NELSON DANIELSON WILLIAMS 



y^nmnoB 



PROFESSIONAL CERAMICS FRATERNITY 
Founded at the University of Illinois, 1915 

HONORARY MEMBERS 
Ray Thomas Stull, E.M. Ralph Kent Hursh, B.S. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 
Graduates 



R. R. Danielson 



L. C. Bow 
L. A. Deaver 



O. S. Buckner 

J. A. Chase 
F. ]. Hoehn 



A. E. Williams 



S. C. Linbarger 
G. S. Schaulin 



Seniors 

Idris Nelson 

Juniors 

J. B. Lyon 
W. C. Millson 
H. S. Robertson 
Chester Treischel 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




RAIBOURN SNYDER HENSEN 

BILLMAN HOHMAN SCHOEMBS BRADY HELM BRISTOW 

MORRISON LEONARD WHEELER MORGAN WHAM MORRISON 

lijjuptian (!llub 

Established ipo6 Colors— Purple and White 

OFFICERS 

W. E. Wheeler, Jr President 

T. S. Morgan Vice-President 

J. H. Gilbert Treasurer 

L. D. Bunting Secretary 

F. A. Schoembs Historian 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Dean O. A. Harker F. W. Scott, Ph.D. F. W. Simpson 

RESIDENT MEMBER 
E. B. Creighton 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Seniors 
W. N. Leanord R. E. Leopold R. D. Chapman 

Benjamin Wham H. J. Halterman W. R. Morrison 

W. E. Wheeler 

Juniors 

A W Bristow Ray Hensen Claude Raibourne 

L. D. Bunting /S. Snyder T. S. Morgan 

I. IT. Gilbert H. C. Helm H. IIohman 

W. W. Hart W. E. Krebs J. Crebs 

Elliott BlLLMAN 

Sophomores 
F. A. Schoembs W. T. Brady Niles Schuh 

Paul Whitehead 

504 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




ELNOAAH 
SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 

L. J. Greengard, '16 President 

J.Cohen, '17 Recording Secretary 

C. H. Berwald, ' 1 s Treasurer 

Sidney Casner, 'i6 National Councilman 

Karl Epstein, '17 Corresponding Secretary 

Frieda Newman, '18 Historical Secretary 

D. Horwich, *i8 Sergeant-at-Arms 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Simon Litman, Ph.D. D. S. Blondheim, Ph.D. 

Jacob Zeitlin, Ph.D. Emma Felsenthal, B.A., B.L.S. 

A. H. Roller, Ph.D. Gertrude Niederman, M.S. 

E. C. Baldwin, Ph.D. J. B. Natiianson, M.A. 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

Post Graduates 

A. Babbitt, A.B. 

Seniors 

C. H. Berwald H. Dubin M. H. Harris N. C. Seidenberg 
N. Bromberg E. R. Goldman L. Ribback C. E. Smith 

D. Clyman J. L. Stern N. Sapperston 

Juniors 

A - S. Buhaj L. J. Greengard R. L. Moses M. Winokur 

Sidney Casner H. S. Katzenberg A. H. Polakow M. Radinsky 

R. Goldstein C. A. Klein F. Rosenberg F. Raffowitz 

L. J. Krane H. B. Rosenberg 

Sophomores 

D. S. Beilin K. Epstein F. Katlinsky H. S. Saltzman 

J. L. Bloch G. L. Freund SelmaLowenstern I. Sholem 

A. I. Clamitz H. L. Fried S. J. Lurie II. Zeter 

I. M. Cohen H. J. Goldberger Hazel S. Lyons Ruth Weil 

M. C. Ehrlich Char. Goldberg R. Marblestone R.E.Weinsiienkkk 

J. Cohen E. R. Goodman Leanor Roseman Della Weiss 

Freshmen 

Bertha Bing H. E. Goldin A. Livingston A. R. Pastel 

C. Cohen D. Greenberg E. Mautner B Rosen 

M. E. Davis L. Horen H. S. Millman W. S. Rose 

A. Eichberg D. Horwich H. Myerson P. Schloss 

W. H. ElCHHORN L. JARMULUSKY S. J. NeIBERG A. SHAPIRO 

U. G. Godowsky Anita Libman Frieda Newman M. Spitz 

Aline Wolff 

505 




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ORGANIZATIONS 



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ROOS 



RUEDI MOLL 

E. T. COLTON BEARDSLEY 

R. S. COLTON THOMAS SIEMENS 



HOMAS 


COX 


TEASDALE 


THIES 


BAUER 


GILL 


LEAVENS 


BRADLEY 


NESLAGE 



1jmn£££ 



INTERFRATERNITY MISSOURI CLUB 



Established 1910 


Colors — uia < 




ACTIVE MEMBERS 


W. M. Siemens 


W. L. Nichols 


A. B. Leavens 


J. T. Bradley 


A. G. Degen 


J. V. C. Gregory 


M. L. Thomas 


R. R. Thomas 


H. S. Beardsley 


H. R. Cox 


E. T. Colton 


R. S. Colton 


G. H. Hoffman 


J. G. E. Kipp 


O. J. Neslage 


T. E. Pyron 


C. H. Ruedi 


W. C. Savage 


H. O. Seigmund 


J. W. Teasdale 


E. G. Roos 


H. W. Lance 




Pledges 


Walter Theis 


G. E. SCHAUMBERG 


Chas. C. BROOKS 


Philip M. Butler 


Joseph Monnig 


Paul Moll 


Clarence Gill 


Elmer Bauer 



Colors— Old Gold and Black 



500 






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ORGANIZATIONS 



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GOODRICH SILVER VVHITTEMORE DOREMUS MALLET 

Mrmpir CRANK e , SNY1,ER "RAZEAU SMITH PATTON MACKECHNIE 

MCROBIE SILKMAN WEILAND GAMBLE MORSE FISH 



BACHER 



portly .Atlantic (Elub 



Established 1914 



Colors — Sea Green and Gold 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Alfred Copeland Callen Pennsylvania 

Henry Joseph Weiland Connecticut 

George Frisbie Whicher Massachusetts 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

H. R. Backer ...New York D. W. Crane New lersey 

L F Brazeau New York W. L. Doremus New Tersev 

/: L p F \ S f New York D. McRobie New Jersey 

H W M A A ^ LE S 6W l° Tk R W ' PATT0N New Jersey 

H. W MacKechnie New York M. G. Silver New Jersey 

K. S. Whittemore New York N. J. Mallet Pennsylvania 

J. M. Silkman Maryland J. H. Morse Pennsylvania 

R. J. Goodrich Massachusetts J. A. Smith Pennsylvania 

<j. S. Snyder Pennsylvania 




507 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




WESTERMAN GOMEZ U 

OLIVERAS GONZAGA 

SOTO GOMEZ OSS A 



SALKRNO OCHOA 

GARZA RODRIGUEZ 

OCONNER CASTRO 



Founded 19 13 

OFFICERS 

Louis Ossa Lorca President 

Elias R. O'Conner Vice-President 

Jose C. Gonzaga Vice-President 

Ernesto A. Gomez Secretary 

Julio M. Castro Treasurer 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Prof. Arthur R. Seymour 

MEMBERS 

Louis Ossa Lorca Chile 

Rafael Soto Puerto Rico 

Ernesto Gomez Mexico 

Ovidio Oliveras Puerto Rico 

Camilo Lopez Mexlc ° 

Jose C. Gonzago frazil 

"Julia M. Castro Luba 

Elias R. O'Conner Argentina 

Antonio Rodriguez ......Cuba 



Ramiro Gomez.. 



.Mexico 



Jao Salerno Brazil 

Rodolpho Westerman :r ra . 



Mexico 



Alfonso Ociioa 

Roman de la Garza Me * KO 

Enrioue Cruciiaga O Chile 



508 



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ORGANIZATIONS 




BRUNS RUCKMICH MEIER PFEIFFER ZIMMERMANN 

MILES GRAHAM SCHAARMANN CUTLER LIBMAN GREEN ROURKE 

ALEXANDER WILLE TINSLEY WALZ BADE GOLDBERG EPPINGER JEWETT 

C. \V. BADE KREIDER PASMORE LUDWIG KLAMT ZUCKER 



Per Jbittstlje ^txmx 



Founded 1905 



Colors — Black, White and Red 



Alexander Green 
Lois Miles 



MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Christian Alban Ruckmich 
Adolph Edward Zucker 



MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 



C. W. Bade 
Floy Cutler 
Fay Fischer 

Grace Alexander 
C. H. Bade 



J. G. Eppinger 

A. C. HOLINGER 

R. H. Klamt 
Charlotte Goldberg 



Irene Berger 
H. E. Bruns 
Helen Darmstatter 



Graduate 
Alice Meier 
Fred Pasmore 
f. d. schaarmann 

Seniors 
Pearl Bernhardt 
Grace Howell 
Clara Lillie Hirtzell 
Juniors 
Frances Klank 
Emilie Waltz 
Mildred Coburn 

Sophomores 
C. L. Pfeiffer 

F. H. Steinmetz 
Freshmen 
Joseph Dvorak 
Elizabeth Graham 
Eleanor Jewett 
Paul Arndt 



R. W. TlNSLEY 

Ida Warden 

R. P.. ZlMMERMANN 

Mary Trowbridge 
Laura Wille 



L. J. Ludwig 
Hazel Lyons 
B. P. Reinch 

Mary Rourke 



P. G. Kreider 
Anne Libman 
Helen Miles 



509 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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SACKRISON BIGLER 


SEIDENBERG 


KIRKPATRICK 


BRONSON WELLS 


PIHLGARD 


IRWIN RUKIN 


ALLER SIEBENS BARLOW 


WEBBER 


MORRISSEY POWELL 



^m franklin Club 



Ralph Linden Barlow ■•■■■-; President 

Edward Henry Morrissey Vice-President 

Eric Frederick Pihlgard Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 
Dr. B. E. Powell Arthur Ray Warnock 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Active Members 
Nathan Cook Seidenberg Ray Ira Shawl 

Ralph Linden Barlow Sidney Dale Kirkpatrk :k 

Arthur Robert Siebens Stanley Pieffer Irwin 

Richard Valentine Waller Fred Sheaff Wells 

Edward Henry Morrissey Roger Beckwith Bronson 

Mark Van Doren Eric Frederick Pihlgard 

Harry E. Bigler Max Rukin 

Harry Edwin Webber Joseph Morgan Noble 

fuLius Alvin Sackrison Clarence Milford Ferguson 



510 





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ORGANIZATIONS 






i 



N 



VAN DYKE 



BERG 



PETERSON" 



KENT SMART MATHER 

VROOM CRVDER E. GRUNER DERBY R. GRUNER HECKETSWEILER NFUHAUSER 

RUBY YOUNGLOVE HEDGCOCK DUNHAM ROSS JANSON RUSH 



(ttangregaiianal <SmU> 



Established April, ign 
Colors — Lavender and White 



Flower — Sweet Tea 



S. K. Hughes 
W. A. Noyes 

E. J. TOWNSEND 
H. F. CiODEKE 



HONORARY MEMBERS 

T. A. Holmes 
F. D. Rugg 
N. Spencer 
S. P. Atkinson 




MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 
Graduates 

Clarence Samuel Ross John Moller Janson 

Seniors 
Lawrence Henry Dunham George Benjamin Ruby 

John Harrison Hedgcock Clyde Charles Younglove 

Ira Leon Rush 
Juniors 
William Chandler Peterson Roy Thomas Hecketsweiler 

Harold Leslie Derby Benjamin Conrad Berg 

Raymond William Gruner John Elmer Gruner 

Everett Frank Kent 
Sophomores 
John Henry Cryder Earl Henry Van Dyke 

Chauncey Harrison Smart Warren Isaac Robinson 

Freshmen 
Asa Frisbie Mather Quinby Vroom 

Edwin Valentine Neuhauser 



511 






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ORGANIZATIONS 




BEVIS HOSTETLER LITTLE PENDARVIS 

DELONG SALISBURY WILLIAMS CADISCH SIEBENS LEACH SAVAGE 

ELLIOTT DOUGLAS NILSEN WATSON HERSMAN 

% M. C A- 

OFFICERS 

P. J. Nilsen, '15 --» President 

T. W. Watson, '16 Vice-President 

G. F. Cadisch, '17 Recorder 

Professor I. O. Baker Treasurer 

Lloyd C. Douglas General Secretary 

E Glen Hersman Assistant Secretary 

CABINET 

A. L. Bevis, '16 JiMe Study 

T W Watson '16 Fraternity Bible Study 

G. W. Salisbury, ' 1 5 Membership 

F H Williams, '16 Publicity 

P. J. Leach, '15 ^^ US1C 

W. E. DeLong, '16 Missions 

W. E. Savage, '16 ~~- Soml 

A. R. Siebens, 'is ...Deputation 

T. C. Hostetler, 'is Industrial Service 

C. R. Little, '16 -Boys Work 

A. R. Elliott, '16 Geneva Club 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
Professor S. W. Parr Rev - J as - c Bakeb 

Professor I. O. Baker P- J- Nilsen 

Dean T. A. Clark ( '• "■ PlKE 

Dean K. C. Babcock . A. R. Siebens 

R. F. Little V II. Grunewald 

F. II. BOGGS R.R.ZlPPRODT 

E. S. Scott 

512 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



FIRST CABINET 




MADDEN EA sT JOHNSTON 

HARRIS ENINGER JOHNSTON JUNE 

WATSON NEWBURN RUTENBER 

TODD PACKARD HOLTON CURRY CARTER WARD OLIN 



LIGGETT KOUPAL GOOCH 

JACKSON WOLFE BARTELS 



% m. at. a. 



OFFICERS 

Alice Carter President 

Mamie Ward Vice-President 

Irene Olin : Recording Secretary 

Ethel Todd Corresponding Secretary 

Bessie Packard Treasurer 

Elizabeth Curry General Secretary 

Frankie Holton Assistant Secretary 

SECOND CABINET 




WRIGHT 

DAUBERMAN 



MCCLURE GOLDSHMIDT 

HILLS BURGAN 

LAWSON MILLIZEN 



WEILEPP ANTHONY 

HOLLOWAY FISHER DILLE 




WARD RINAKER 



HOLTON 



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ORGANIZATIONS 






WALWORTH 


WILLIFORD 


ELLIOTT 


KEITOKU 




LIANG 


LEWIS 


MRS. S. T. SMITH 


WONG 


BOGGES 


MILLAR 


. SMITH 


MATTOON 


ENINGER 


S. T. SMITH 


CARTER 


JANSON 



OFFICERS 

Stewart T. Smith Leader 

Maude Bui . i Assistant Leader 

Whitaker Mattoon Secretary-Treasurer 




STANTS W. SMITH MENELEY DARMSTATTER SEASS 

G.SMITH HILL LENSE MILLER CAMPBELL BERNINGER WILLIAMS BUTZER ACKERSON MURTY BROCKMEIER 
LIEVENTHAL DAUBERMAN NEWLIN GENNINGS MILLER MCDONALD WISEGARVER LACKEY 



fMlpnro GLtrdc 



OFFICERS 

Maureen Mavity President 

Verna Butzee Vice-President 

Blanche Stipp Secretary 

Kate Lackey Treasurer 



514 



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Illinois 8 



ORGANIZATIONS 



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%t GLtxtk Jfemtais 



., . OFFICERS 

M. Allen . 

M. Anastassiadis \, ? tes } d ™t 

M. Schetnitz '" Vice-President 

Mlle. Randolph -Tresoner 

Mlle. Samuels Secretaire 

Mlle. Seamens 7 Secretaire 

Correspondent 

MEMBERS IN THE UNIVERSITY 

D. H. Carnahan hum 

D. S. Blondheim ?■?• ^ 00RE 

C. S. Carry £ f ° LIVER 

J. Kessler £ £ w PELS 

1. Lr. Wesenberg 
Eouis Allen 

c „ Undergraduates 

J. CARMAN t T, r 

H. L. Senserman T ;5n T . ERMAN 

M. Gardner Po^p S 

J B Childs Randolph 

Katherine Hitt Helen Whipple 

A. M. Bagusin f;i D J R T KS 

O. A. Randolph Eillian Thompson 

S.Karren L^r 

E. Anastassiades 5^"? ^ HANT 

R. A. Soto f/ EEYN Gehant 

W. Perry M Caster 

E. Smith f p £ ild *e* 

J. M. Rhodes 7 £ £ ALMER 

R. Birch £ T" ^ 0UNG 

Frances Klank L^HhT 




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REESE 



LEGCETT 



SEMPLE ATTEBERY MURPHY MUNSON 

JONES W F CAMPBELL KOLMER LINNARD SHAFFER CHALCRAFT 

H J 10HNSON HEDR1CK LYMAN TUPPER GOULD FITCH P.RUINGTON 

I\WS HARVEY D.T.CAMPBELL HUNT LATHROP SHIELDS A.WILSON CROSS 

SHAWL SACKRISON MATTESON L.JOHNSON TROWBRIDGE GLASSCO CALDWEL 

FRAZER BAKER REHLING FARLEY W.WILSON 



MAC FARLANE 



PITTS 



LLOYD 



Hoof an* lorn €luh 

OFFICERS 

First Semester Second Semester 

C. H. Rehling Herdsman F. W. Farley 

A M Baker Assistant Herdsman T. H. Lloyd 

E. V. Bruington Recorder of Pedigrees H. F. Attebery 

G. C. Frazer Commission Man A. Semple 

J.W. Laws Swipe C. H. Rehling 



H. F. Attebery 
A. M. Baker 

E. V. Bruington 
L. R. Caldwell 
D. J. Campbell 
W. F. Campbell 
L. W. Chalcraft 
G. A. Cross 

D. E. Currier 
G. Curtiss 

F. W. Farley 
H. J. Fitch 

G. C. Frazer 
R. T. Glassco 
A. R. Gould 

A. D. 



L 



MEMBERS 
R. F. Harvey 
G. Hedrick 
L. L. Hunt 
H. J. Johnson 
L. S. Johnson 
W. R. Jones 

W. C. KOLMER 

C. L. Lathrop 
J. W. Laws 

F. Leggett 

E. W. Linnard 
T. H. Lloyd 
R. D. Lyman 
M. MacFarlane 

G. H. Matteson 
Wilson 



516 



W. 



T. J. Munson 
E. F. Murphy 
W. K. Parker 
|. J. Pitts 
R. L. Reese 
C. H. Rehling 
G. L. Ritchie 
J. A. Sackrison 
A. Semple 
R. F. Shaffer 
R. I. Shawl 
J. E. Shields 
J. L. Stern 
C. L. Trowbridge 
J. O. Tupper 
W. Wilson 




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ORGANIZATIONS 



=R 




K 



ENINGER 
PKESSON 

MATTESON MCCHEE 



BRUINCTON DE WERF HIRTZEL 

MY ERS SIEBENS BROOKS THOMAS 

MCCLURE HITCHCOCK LYONS THOMAS 



RIGG 



drountr^fjfejiariitb 

OFFICERS 

E. W. Hitchcock President 

Florence Keller Vice-President 

Ethel Brooks ~ Secretary 

Polly Thomas Treasurer 

A. P. Miller Program Committee 

MEMBERS 
Lucile Needham Mrs. A. Hamilton 

Susan Benson Clara Hirtsel 

Helen Eninger Florence Keller 

A. R. Thomas Clara Lyons 

Pauline Primm o. M. McGhee 

Carl Gustafson Rachel Myers 

Jean McInnes Lola Presson 

Persis Putman Myrtle Renz 

Frank Walker a. R. Siebens 

Eula Cordell Elmer Roberts 

Polly Thomas q L. Stewart 

W. A. Strong J. o. Tupper 

Olive Reid Frank Turner 

Ethel Brooks Maud Warnock 

Winifred McClure Ruth Bumgarner 

Mae Ormsby q. H. Matteson 

W. P. Miller Grace Stevens 

A W. Nolan Florence Stoutzenberg 

E. V. Bruington Floyd Carter 

Myrtle Curzon 



L 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



*.•* 



=R 



I 







BLOCK 


MC ELVEEN 


MEALIFF 


ELTON 


MILLS 


CREBS 


ASHBECK 


SLAYTON 


METZLER 



GRABBE RENWICK EMMOND 

RAMEY KRUG BROWN 

CARR BRADLEY CHATTERTON 



ftdfgnt 



Founded at Illinois, 1914 

William Louis Ashbeck 
Edward Stevenson Block 
Jack Thomas Bradley 
Robert Rea Brown 
Vernon Wesley Carr 
John Lamphier Chatterton 
John Powell Crebs 
Wyatt Goan Emmond 
Alexander Stuart Elton 



JUNIOR SOCIAL SOCIETY 



Colors — Red and Brown 



MEMBERS 



John Christian Grabbe 
Sylvan Dix Harwood 
Louis Gustave Krug 
William Thomas McElveen 
Arthur Edward Mealiff 
Arthur Maurice Metzler 
Fred Leon Mills 
Frank Willard Ramey 
George W. Renwick 



Willis Francis Slayton 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



*.•* 





MINNIS 
RUSH 



NOXON 



BRANDON 



L. R. LUMLEY VANDEN BOOM H. M. LUMLEY 

STIRTON JACKMAN MILLER BRISTOW 

BURGOON BROOKS HELM BRUINGTON 



FRIER 



WRAY 

BUERKIN 



KLAMT 
BEBB 



%&\s<mit 



Founded at Illinois, 



Edwin Adams Bebb 
Joseph Franklin Brandon 
George Washington Bristow 
Raymond Harrison Brooks 
Earl Vivian Bruington 
Julius Allan Buerkin 
David Warner Burgoon 
John Frier 

Herbert Clarence Helm 
Charles Harold [ackman 



JUNIOR SOCIAL SOCIETY 

ws Colors- 

members IN THE UNIVERSITY 



-Orange and Blue 



Charles William Wray 



Robert Herman Klamt 

Harold McLean Lumley 

Leslie Robert Lumley 

Daniel Edward Miller 

Lemuel Ernest Minnis 

Elmer W'arner Noxon 

R. L. Rush 

Ralph A. Scott 

James Crear Stirton 

Gerry Christopher VandenBoom 




519 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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(Hoilegtf JBattdng Qllxtb 



MEMBERS 

William Harrison Bennett Lloyd Dunaway Knapp 

Chester McElfreash Chain Guy Ennis McGaughey 

Harold Edward Clark Wesley Kayler Norris 

Milton Gans Silver 



I 




MCGAUGHEY ELTON 

NORRIS BENNETT 



KNAPP 
CRAIN 



CLARK 



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JUast button 



The chances are strong that you will find something in the next forty pages 
concerning yourself, or interests that are vital to you. You will undoubtedly be 
stirred up by this to a greater or less degree. If you are inclined to take these 
things personally I ask you to bear in mind the following: First, to be men- 
tioned at all proves yourself in the lime-light and well enough known to furnish 
good reading matter. Second, I was given the task of writing a Roast section 
and not a Y. M. C. A. Hand-book. The University was demanding strong stuff. 
It has fallen my lot to write it, and to quote the words of the irate father, who 
with a resounding whang impronged his hand on a thumbtack in the lad's trou — , 
My boy this hurts me worse than it does you. 

But in all seriousness, it has, and nothing could ever tempt me to accept such 
a task again. I assure you that the things said in the next forty pages are entirely 
impersonal with me, for I am very sure that there is no one in the University who 
bears less ill-will against anyone. I have worked on the theory that if everybody 
was hit, nobody could complain. I hope the theory is workable. 

EDITOR. 



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Ladies and gentlemen. Step this way for the big sight-seeing bus — we show 
you the town, we show you the campus — you see it all and you see it quick. For 
the nominal price of fifty cents you will absorb nearly as much college gossip 
as does the average fraternity frosh who flunks out the first semester. We do 
not, however, attempt to divulge any sorority skeletons, as our stand-in with the 
women must be preserved at all costs, so the Pi Phis may wheedle their 

drinks out of the University men and the Kappas may 
continue to allow Laura Bardwell the freedom of 
the kitchen every night without fear of being dis- 
closed by us. All aboard — hang on to your hats, and 
the bus starts right away. 

3ri5 GTIub 



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We are just pulling away from the Iris house, my 
friends, which is the home of the Champaign Law and 
Order League. Whenever the Urbana Christian En- 
deavor becomes too gay about the campus, the Council 
of Administration points with pride to the Iris club 
as an example of a well ordered fraternity. Still the men's privileges are not 
curtailed to such a great extent. They are allowed to go to all the Y. INT. C. A. 
meetings, after which they may play checkers, chess, or authors, just as they 
prefer, providing, of course, that they retire by nine-thirty. Last year a gay 
young freshman of some thirty-five summers started to chew gum in the house, 
but the more sedate members were quick to settle the ruffian, brother Hersman, 
whom you see in the door-way, has just read the thought for the day, and the 
seraph quartet has rendered "It's a Long Way, My Cod, to Thee," so they will 
file back into the monastery and smoke their favorite brand of cubebs. We are 
now rolling down the street called Creen, famous from the poor farm to the 
golf links. 



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On our left we see the white front with the letters P. A. D. on the door. 
It is a den of vice and the home of the ornery Lawless Fraternity. You may 
know some of its memhers, but we doubt it. The corner house on the right, 
however, is a place of interest to all. This is where the Chi boys eat, drink, and 
cut classes. Look out for the ball, madam. These lads are strong for playing 
catch in front of the house, as that is considered regular frat stuff. The man 
who is now delivering the pill is Swede Westlund. Swede is a varsity baseball 
man, and went through the Conference season last year with only two errors. 
He fell off the bench in the Chicago game and forgot to bring String Thomas a 
chew at Minneapolis. Hide your eyes, ladies. Here comes Johnnie Silkman, 
and he seems to be under the influence of Coke Ras. Never mind, Eddie Block- 
will take care of him. Eddie and Johnnie have both been there before. 



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Look across the street, brothers and sisters, and you will see where the Psi 
Us. are sleeping theirs off. When they wake up, they will assemble in Skibbo's 
room for an eye-opener. For further information regarding these beer hounds, 
I refer you to the first 997 pages of the thousand-page report of the Society for 
the Prevention of Drunkenness and its By-products. Still, it doesn't seem like 
the same old house without the famous curly-headed couple, Reber and Wright. 
Next door is the D. U. gymnasium. Yes, little boy. you are right. This is an 
awful place for Potsy Clark to have to live, but then he didn't know he was going 
to be Potsy Clark when he joined. 



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Oh, goodness ! I forgot to show you the Woods' shed on the other side of 
the street. They call it T. K. E. or D. K. E. I forget which. We are now 
approaching the University business district. The large store with the awn- 
ing up, on your left, is Harris and Mead's candy shop. No madam, that man 
you see in front, by the pop corn wagon, is not the janitor. That's Del Harris 
who invented the famous La Vogue chocolates, which have done so much to 
make Champaign famous, and the University sick. If all these chocolates were 
at the bottom of the ocean, it would be a good thing for the co-eds and the 
Junior prom, but pretty hard on the fishes. 



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Next, my friends, you will see Kandy's tonsorial parlor and rough-neck's 
rest haven. Kandy, who stands behind the first chair, is quite a boy. He can 
shave you without taking off your collar, and could even give Po Field a hair- 
cut without taking off his hat. Burrrrrmp— Burrrrrrrrmp— Burrrrrmp, Boom, 
Boom. Don't cheer, boys, the poor fellow is dying (or should be). Yes friends' 
you are all correct. It is Col. Joseph Nathaniel Greene, leading his vast and 
formidable army. Note his fine, erect bearing, the flash of assurance in his eye 
and the easy grace of his gait. Well, papa was one before him— No. not a 
gate— a military man. Joe has a little song that he sings on his way to and from 
the armory, which runs, "My Mother brought me up to be a Soldier, She didn't 
seem to want no pride and joy". All we can add is, she didn't get anything 
thrust upon her. Joe is a member of the Sigma Nuts eating club, whose chief 
plea to distinction is that they own a couple of lots next to the D. (i's. 



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On the left hand corner, you will get a very good view of the Co-op, or 
University supply store. No, I do not know why it is called Co-op, and neither 
does anyone else, but what's in a name ? Here they sell everything from text 
books to shoe strings. I've heard that men have been known to buy the latter 
without getting cheated. Hold on tight, we're going around the corner. Here 
we catch a glimpse of the college itself. It has many things, however, that you 
can't see from here, such as the foot-ball team, a dean of men, a reputation, and 
a Students' Union. Hang on, we're going to turn again. 



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You wouldn't think that they could crowd 649 people into the house ahead 
of us, but that is the number living in the Sigma Cheese tenement, according to 
the latest census report. Think of all the fathers with large families that live 
in these congested quarters. That's Art Odell you see on the front walk. Note 
the care-worn look on his face. The poor boy is all tired out trying to make the 
Students' Union presidency amount to something. It certainly is a lot of work 
to put on one man, but Art is the little fellow that can take care of it. He is on 
his way now to preside at a meeting of the organization which will probably 
decide some important University question, such as, "Who shall sell buttons at 
the next home-coming", or, "How many dances should be played at a cadet 
hop". See Walton's Sick's out in front. He leaves it there most of the time to 
give an air of blase aristocracy to the place, which is very pleasing to Doc 
Covey and the new pledges. 



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The near colonial building across the street is the A. T. O. house. That 
long-legged boy you see walking thru the yard is String Thomas. Old settlers 
of the town say that he was quite a ball player in his youth, but he is now way 
past his prime, and for the last two years has put up a hard fight to hold down 
the job of Third Benchman. That head stone and fresh mound which you s.-c 
in the side yard is the spot where they buried the late brother Krug, who was 
so cruelly sent to his death by Brother Tommy on the tenth of last February. 
That pompous sophomore, standing in the doorway, is Powers, of Decatur. I 
would be glad to tell you what great things this man does, but you could get a 
much more vivid account from him, and he would just love to tell you. The 
place has but one distinction. Pogue lives here. You will notice that they are 
putting a sign to that effect in the front yard. Oh, look at Tops Hartford and 
Bill Ashbeck — Too late now, they've turned the corner. 



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Next door you will note the University mission— no, not the church— the 
one on the far corner, home of the old I 'hi Damma Gelta brat. That's ferry 
Rayburn you see sitting at the window with his head in his hands. I [ e is trying 
to decide whether to fire G. Huff or not. lie had better ask Blondy about it. 
There is a meeting in Joe Pitt's room, discussing the question of what to do 
with the black sheep Wagner. You have probably heard the popular sorority 
query, "How did those lovely Phi Gamm boys ever pledge that horrid Mr. 
Wagner?" The answer is that the symptoms did not break out (ill his sopho- 
more year, and then it was too late for him to go Delt. 

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Friends, I hardly know how to describe the large yellow mansion across 
the street. You had better all take off your hats and we will proceed slowly. 
The D. K. E. athletic association, if I remember my facts correctly, was founded 
by G. Washington, the day after the eventful cherry tree episode. This little 
fact alone gives a prestige which sets them apart from ordinary fraternity men. 
A few years after this event, most of the members had to resign for the purpose 
of crossing the Delaware, and the charter was given up until several big "I" 
men could be tempted into its midst. A few years ago a man had to be a Deke 
or a D. U. to hold a locker in the training quarters of our gymnasium. This 
state of affairs, however, has been greatly relieved of late, so that now it is quite 
possible for a foot-ball player to get a rub-down without giving the trainer the 

grip. Freshmen athletes are 
~~} kept in training by a simple 

) i little game called "Chimney- 

Chimney- Who can climb the 
Chimney?" or "Polishing the 
Escutcheon". The Dekes get 
valuable social experience by 
attending the exclusive Stu- 
dent Union d a n c e s. See 
Sandy McDonald exercising 
in the back yard. His neat 
little trick of falling into the 
water like a Lincoln Park sea- 
lion has gained much fame for 
the organization. Here comes 
Pethybridge, who won his "I" 
last fall by playing a star post- 
season game. Well, an "I" is 
an "I", and will have to be 
counted, just like the strikes 
that Peewee makes at Rock's. 
Here, here, little boy, you will 
have to stop making those 
faces — What ? Why, no he 
didn't. He was just smiling 
That's Goat Emmond, of Illini fame, and he never made a face at a 
in his life. He was just born that way. That's Gip Davis on the front 
Why no, I don't know why he walks that way, unless he saw Bart 
That would be reason enough for Gip. The man with him 



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walk. 

Macomber do it first, 
is Gunkle. They are a great pair, and the University has prospered and developed 
to a remarkable extent since these two assumed charge last year. I have heard it 
rumored, however, in official circles that they have been persuaded to sell the old 
place to the state and we will soon be able to walk about the campus without feel- 
ing that we're overtaxing their generosity and good heartedness. That statue 
you see in the back yard which so closely resembles an old woman is Bill Bennett. 
It was given to the Dekes some six or seven years ago and will probably stay 
with them for several more. At this point in our tour ladies and gents it is 
customary to submit to the pasengers the puzzling enigma, "Why is Gene 
Schobinger's neck like a typewriter?" — What's that, madam? — I was unable to 



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catch what you said because Gip was whispering something to his friend and your 
voice was drowned out.— Oh— You said "Underwood"— Correct— Somebody 
usually gets it right away. We are behind schedule friends, so put your hats on 
again and we will proceed. 



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This humble little bungalow on our right, is the home of Delta Tan Delta, last 
of the old conservatives. Over the door you will notice the motto, "To H— 1 with 
Brother Babcock". Brother Babcock is the misguided individual who is trying 
to make a slide rule out of a spigot, figuratively speaking. Even the Delts, how- 
ever, have of late succumbed to the wave of reform, and are now so cleansed that 
they drink elder at Interscholastic with only a slight grimace. Time was when 
the little Japs would fall over in a faint if a guest asked for a glass of water, 
and some ill-mannered frosh would have to be tubbed for snickering. You will 
note that they have constructed a bowling alley on the front lawn. They are 
bound to win that cup next year. Zeke doesn't care much for the idea, lie says 
the weather is apt to be cloudy at this time in the spring. See the youth coining 
down the walk. I r c looks for all the world like Vernon, approaching the Castle 
I louse, hut it is only Wallie, the accomplished sophomore. Eddie will drive up 
in a taxi from his ten o'clock class soon. How do I know? Can't you see the 
frosh standing on the curbing, waiting to carry the great man's books into the 
house? 



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You see on your right, friends, the Kappa Sigma house. I am unable to tell 
you anything concerning these people, whom no one knows, but I have heard 
that some of them are members in the University. Directly across the street you 
will see the T. N. E. house. Here they feature such startling freaks of nature as 
Clark and Junkuntz. Freshmen often stop here for a few days before pledging 
themselves to some other fraternity. You will note Jack Bradley and Red Burg- 
ston on the roof. They are trying to get away from the rest of the gang. We 
all feel sorry for Jack and Red. 




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Anybody want to go and see the barbarians in the outlying districts, such as 
the Zeta Beta Tan Tabernacle, graced by Rabbi Casner, or the Chi Psi Lodge? 
I thought not — very few people do. What's that, Mister? — You think you must 
belong to the latter organization, as you belong to most of the lodges? No, my 
good man, you do not belong to this gang, even though you may be everything 
from a forty-ninth degree Mason to a second rate Wood-chopper. This is a col- 
lege man's fraternity, but like Fatimas, the Chi Psis are Distinctively Individual — 
no gold tips but finest quality. I would like to take you down to see the Phi Psi's, 
but as Chapman is probably over to the Theta house and George Richmond is 
out of town for the week end, I'm afraid it would prove uninteresting. The Phi 
Kap house is also in the same direction, but we had to cut it out of our regular 
route, as so many passengers mistook it for a railroad station, and began to get 
nervous about crossing the tracks. 



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No, madam, that building on your right is not a dormitory for the under 
classes, nor is it the state capitol. It is the home of the famous clan of Beta 
Theta Pi. Within its walls they house three men and sixty-five other Betas. No, 
I do not know what they do with the rest of their space. The gentleman here 
on the front row suggests they might herd sheep. It is a den of vice, and con- 
tributes very largely to the delinquency of our girls. Every Sunday night they 
entice innocent young co-eds into their resort and persuade them to partake of 
their lettuce sandwiches. Brother Phelps of the faculty then entertains with 
roguish capers and sly pokes in the ribs, after which the entire chapter join in 
singing "How would you like to be a Beta sweetheart?" During this ceremony, 
the handsome Bill Jones is placed in the front row, and there are few women in- 
deed who can resist the allurement of this effect. See the little fellow on the side 
porch. Oh, no, that is not the mascot, that is Gardie Rogers, the "Friend of the 
Feminine Frosh". The sour look which you see on his face is not entirely his 
fault. They say that as a child his disposition was spoiled by his playmates, who 
insisted upon taking his tatting away from him at recess time. Their worst 
crime, however, is the Campus Scout. A Blantant, Bantling Budget of Bugby's 
Boneheadedness, which Brother Barlow, the ossified man, inflicts upon us daily. 



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Hang on, ladies, we're going to turn down First street. Look out, Miss, 
don't flirt with that young man on the corner. He has started many young girls 
on the downward path, and is just as heartless as he is good looking. That's Paul 
Whitehead, though 1 am unable to tell you what he is doing way out here. Ahead 
of us on our left is the Zeta I'si house, home of Mike Wolter, Captain Watson, 
and I forget who else. Watson lias inaugurated a great fraternity men's reform 
in the University. Well, he ought to be a good reformer, didn't he spend four 
years in the reform school ? 



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Here we are back on Green Street, with the Phi Delt house on our left. The 
Phi Delts boast of two features: The Mills Automatic Orchestra, and Steve 
Birch. Next door is the Alpha Delta Phi house. This is the spot where the 
Bohemians of the College spend a few hours early each morning. The qualifica- 
tions for membership in this organization are : An inclination toward skimpy 
trou, and utter disgust for work, a slouch hat at least four years old, and 
a "Teamster's Delight" sheepskin jacket. I am sorry we will not pass the arcade 
again, or you could see a chapter meeting in full session. See the cute little tablet 
on the side of the house. No, this is not a memorial to the ambitious athletic 
brothers who have failed to annex the coveted "I". Such a tribute would require 
the whole side of the house. You will notice Eddie, Rube, and Cooper on the 
front porch, dreaming of what might have been. Do you hear the noise coming 
out of the third story? That is a freshman telling an upper classman how the 
place should be run. The Alpha Delt freshmen are the worst trained in the 
village. They don't believe in tubbing them for fear of hurting their feelings. 
Oh, look at the boy in the swing, wearing a stiff collar, think of it, a stiff collar, 
what a relic of barbarism! It must be some rude visitor from the Delta Omega 
house. 




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This shanty across the street, friends, is officially known as the Theta Delta 
Chi Charge, home of the Illinois gym rats. With the aid of G. Huff and the 
Phi Gams, this crew manage the athletic end of the University in a very acceptable 
style. Look around and you will notice some of the lights of the institution. The 
man with the little cap is Ferguson, who, according to the traditions of the house 
supports his family on his honest earnings from the managerial position which 
he holds with the base-ball team. No, friends, the popular idea that G Huff is a 
Theta Delt is entirely wrong. Just because his office usually looks like a chapter 
meeting of the Charge (whatever that means) is no excuse for the insidious 



535 



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rumor. The Theta Delts' chief delight is recounting the glories of Shorty 
Kneisley, winner of the coveted Chet Maguire prize. Shorty was some boy — Mask 
and Bauble actor — manager of something or other, and a lot more stuff that no- 
body knows, or ever knew, but him. lie was sure acquainted with it, however, 
hut modestly gave the credit all to dear old K. M.I. 



|!l)i Ji%tna 3gappa 



That Uncle Tom's cabin which you now see on your right is the Phi Sigma 
Kappa house, home of Dutch Schleuter, Butch Talbert, Art Metzler and like cut- 
throats. The Phi Sigs are the Beau Brummells of the College and a man on an 
Arrow ad looks shamefully like a Sigma Pi in comparison. The Allies haven't 
much of a stand-in with this crew of loyal sons of the Vaterland, still they hate 
to miss out on anything. Do you remember when Dutch Schleuter went to the 
Irish banquet? The succession of discords which you hear pouring out of the 
house indicates that one of the musical genii are starting to work for next year's 
stunt show. It's a safe bet they'll win it, too. If the Phi Sigs would quit going 

out after every cup within a radius of u8>4 
miles there would be more room to turn 
around in the house. What's that? Madam, 
I am no scandal monger. Let Pewee attend 
to his own love affairs. 

There are still a few Greek letter institu- 
tions which we might visit, but we would 
see very little. There is the Alpha Sigma 
Raithel Phi house, but any one can see him at 
any time. We might go way over to the 
Acacia house, but these are queer birds and 
I hate to inflict them on your sunny disposi- 
tions such a bright and beautiful morning. A 
short interview with the Acacia crew has been 
V ^K ^ j^r 1 known to make the sick sicker and even the 

d^ZZH^^ ^= — >==^ vveu - indisposed. Oh, see who's coming up 

the street. It's none other than Perry Graves, 
the Dashing End from Rockford. Every time 
I see Perry I think I have to make a wish. 
Cap Squires, who also conies from Rockford 
and who plays the other end, is so knock- 
kneed thai he has to wear roller bearings at 
the point of contact. At that I imagine Chicago would like to have a few such 
freaks scattered through her team. 

Here we are, ladies and gentlemen, back to the starting point. Watch your 
step in getting off, and if you were pleased with the morning's outing don't admit 
it to your friends, and if you were not— D( )NT TELL ME. 




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Which would you rather join, Beta The first of the year a fraternity 

di- the Cosmopolitan Club? pledge looks forward to the initiation. 



Wouldn't Bob Burton make a swell 
banquet for a family of squirrels? 



Let's lay off that Theta fire stuff 
and discuss the Pi Phi Flood. 



Rube Marquardt is an Alpha Delt, 
but you can't hold that against him. 



Prof. Bentley is a Phi Psi, but you 
can't hold that against them. 



From the actions of several of the 
members of the senior society we de- 
duct that the pronounciation of the 
word is Muh's-a-wonder. 



When Eddie Wallace gets on his 
Persian Lamb overcoat many people 
take him for the president of the Uni- 
versity. 



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This is not so, however. 



The morning after he looks behind 
to see the results. 



Joe Greene did not capture Lee at 
Appomatax. 



Grant did. 



The Student's Directory contains, 
R. F. Field '18. 



The Campus Scout is the humorous 
column on the Daily Illini. 



Judging by the same scale, the 
obituary column is a scream. 



The Alpha Chi's say Sandy Mc- 
Donald has a wonderful physique. 



They ought to know. Look where 
he rooms. 



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BULLS THAT WE KNOW 

Bull Durham. 

Sleeter Bull. 

Some bull — "All the frats are after me." 

The Cop. 

Pi Phi Bull. 

Maude Bull. 

Bully — alias Maj. Webster. 



V£AA WE^S A, SMH.6, 



A LITANY FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS TO BE CHANTED ON 

RISING EACH MORNING 
From Saturday classes — from convocation — from the Jimmy Giggle — from 

Urbana — from Kappa open houses — from Macomber's wit — from the Dekes 

from Barlow's campus scout— from Tommy Thompson's cynical glance— from 
Blondy Norenberg— from Turner's orchestra— Good Lord deliver us N B 
AND Sid Casner. 

A PRIVATE ONE FOR THE USE OF PHI GAMS 

From the demoralizing influence of motion picture shows — from the wanton 
wickedness of soda drinking— from the horrible depravity of a trip to Danville— 
from the direful beckoning of swinging doors, glittering lights and low cut 
gowns— from the suggestive contortions of the modern dances— from poker, chew- 
ing tobacco, and free lunch counters— from another regular brother like Dutch 
Wagner— Good Lord, may we be protected. 



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SEVEN WONDERS OF THE WORLD 
Taxi Allen at an eight-o'clock. 
Nig Healy's graduation. 

Wallie Frazier pinched for disorderly conduct. 
Iris reserves first row at the Orpheum. 
A friend of Joe Keller. 
An Alpha Delta Pi at a club dance. 
J. C. Hostettler in Danville. 



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WILL SETTLE THE STOMACH AFTER LAMPING THE ABOVE 

No, this is not a picture of the Cenclall County Camp Fire Girls while on a 
vacation in the North woods. It depicts a group of sedate Illinois school teachers 
under the seductive influence of summer school anil the Woman's building. 

PLAYS OF THE SEASON WHICH HAVE COME TO CHAMPAIGN 

Follies of 1914 Student Union Opera 

Peg-o-my Heart . Alice McCall's 

Potash and Perlmutter Casner and Seidenberg 

Under Cover Joe Keller 

The Misleading Lady Ann Voss 

Daddy Long Legs Miller 

The Winning Widows Thompson and Balkema 

Damaged Goods B's memory book 

Garden of Allah Chi Omega house 

Watch Your Step Walt Frazier 

On Trial Mac Booze 

The Little Cafe Studes crumb shelf 

The Decent Thing to Do Stay away from Danville 

Our Children Gladys Lovewell and "Gardie" Rogers 



We know the Chios by their dress, 

The Kappas, studious occupation, 

The Alpha Zees by their house of cards, — 

The Pi Phis just by reputation. 

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jackword, turn backward, O Time in 

thy flight. 
Give us a girl that's not dressed like 

a sight. 
Give us a co-ed whose charms howe'er 

few, 
Are not all exposed by so much 

peekaboo. 
Give us a freshman, no matter what 

age 
That won't use the street for a vaude- 
ville stage. 
Give us a girl, not too shapely in view 
And dress her in skirts that the sun 

can't shine thru. 
Then make her a gown that shows 

such poor taste 
That the back of its neck doesn't reach 

to her waist, 

Those rough Phi Psi boys to the front For we sensitive men as you must all 
again. admit 

Will soon have to dance with wool 

mittens or quit. 



Overheard at a sorority row afternoon card party. "Will one of you girls with 
a cheap corset please pick up that card I just dropped?" 

Pi Phi — "Oh, the Betas gave us the nicest tea." 

Whitey — "Tea, H the Phi Psi's '11 send you a couple cases of Bud." 





?uzz/-e Ticlu re - VJko teloN?s 
To Th«se1- 6 



p _Help! Help! Assistance! Oh! 

Bystander — What's the matter with 
Po, has he got the cramps? 

Alpha Delt Friend — No, he's just 
sitting on a tack and too lazy to get 
up. 




541 



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Princeton proudly points to Wilson, 
Harvard gives us Roosevelt's name, 

Jacksonville held Billy Bryan, 

Yale has Taft to spread her fame. 




I 



ILLINI ON WAY TO 
GOPHERS' BORROW 
WORK 00T IN CHI 



NORTHMEN DEVELOP MODE SPEED 

i*s Minnesota Correspondent 

v Death Will Probably Keep Valu : 

able Dunnigan Out of the 

Contest Tomorrow. 




Special to The llllnl. 

Chicago, Oct. 29. — The team took 
a snappy workout this afternoon 
at the White Sox baseball park. 
Every player is In good condition 
and eager for the fray. 



(Sidney Casner, the competent sport- 
ing editor of The Daily mini, Is ac- 
i corapanylng the team on the Minnesota 
trip. He will cover the big Gopher 
same for The Illini in his characterise 
v tle excellent style.) 



IggcJaJ to The Daily, Illini. 





Illinois — Oh, sad, sad story. 

Struggling o'er the sands of time, 

Lived long years in black oblivion, 
Raised no heroes — grand — sublime. 

Ah, but through this desolation 
See that brilliant light break out. 

Shining, sparkling, effervescent 

SIDNEY CASNER— sporting scout. 

Lift your heads, all ye Illini, 
Look around and view the flowers, 
Presidents may come from Harvard, 
But immortal Casner's ours. 

He's the man that put this Uni 
On a par with other schools, 
Gave G. Huff his start in baseball. 

Helped old Hoyle form all his rules. 

Picks each fall the All- American, 
Walter Camp — his non de plume, 

So stand back, plebian mortals, 
Give this demigod more room. 

If you're of a nature skeptic, 
( )ften much inclined to doubt, 

And you don't believe this — ask him, 
He's the man that let it out. 



Ik 



542 

55 



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8% Bailu tttluti 



THC V&ATWH 



VOL. XXXX 



S/D CASN£R 
W/LL ACCOM 
PANy T£AM. 



C OMPETEN T 
SPORT/NO EOITOA 
W/LL RCPOffTGAME 



MR JiPNfY J.CASNfl! 
THf wru.-K»foWN AMP 
VfR.SATIl.e- .JPOR.T- 
iwa tQITox covuleo 

rot THe paiuv 

ILUNl . Cow STANT 
RrAD»»5 or T"f 

tl-HN\ ARt- WFkt- AC- 
"SUAIHTgO WITH THIS 
SPO«.T STwofcuTS 
K.C-CM \USvGrHT IHTO 

An soiws of Ath- 
i-F-Tic eonTfsTs; 

HIS ACCUflAT*- AC- 
COUNTS AMB ASovt- 
AH. *t WlVlTAgl.^ 
JTYlP - - Due- TO HIS 
KEMAHKABt^ Picon- 
CC-NCY MB. CASNE-R. 
HAS «tl» TH* OrflCX 
OF SPoa-Tiuc fPITOH 
OH THP- IU-1MI fVfR. 

5inct- that PRPt-a. 

WAS 5TA0.TI-0 ANO HE 
PROBACY wila. w»».o 
IT Tn-U HE \?\r.S 



~\VEDNESDAy OCTOBER /&, /"7/7T 



"77aJ-< 



SfEMD VACATION 
/A/ //VO/A/S/A . 



NOTED 7ZA33I 
WILL JPFAK 



MOSES AND 
BUHA/ W/A/ 
TOURNAMENT 

SE CO/WHO /VfAJO/> 
SPORT 



Z. ETTA 6CTA TAU 
GA/eS 3/G 



Mtr\\o.f\S\H 



KLEIN PliAWJ 
TRouoqut 
VAqe- 

BF3T AK.T SIRE-Ai 
HAS i£-f-M IU 

re- A us 



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We append a miscellaneous expense account of Sidney Casner and Nicholas 
Seidenberg, delegates to the Zeta Beta Tan convention held in New York. 

2 packs Mecca cigarettes 10 

9 cigars .15 

Cabaret show and lunchs 35 

Tip to waiter 09 

One pillow on chair car enroute .25 

Moving picture shows 20 

1 pack Uneecla Biscuits and 1 can soup, enroute 15 

Pool and billiards - 10 

Newspapers .02 

Drinks for visiting delegates 10 

Grand Opera and Vaudeville 00 



( ! rand Total $ i.c I 



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A few of the daylight amusements. The censor cut out the flash-lights. 

You may be surprised to see two pages of an Illinois Roast Section devoted to 
South Haven. If such is the case, it is a safe bet that you have never breezed over 
to this Atlantic City of the West for the purpose of spending the "Fourth" or 
Labor Day in a bathing suit. South Haven is rapidly becoming the summer 
school of the University of Illinois. For years, several of the best known men 
about the campus have waited on table (if you can call what Bart does, waiting) 
at the Virginia Beach Hotel on the North Shore. There is not enough space to 
begin on a description of this college man's paradise so will have to leave you to 
glean as much as possible from the pictures. We print a list of a few of the 
Illinois people who have spent parts or all of the last two summers at South Haven. 




Hart— King of all beach-ants ami idol of the Boston store girls. 



L 



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77j? 79/^ CV<?w 0/ Illinois Hash-hounds. 



Enos Row 
Frank Pethybridge 
Bart Macomber 
Mac Booze 
Buck Ramsey 
Bob Ramsey 
Stan Pogue 
Harold Pogue 
Slip Cogdall 
Jas. Kendall 
Clinton Kendall 
Fat Krug 



Bill Ashheck 
Sid Kirkpatrick 
Gladys Moss 
Winifred Blake 
Chet Hemphill 
Paul Boston 
Goat Emmond 
Katherine Ranger 
Kelly Ennis 
Clif Westcott 
Jack Griffin 
Frank Thorne 



Marie Freeman 
Hana Harris 
Marg. Spaulding 
Jimmy White 
Rod Vansant 
Ralph French 
Pete Nelson 
Walter Irwin 
String Thomas 
George Blake 
Norman Patten 
Bop. Reimert 





A few of the scenic attractions. 



545 



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Y - -* Sllmots a, r. JL 

(Suggested for the next Mask and Bauble play.) 
The Mask and Bauble Actor of Mask and Bauble Fame. 



\ 



THE HONORABLE A. M. BAKER, JR., 

Supported by 

Miss Mary Caldwell 

In the Thee- Act Tragedy 

%\}t present present's present tu % 
present presiifrent 

( To be staged by Maskers and Baublers. ) 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 
(In the order of IMPORTANCE) 
The Hon. Mr. A. M. Baker, Jr., President of Mask and Bauble. 

Miss Mary Caldwell, In love with Mr. Baker. 

Miss FIilaii Jane Link, Interlocutor. 

Mr. Mitchell Wolter, A Herald. 

Miss Emma Pursley, For the PRESIDENT. 

Miss Nell Patterson, A member of a committee. 

Miss Mae Sexauer, Also a member of a committee. 

Mr. F. C. Ferguson, Chairman of the committee. 

( )ther club members, messengers, and interlocutors. 
A Synopsis of Acts. 

Act I — Scene i. 
Scene: A Stairway near 206 University Flail. 
Time : Five minutes before the meeting of the club. 
While F. C. Ferguson, the treasurer of the club, is ascending the stairs to a 
business meeting, he is met by the president, Mr. A. M. Baker. A lengthy dis- 
cussion by Baker follows, the gist of which is: "Make a motion before the club 
to give me a token of appreciation of my services to the club". 

( Curtain ) 

Act 11 — Scenic 3. 
Scene: 206 University Hall. 
Time : At a regular business meeting. 
F. C. Ferguson proposes to the club, that, since Mr. Baker has been so 
faithful in his work, a present would be fitting to show to the president the 
appreciation of the club. Mr. Baker, amidst confusion and many blushes, offers 
the president's chair to the Vice-Pres., Mitchell Wolter. Mr. Baker leaves the 
room softly murmuring, "This is so sudden". 

( Curtain ) 



F 



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\ 




Act II — Scene i. 
Scene : Two telephone booths. 
Time : Any busy afternoon before the exams. 
The honorable president calls up the treasurer, who is chairman of the "pres- 
ent" committee, and asks him (Ferguson) to accompany him (Maker) while he 
( Baker) picks out the present for him(self). 

Baker: "I saw a hue one up at Craig's, Ferguson. It is a gold watch fob, 
just such as I would like. A man is standing with his arm upstretched, as if to 
signify success in dramatics, oratory, or debate. It is listed at $15, but if we 
are sweet to the clerk, I think she will let us have it at about $10 or $12. Call 
up the other members of this memorial committee, and tell them that you think 
twelve or fourteen dollars will not be too much to spend. And say ! Fergy, you 
had better call up some of the other club members — about ten or twelve — and 
tell them that you are going to spend that amount for the present. You are treas- 
urer, and they will think that if you are in favor of spending that much money 
it will be all well and good. Fergy, come over to dinner to-morrow night on 
the strength of this present. No, I can't go to-morrow morning, because I have 
classes. Oh! you can cut your afternoon classes for a thing like this." 

(Curtain ) 

Act II — Scene 2. 
Scene : Various places on the campus, where the club members might 
discuss this ponderous question. Classrooms, streetcars, telephone booths 
or the library. 

Time : Scandal time. 
The various members tell each other of the plan of the president, and argue 
pro and con, mostly con. 

(Curtain ) 

Act III — Scene i. 
Scene : The club rooms. 

Time: The last meeting called by Mr. Baker. 
Mr. Baker, expecting to receive his present, opens the meeting with his 
farewell speech, a thing well known, only after many attempts to give it in an 
oratorical and dramatic style. Before finishing this masterpiece, Mr. Baker is 
interrupted by the Herald, who announces to the club that the committee on 
memorials has a report to make, but that the report must be made in the absence 
of the president. The noble hero of the play, keen in all matters of mental 
calibre, here realizes that a plot has been constructed against him. He quickly 
ends his speech by offering to everyone present a sad, impressive "Goodbye". 
After a short hesitation that is painful to all, he says, "Mr. Wolter, I turn every- 
thing over to you." Again, his "Goodbye" rings through the dead silence and he 
is gone. The chairman of the memorial committee arises to make his report — 
a hushed silence — "Unfavorable" comes the word like a death sentence and the 
heroine of the play falls in a swoon. Several attendants rush up to the assistance 
of the fallen lady and soon the whole meeting is thrown into wild confusion. 
Miss Pursley, a personal friend of the president, remonstrates in his favor, but 
Miss Link ends the play with the dramatic lines, "Any man who has nerve 
enough to ask for a present should have backbone enough to withstand the 
refusal of it." 

( Curtain falls on the floor ) 
(The End) 

IL " Jl 



^ : : ^ gMmns a- K -f 






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CO-EDUCAIION 




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ORGANIZATIONS 



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R0 0T FAUROTE MOONEY 

BROWN MILLER BRUNER 

(Bfcangpe an* ^Ixtt Ranting GLlxtb 

C. S. Bruner President 

K. V. Root Vice-President 

G.'c. Faurote Secretary-Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

C. S. Bruner G. C. Faurote 

K. G. Brown E. S. Miller 

K. V. Root R ay Mooney 

521 

■ V ■■■■■■■ ■ ^&S^ i ■ i • 




r 



Illinois 2 

ORGANIZATIONS 



1 



I 




SLAYTON 



DEWEY 

BEAUBIEN 



ERNST 
DEMUTH 



POTTER 



(Ergstd jPanrin« QLhtb 



J. E. Demuth 
E. V. Potter 
E. C. Dewey 



MEMBERS 



W. F. Slavton 
W. P. Beaurten 
C. P. Ernst 



H= 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



I 




I 



HARWOOD GOULD MILLS BRUINGTON BOVARD 

BEARDSLEY HILL SHOLEM REESE 

EICHBERG SIEBENS WILLIAMS WALLER BORTON 



IXTER-PUBLICATION JOURNALISTIC SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 

President F. H. Williams 

Vice-President A. R. Siebens 

Secretary H. S. Beardsley 

Treasurer R. E. Hill 

Sergeant-at-Arms L. W. Reese 

Program Committeeman J. K. Barber 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 
J. K. Barber R. Hill 

F. R. Babcock S. D. Harwood 

H. S. Beardsley J. ]. Lacy 

M. F. Bovard J. T. Mills 

C. \V. BORTON D. PULCIPHER 
H. BOESHENSTEIN L. W. REESE 

E. V. Bruington J. J. Sholem 

A. J. Eichberg A. R. Siebens 

H. R. Ferguson W. W. Sheldon 

A. R. Gould A. M. Tower 

D. M. Glover R. V. Waller 

F. H. Williams 



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ORGANIZATIONS 



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RAY 

HEGNER 



PETTIT 
HENDERSON 



WILSON 
SHELBY 



JULIAN MACKIE LUCY 

FRIER COLTON MC COWEN GARTH 



Established at University of Illinois, 1913 

ACTIVE CLUBS 
University of Chicago University of Wisconsin University of Michigan 

NATIONAL SOUTHERNERS' CLUB 

E. Shelby, Jr President 

T. J. McCowen Vice-President 

J. R. Hegner Secretary 

L. C. Ray Treasurer 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

John Frier B. H. Lucy 

C. T. Garth E. T. Mackie 

B. Henderson A. E. Pettit 

R. E. Johnson L. C. Ray 

S. M. Julian W. O. Wilson 

F. W. Pusey 



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Competition ^.^^^L\..- 

Week Beginning. Lrf^<^^^^,.J' jr . 




Friday 



Saturday 




l &y%^t<f> ^*- < -^^ ! ^-*'wfiteSaggesurasOT^»er Side 



Really, Gobbo should be more careful about leaving his weekly reports 

lying around. 



OUR FINAL GRADUATION 

The scene is Hades and that grand old Dean of Men, Satan, is doling out 
the punishments in an admirable manner, fitting the penalty to the crime. Sid 
Casner is to be bored to death by seeing himself as others see him, while Dean 
Clark is being bored by a fearful pair of eyes behind an immense pair of goggles. 
Nat Carson is getting a dose of her own medicine by having her arm talked 
oft", and the fate of Polly Adams is too terrible to describe. Ragtime friends 
are tortured by the raucous tones of that horrible pest, Bart Macomber, singing 
popular Roy Jones anthems, and Zeke Currier and his friend Lawnie are up to 
their chins in beer but can never drink. Dean Meyer, as is fitting, is being drawn 
and quartered, and all the little devils are operating on Bill Bennett to try to 
make a man out of him. In the background we see Tip Davis teaching all the 
South Haven beach ants to do the Pigeon-toed-giggle on a red hot dancing floor, 
and Butch Talbert is sitting in a spirited poker game where he continually draws 
to an open flush but never connects. 

Tailor — "What size pockets do you want made for the trousers?" 
Firebaugh — "Pints." 



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Jean to Hank — "Let's drop in and see Faith." 
Hank — "No, we better not; Bart may be there." 
Jean — "No, he's not — the lights are on." 

549 



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jk Jfircslpnan's Olarben of Setae 



The Pi Phis, we're told, had a beautiful lamb 
Whose morals were spotless and pure, 

Till she started to go with that Alpha Delt Po, 
Now she's taking the Keeley cure. 



I'at-a-cake, pat-a-cake, jeweler man, 

Make some moke pins just as fast as you can, 

Mould them and stamp them with big SX 

For we've missed a few men from this big PI. of I. 



L 



Sing a song of five cents, 
a pocket full of pennies, 

See the great big husky Deke 
Treating all the jennies. 



Hickory, Dickory Dock, 
The darn sorority clock. 
The clock struck ten, 
Out go the men, 
Heaven knows when 
They will come again. 
Hickory, Dickory Dock. 




TWs€ SIX flcTuReS O^ C*M€lC 

Sckobinoei^ Illinois' kesY flu- 
05 Ct\n*\s foK Lot. 6 



Rub-a-dub-dub, three men in a tub 
And who do you s'pose is here? 

A Delt and a Deke and a I'm Kap so meek, 
For the tub is just chuck full of beer. 



Hark, hark, that clever shark, 
Keller has left our town, 

We're in rags, 

Tatters and tags, 

And he's in velvet gowns 



*■*■ 



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"The girl I love is all my own," 

I HEARD YOUNG GOODMAN CRY. 
TlS SAD THAT HE COULD NOT HAVE KNOWN 

The Ann he loved was not her own, 
But was composed of rag and rone, 
And hanks of hair that girls are prone 
Of specialists to buy. 



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I CAN NOT SEE A SINGLE DEKE 

For dust, I can not see one, 
But I CAN TELL YOU any week, 
I'd rather see than re one. 



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"Mother — mother, see that couple, 

how they heave and how they sigh." 
"Hush, my daughter, it's just Betty 
■ Dancing with her Zeta Psi." 



Fee Fi Fo Fum, 

Cora Randolph's chewing gum. 

But never mind, when she is through 
It'll probably be the rag she'll chew, 
and i prefer the gum, dont you? 



L 



KAPPA SIG PLEDGES 

OR 

A Simple Case of Subtraction 

Ten little freshmen standing in a line. 

One jumped his pledge and then there were nine. 

Nine little pledges all had a date, 

One cot in trouble and then there were eight. 

Eight little freshmen, candidates for heaven. 

One played Joe Keller, then there were seven. 

Seven little prospects, heads hard as bricks, 

One flunked vet science and then there were six. 

Six little tartars in Queenie Danville's dive, 

Tommy Arkle found it out and then there were five. 

Five little neophites went oujt on a spree, 

two got pickeled and then there were three. 

Three little rough-necks went upon a rum, 

When the Kappa Sigs woke up — tough luck — they had none. 

551 



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YoiL,f)ill? 



H&RE, 




A&ppafc'-' Tl\eT&s>u.l& 



5litz, speeds 
'^hilarious <ky 
ir\ cemetery. 




An educative view, 

Showing the. G\TT>pu5 

Stout on iUway to pres!> 






5r\&pper,with 

KbcottewtrdiMrj 



Plo.yiT\^ With fMr*. 

THERE 



ir\ 1 902. 
one ofN 

foot-ball 
atender 
thestui e nt 
turnbirx 
rume the 

and one(') 
*5i4m&Nu, posing Capt. 

■ ! .tor the!" ^ oldm 



Thia picture vvdst&ker\ 
and. show* 

Keroe&at 
&$e. To 
who first 
the correct 
lllio offers' 
T<jtim& slips 
picture of- 




Wateon 




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more judgement in tokitv* 
people to.hold his watchf 



fears I lio wasn't ontime 




hteits'upa«s*dov\n\*> 



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THE 




Some of these crude printer-men 
ire no respecters of persons- Look 
Where we tounithe'Creom of the Co-eds 



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No. 

No. 



A Few Clubs that Have Sprung Up Within the Past Yeab 

;Niid}tinjail €Iub 

Mascot — fail Bird. 

Password— "N( )T GUILTY." 

Whistle — A few bars IN "Just For 

President — Paul Whitehead. 

President Emeritus — Pete Wright. 

Bail-IF — Ed Cavanaugh. 

I Ioxorary Member — Joe Ke ler. 

Sister in Villa Grove Callaboose 
Hod Trevelyan 
Faculty Members 
Gun Man — Maj. Webster 
Night Rider — Dean Clark 
Cell Mates 
No. 7743 — Dutch Schlueter No. 7748 — Johnny Silkman 

7744 — Butch Talbot No. 7749— Hank Ramey 

7745 — Mac Booze No. 7750 — George Hall 

No. 7746 — Pud Pinault No. 7751 — Dick Barler 

No. 7747 — Kike Searlls 

Minutes of the Previous Meeting 
November 15, 3 A. M. Meeting called to order in cell 19, Champaign Lock-up, 
by President Whitehead. Nearly all members responded to the roll call but 
Brother Keller, who being out of town was excused, and Brother Schlueter who, 
as Brother Talbert informed was detained in the Urbana chapter rooms. Brother 
Silkman proposed the name of Bart Macomber for membership in the club, but 
Brpther Barler objected on the grounds that Bart had once been known to pray 
during a football game and was therefore ineligible. Brother Hall asked to be 

excused to hunt a looking glass as his neck- 
wear was awry, but Sergeant-at-Arms Hud- 
nutt objected and the matter was dropped. 
On motion of Brother Pinault and through 
the kindness of Brother Cavanaugh the 
meeting was adjourned with the usual lock 
step ceremonies. 

^piritualistir €lnb 
Motto — College life is poison, booze its 
antidote. 

Mascot — A hog with its eves put out. 
President — Maj. Wki'.stkk. 
Members — Jack Krebs 

MURPH 

Wll ITKY 

Firebaugh 
|ack Griffin 
Psi U 

Frank Sterling 
I 'ledge— Ki ke Searles 
Arch Enemy — T. A. C. 




' 



/'resident Webster 



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Club 



ROYAL OXEN 



Perry O Graves 
Bart O Macomber 
Harold O Pogue 
Barrett O Rogers 
Orlie O Rue 
Bill O Kreiss 



Cap X Souier 
Steve X Birch 
Red X Gun kle 
Frank X Gardner 
Temple X Br ell 
Paul X Boston 



%\\t JVmeriratt ^n$mit #jxtt$tg 



Charter Members of 
Gene Schobinger 
Rube Markwardt 
Zeke Currier 
Joe Adams 
Frank Bane 
I Tomer Deakman 



the Illinois Chapter 

Ed Morrissev 
Pollv Adams 
Pat Penniwell 
Cap Souier 
Phil Armour 
Fat Buell 




MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING 

The meeting was called to order by President Currier, 
who called upon Secretary Gene Schobinger. He read 
a paper on "Brooding and Breeding." Ed Morrissev 
moved that PeYVee Buyers and Dean Clark be chloro- 
formed as dangerous to the race. Markwardt suggested 
that the Dean be left out as there were several other 
organizations around the campus that were planning on 
doing the same thing to him and besides. Phil 
Armour moved that Frank Bane be appointed to do the 
Brutus act on Buyers and also suggested that a me- 
morial shaft be erected in Crystal Lake park. Deakman, 
the chairman of the committee on "Mating and Matri- 
mony," reports that — More censor stuff. What chance 
has a poor Roast editor got? On motion of Frank 
Bane the meeting was adjourned with the usual exer- 
cises. 



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T. A. C. FAVORS HONOR 
SYSTEM 

At 10:48 yesterday A. M. Tommy 
punched the button that summons the 
trusty Eiero, 

"Ejmer, my hoy, have the class 
rooms been fitted with the latest type 
of concealed dictograph capable of re- 
cording the slightest whisper?" 

"They have, sir." 

"And have all the concealed cam- 
eras been placed with means for oper- 
ating them from a distance?" 

"Yes. sir." 

"And have the telescopes been in- 
stalled so as to command a view 
through the windows of every class 
room ?" 

"They have." 

"And is there now a private de- 
tective enrolled as a student in every 
class ?" 

"I believe there is." 

"Good. You may give the reporter 
a statement saying I am in favor of 
the Honor Svstem at Illinois." 



Miss "Girly" Miller of Champaign 
has accepted a bid to the Sigma Nu 
frat. Well, she was certainly rushed 
long enough. 



The Sigma Chi frat picture looks to 
us like a section of the East bleachers. 



It's rather old by this time, but it 
has occurred to us that the returns 
from the first semester Junior election 
were Hartless. 



We was talking to our fellow scribe, 
Seidenberg, last week, and he says that 
some people can't pass up a beggar on 
the street, hut he can, it's all in getting 
used to it. 



L 



We are happy to announce that Mr. 
Ilealy will again coach the Champaign 
high school football team next year 
and in addition will be an instructor 
in Algebra. Let X equal the un- 
known or location of Joe Keller. 



We wish we had a stand in with 
the Dean like Howard Walton thinks 
he has with his Alton girl. If conceit 
were consumption poor Abe would be 
on his way to Arizona by this time. 



If 15. Y. Lichter studied his school 
work as hard as he studies "How to 
Behave in Company", he would be a 
Phi Beta Kappa by this time. The 
part that gets us is that we have never 
seen him go anywhere. 



We was bid Commitatus last night, 
hut we'll be durned if we'll pay five 
dollars to make an ass out of our- 
selves. 



The local chapter of Zeta Beta Tau 
are now holding their meetings in the 
office of the Daily Illini, opening the 
same with full synagogue ceremonies. 



Society Note — Nig Healy has re- 
turned to his apartments in the Delta 
Tau Delta house after spending the 
winter in the bowling alley. 



We was walking down John street 
with Snapper the other day when a 
couple of co-eds got between us and 
the sun. Snapper remarked that he 
never did care to have them bowed, 
but we told him that any one who 
would look a gift horse in the mouth 
was no gentleman. 



550 



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'Slooey" Chapman "B" Copley 

'Hank" Ramey Jean Roberts 

Eddie Roos "Ecky" Linch 

' Baldv " Field Grace Flood 

Walter Buchen "Marth" Kyle 

'Dud" Crane Laura Bardwell 

Frank Judson Gladys Lovewell 

Phil Armour Margaret Marbold 

Bart Maccmeir Faith Swig-art 



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jffifiv~jHfet Club 



"Rube" Markwardt "B" Copley 

"Doc" Covey Jean Roberts 

"Bunny" Pagin "Ecky" Linch 

"Nick" Seidenberg Louise Amborn 

"Gardie" Rogers Gladys Lovewell 

Bill Pratt "Peachy" Andrews 

"Ken" Barber "Jack" Johnson 

"Gip" Davis Faith Swigart 



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(Companion to the "Henry George" organization) 

Song— "Off With the Old Love, On With the New.'' 
Motto — "There'll be another one along in a minute." 
President — Johnny Pagin. 
Vice-President — Pewee Byers. 

Fraters in Facilitate — i 

James Manley Phelps 
Clarence Eugene Noerenp.erg 



Fraters in Universitate- 

Eddie Wallace 
Doc Covey 
Birdie Kreigh 
Bill Jones 
Dutch Schleuter 



Jimmy Colton 
Gardie Rogers 
Wen McCracken 
Bill Robinson 
Raymo Denz 



leg-f ullcrs GHub 

Song — "If That's Your Idea — etc." 
Motto — "Free drinks at any cost." 
President — Salome Balkema 
Members — 

S. Balkema 

Sally B. 

S. B. 

Sally Balkema 

557 







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AND WE OUGHT TO BE 

THANKFUL FOR THAT 
If we didn't have rag dancing, 

That most ungodly sin, 
That ruins all our morals 

And makes the devil grin, 
If we didn't have some cribbers, 

(A fact deplorable) 
What chance would poor old Seidy 
have 

To keep his paper full? 

If politics were really straight 

Jf we had no sophomore ball, 
If all the S. A. E's left school 

Jt wouldn't do at all. 
For how could Arthur A. Odell 

With his band of henchmen true, 
Show the University, 

What a union, great, can do? 

And if we had no daily 

And no Y. M. C. A., 
If all the Kappa Sigs in school 

Should quickly pass away, 
If Col. Greene should go to war, 

And Casner fail to pass. 
Who at this great school of ours 

Would be the college ass? 




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/( e aippcd tins from the editor's sanctum, 
the day after the committee picked the beauti- 
ful women. Look under the scratches and you 
may find yourself among the near-beautiful. 



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Song written by Nig Healy on November 15, and put to a plaintive tune 
by Dug McRobie: 

"All the world seems dreary, 
All the skies are grey. 
Somehow things don't seem the same 
Since Keller went away. 

NO, THERE'S NO SENSE TO IT AT ALL 

but the censor has taken the heart right out of us and we've got to fill this space 
up with something. ^ 

\or^ Wa ^n dn , igh f ° f the yt ; ar 4044 , and the risin S sun was slowl y filing away in the 
\ orth. Suddenly from out this maelstrom staggered a meteorological manikin Whang 
whang, purred the shoe-lace and in accents disconsolate the hills re-echoed, Whang And 

so on toiled the long weary night. An eve for an eye 
and a tooth for a grape nut but soft words never 
turned away a bill collector nor in like manner was 
our hero to be turned away from his fell purpose. 
Buzz, Buzz, three times Buzz moaned the scrambled 
egg m muffled tones. Buzz, Buzz, four times Buzz. 
answered the steam shovel, but it was too late for 
'round about them rose the chickerous chinkel of 
a chapel chime chirping for its mate. In an instant 
it had all dawned upon him. Spring was less than 
twenty miles away and the gallant boys in blue would 
soon be living in glass houses. If' not, why not? 
For the life of him he could not tell. State three in- 
stances and give your reasons but the only response 
was a solitary jitney bus sorrowfully mumbling tit- 
willow, tit-willow, tit-willow. Hut the laundry bag 
understood and nodded its head in sympathy. ' Cur- 
few shall not spare that burning deck. The moral 
is clear. 
558 




Chapel chime chirping for its mate. 



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"Taxi" goes a -shimming. 

Sad thought for popular freshman 
girls — Look at Sally Halkema now. 

Friday and Saturday evening — No- 
body home but the Kappas and they're 
all in. 



He's just a slight acquaintance, says 
Zeke of Eddie. 



A Blackbird in a gilded cage — Phi Psi 
(Old Crow). 



Oh, Sarah, if your name were only 
Jack. 



Lives of great men all remind us, 
We should strive to do our best, 
And departing leave behind us 
Notebooks that will help the rest. 



Soror to Sis — "Did you go to the Kap- 
pa Sigma party last night?" 

"Oh dear, no, I had a bid to a cadet 
hop." 



Notorious Champaign Celebrities — 
Joe Keller and Snapper Belnap. 



Stone age stuff — Dean Kyle. 



559 




Maybe you hadn't heard about Prof. 
Carnahan's coming out party. 

SOME ENTHUSIASTIC SUP- 
PORTER OF RAPP SENT 
US THIS. 

Somewhere in this Uni 
Is a fellow that's called Rapp, 
And you'll know him, gentle reader, 
By his ever present cap. 
lie wears his "I" cap in the morn- 
ing. 
And his "I" chappeaux at night, 
Sports his "I" incrested derby 
When the dance is at its height. 
You can see it at the movies 
And the Orpheum first row, 
In fact where ever Rapp is bound, 
His "I" cap's sure to go. 








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"3% fart 2 Woulb flag in a War 

^cttoeen tlje Uniteo States anil 

(Hermann." 

By JOSEPH NATHANIEL 
GREENE 

This ,modest little pamphlet of some 
1400 pages recently issued by our well 
known student colonel is a stirring 
story of a dauntless, red-blooded 
hero, written by himself. The book 
has a very modest air to it for such a 
great man as Col. Greene, who can 
not help knowing that he holds a very 
prominent position in the world. He 
even goes so far as to admit that Gen. 
Joffre might make a valuable staff 
officer for him. Those who have 
seen Joe bully the frosh around on the 
South campus feel sure that he could 
make quick work of the Kaiser. 

1450 pgs. Illustrated. 16 mo. 
$4.00 net. 

"(Holleae juration ^ietoeo aa a |£ife 
Work." 

By the late 
ROSWELL FRANCIS FIELD 
This is a clever volume by a man 
who is universally recognized as an 
authority on the subject. He dis- 
cusses the subject under three head- 
ings. First, "Classes and School 
Work". The author's quaint and 
whimsical way of treating this head- 
ing has elicited interest if not praise 
from nearly every member of the col- 
lege community. Second, "Regular 
University Work" . Under this head 
ing he takes up frat life and frat cus- 
toms, enlarging on the lazy bohemian 
atmosphere of old Alpha Delta Phi. 
Bradley's Arcade as a sociability cen- 
ter is discussed, and several ingenious 
methods of inducing Cece to put a 
dime's worth of ingredients into a 
Mahomat Sundae are described. Plis 
third heading, "Women, and Their 
Refining influence on the Adolescent 
Youth" , is perhaps the most inspiring 
of the three. Space prohibits a com- 



561 



plete review of this section, but its 
chief innovation is a 14-page direc- 
tory of "Who's Who in Terre 
Haute"? 

308 pages. Illustrated. Cloth; net 
$175. 

"'poto to (Eononct ©ne's #clf at a 
J§>'ororittt |foitse. " 

By CHARLEY WEEMS 
This is by far the most complete 
book of its kind ever published and 
will be welcomed by university men 
throughout the country. Various 
methods of sponging a Sunday even- 
ing meal from a group of sorority 
women are taken up in detail and re- 
duced to a simplicity that is marvel- 
ous. No detail of etiquette, how- 
ever minute, is left out. An entire 
chapter is devoted to coy methods 
used in disposing of olive seeds after 
they have been peeled. 

An appendix is featured by a com- 
plete set of burglar plans for every 
sorority house in Champaign and the 
art of concealing hand-painted plates 
beneath the coat and table spoons 
within the vest pocket is expounded 
in the author's characteristically 
gripping style. 

189 pages. Cloth; net $1.25. 

"A ^isht in ^en $lar Jlooms." 

By WALDO SCHLEUTER 
Thrilling personal experience of a 
man who has seen the bottom of the 
pit. A strong temperance story. The 
book is headed by a full page picture 
of the author and this is a good tem- 
perance lesson in itself. A short help- 
ful bible quotation is placed below, 
which reads : What is always in dutch 
at the Pi Phi house? Ans. A Her- 
shey bar. What stronger lesson 
could we give the rising generation 
than this example of an erstwhile de- 
generate completely cured under the 
all refining influence. A good book 
on which to raise the children. 

200 pgs. Octavo. 12 mo. $1.50 net. 



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Cbe Sheldon School 



CHICAGO .^naw NEW VOSM 



HewYar* Oot. 2nd, 1814. 



Pogue, 
Candidate for the Football Tear, 
Unlveratty of Illlnola. 

Daai 311:- 

1 ploture bag been aant ma of you, taken 
from the Chloago "Tribune" of Monday, Sept. £9th; 
snd tbe queatlon hce baan asked, whether you ere 'my 
Son. ' 

I hare a Son. »ho «as • football player, 
end ha la pretty nearly aa ugly aa you ere. and baa 
that *aae mean, deyillah expreeelon aboat Ma mouth- 
but ha got out of the football game and aant Into ',/ • £T 
bualnaaa, end la maki ng a "oentoi ruah" at that. ,/»_ cu / <■ "t- 

1 would Ilka to knoa *ho yon ate, <na another 
you are any kin to ua. My Biotheia aie the Uwyera 

Pogue * Pogue of Clnolnnatl. 0., nherona I, aa you aeo 
an Vloe-Preeldent of e laige matltutlon. »lth head- 
quartera In Chicago. 

W *H 7»» kindly drop me a line, i.n<< plvo me 
aomothlng of your family and oereonel reo.id, <-a I ar 
Intereatad In all the Pogue-i. for the name baa alwiya a 
ateod everywhere, for that wbloh aaa beet.<y_2r < s J^n,^/, 

Wlahlng you the beat of the beat ^"every- 
thing, and euolaeing you a little card ahloh I hare 
laauad, 1 am 



Very faithfully youia. 

Iloe-freaidant. / 



■ xy xanni 



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Harold hears from a would-be relative, but he is only a school teacher. 



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^Interesting information 

There is a chapter of S. A. E. 
here. 



The Betas admit they have 
three good men in Murphy, Crebs 



ft facsimil, of *v/><?r Every five dollar bill has 100,000 
Re* Brawn senr hij germs on it. 

This makes little or no difference to the average stude. 

The president of the Pacific Coast Dish Washers' As- 
sociation is a college graduate, and 304 members iff the 
union are college-bred men. 

Hosteller may be able to get a job yet in spite of his 
diploma. 



■laea 



50 J 

5 



This is in me- 
moriam to Cup 
Davis. He 
hasn't died yet 
but he is too 
good to be 
true. Illinois 
never will be 
able to keep 
s u c h a great 
man and we 
feel sure that 
his stay with 
us will be short. 
A n y w a y the 
subject is a hit 
sad, so we place 
it in crepe. 



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Jfemtmts Jflrat Hells 

K2 
We need freshmen, 
Dig. Dig, Dig, 
Dig for dear old Kappa Sig. 

Ben 
Page Mr. Murphy, page Mr. Crebs, 
Hotel Beta, Raw, Raw, Raw, 
A room and a bath for a dollar and a half. 

Formal dances, evening clothes, 
Why we do it no one knows. 
Fnll dress pictures, string quartette, 
We may turn into a fraternity yet. 
Stick around we'll bid you to, 
Raw, Raw, Raw for Sigma Nu. 

ZBT 




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Finkelstein, Casner, Seidenberg, Block, 

Have you got anything that you'd like to hock? 

Cha hee, cha ha for the tennis team, 

It's made of Zeta Beta Taus, 

We'll drink long health to our bunch supreme, 

Order a beer with thirteen straws. 

X* 
Rah, Rah for the Lodge boys. 
The Chi Psi's are we. 
We're good at Wisconsin 
But here we're debris. 
h x* 

Chew tobaccer, chew tobaccer, 

Spit, spit, spit, 

We're the frat that makes a hit. 

Chew tobaccer, chew tobaccer, 

Splatter and splash, 

Chi Phi always cuts a dash. 

AKE 
We're the bunch with the rep, 
We're the bunch with the name. 
We may be cheap hicks 
But we're Dekes just the same. 
So why should we worry 'bout little detail, 
We're strong in the East, so we save up our kale. 
Nine Rahs for Gunkle, Three Rahs for Gip, 
One Rah for Sandy, We've all got the pip. 

A A* 

We got family, we got wealth, 

We don't need brains and we don't need health, 

Raw, Raw, Raw for Alpha Delt. 




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When the coke's all gone and it's nearly dawn. 

(Oh, you can't stay awake on a bet) 
And you've knocked all your friends, yet the thing never ends, 

And you've used up your last cigarette. 
Then a vision comes, of those good old bums. 

Now an angry, irate mob, 
And it strikes a chord and I groan "Oh Lord, 

Why did I take this job" ? 



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ffc*\t total cost of %\\t 1 9 1 li 
^*^ Jllio is approximately 
nine tlmusanb bollars* ®I}is 
makes eacb, book actually cost 
four Jlollars* ®l)e ^bnertisers 
mbose names appear on tlje fol- 
lominu, pa^es liaoc contributed 
fmo tljonsanb-finc ljunbrcb bol- 
lards tottrarb making tljis book 
possible* We bane tolb tljem tfjat 
yon appreciate tljeir support, 
anb tbat you mill reab tire Abuer- 
tisinu, Section. As yon reab tlte 
Roasts mlticb, yon mill finb 
mlrercner yon open tb,e section, 
glance for a minute at tuljat tlje 
,Abnertiscrs Ijaoe to say; 'lion 
mill finb it interesting reabinu,* 



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3litaex to Advertisers 



Page 

BAKERIES 

Third Street Delicatessen 627 

BANKS 

Citizens State Bank 588 

Trevett and Mattis Bank 604 

Urbana Banking Company 567 

BARBERS 

Geo. G. Brown 619 

Kandy 580 

C. L. Hoover 578 

BOTTLING WORKS 

Anheuser Busch Brg. Assn 631 

Champaign Bottling Works 612 

Illinois Parfay Company 626 

CEMENT AND BRICK COM- 
PANIES 

Chicago Portland Cement Co 618 

German American Portland Ce- 
ment Co 615 

Western Brick Co 629 

CLAY WORKING MACHINERY 

The American Clay Mach. Co 576 

C. W. Raymond Co 610 

CHEMICAL COMPANIES 

Dearborn Chemical Company 572 

CIGAR AND TOBACCO COM- 
PANIES 

Deisel Wemmer Co 592 

Lesure Brothers 631 

Frank P. Lewis Cigar Co 588 

Rock and Newman 590 

CLOTHIERS AND TAILORS 

A. Starr Best 616 

Brooks Brothers 583 

Chalottesville Woolen Mills 630 

Dockstader and Sandberg 569 

John W. Douglas and Co 587 

Gulick Tailoring Co 635 

J. M. Kaufman and Co 637 

Jos. Kuhn Co 646 

Fred G. Marshall 584 

E. R. Moore Co 623, 643 

Ogilvie and Henage 641 

Pitsenbarger and Flynn 643 

Jacob Reed's Sons 630 

Harry G. Smucker 628 

Shubart and Kichin 574 

E. Spence 601 

Stern Brothers 620 

Wilkie and Sellery 609 

R. E. Zombro 613 

COAL COMPANIES 

S. A. Sandweger 613 

R. A. Stipes 644 

Ilarris-Dillavou & Co 570 

CONFECTIONERS 

Bradley 627 

Harris and Mead 622 

COSTUME COMPANIES 

Rose Costume Co 588 

T. C. Schaffner ......629 

Fritz Schoultz and Son 601 

DRUGGISTS 
Oldham Brothers 639 

B. E. Spaulding 608 

Swannell and Son 611 

PHYSICIANS AND DENTISTS 
SUPPLIES 

American Cabinet Co 606 

V. Mueller and Company 573 

Ritter Dental Manfg. Co 586 

Sharp and Smith 581 

DECORATORS 

Bacon Brothers 638 

Williams Brothers 584 

DICTIONARIES 

G. and C. Merriam Co 581 

ELECTRIC SUPPLIES 
Commonwealth Edison Co. 602 



Page 

CONSTRUCTION ENGINEERS 
AND ENGINEERS SUPPLIES 

American Well Works 597 

H. Channon and Company 605 

Crofoot Neilson and Co 626 

English Brothers 625 

H. D. Hallet 591 

John Mohr and Sons 621 

Smith Totman Co 593 

Weller Manufacturing Co 595 

Western Wheeled Scraper Co 599 

FARM IMPLEMENTS AND 

SUPPLIES 

Aultman Taylor Machinery Co.. .577 

Columbia Quarry Co 597 

S. E. Dillavou 599 

Fairbanks Morse Co 615 

Hart Grain Weigher Co 638 

A. P. Dickey Co 592 

Johnson Field Machinery Co 613 

Polk-Geming-Polk Co 

FLORISTS 

E. S. Dodson 646 

Thos. Franks and Son 626 

Gus Johnson 587 

FURNITURE 

C. A. Kiler 572 

Percival and Morehead 601 

FOUNTAIN PENS 

American Fountain Pen Co 634 

L. E. Waterman 596 

GROCERIES 

Jello 568 

Eisner Grocery Co 640 

The James McCoy Co 635 

Palmer Brothers 

B. A. Railton 585 

HARDWARE 

Tohn H. Doyle 640 

HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS 

Auditorium Hotel 596 

Beardsley Hotel 578 

Bismarck Hotel 632 

Chesley and Co 629 

Hotel Cumberland 616 

Hof-Brau 642 

Inman Cafe 647 

Warick Hotel 633 

ICE CREAM, ICE, ETC. 

Champaign Ice Cream Co 575 

Chas. E. Mueller 573 

Twin City Creamery Co 611 

Twin City Ice and Cold Storage 

Company 598 

York Manufacturing Co 610 

INSURANCE 

Challis and Fischer 617 

New York Life 

F. K. Smedley 570 

INVESTMENTS AND LOANS 

Burnham and Harris 625 

F. G. Campbell 643 

G. F. Carson 643 

M. A. Kidder 607 

Francis J. Kilkenny 648 

Mercantile Trust Company 634 

Mississippi Valley Security Co. .585 

JEWELERS 

Jos. C. Bowman 638 

Ray L. Bowman 645 

Brochon Engraving Co 580 

The College Shop 639 

T. II. Craig 601 

The Kalo Shop 616 

J. F. Newman 590 

Spies Brothers 575 

Chas. A. Winship & Co 620 

Wuesteman 623 

LUMBER AND MILL WORK 

Alexander Lumber Co. 619 

P. 1). Foster 644 

566 



LAUNDRIES 



Page 

Empire Steam Laundry 592 

Model Laundry 645 

Soft Water Loundry 578 

White Line Loundry 583 

MILLINERS 
McWilliams and Gleim 648 

MONUMENT WORKS 

C. N. Clark & Co 640 

OIL COMPANIES 
Indian Refining Co 619 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

A. W. Abernathy 632 

Aristo 598 

Howard 600 

Photo Art Shop 647 

H. L. Renne 624 

B. A. Strauch 593 

Melvin H. Sykes 620 

PIANO COMPANIES 

Cable Piano Company 591 

H. I. Carpenter 611 

PLUMBERS AND PLUMBERS' 
SUPPLIES 

Apperson Reimer Co 646 

The Garlock Packing Co 607 

New York Blower Co 614 

Reliable Plumbing and Heating 
Company 599 

TRESSING 
Woodies Place 623 

PRINTERS, BINDERS AND 
ENGRAVERS 

The Bureau of Engraving 650 

Flanigan-Pearson Co 651 

G. R. Grubb 646 

Robert O. Law Co 649 

David J. Molloy Co 649 

Munhall Printing House 581 

SEEDS 

Champaign Seed Co 617 

Peterson Nursery 604 

The Wing Seed Co 569 

SHOES 

William Wallace Paul 648 

Swearingens 648 

STUDENT SUPPLIES 

The Co-op 582 

Chas. M. Higgins 607 

D. H. Lloyde 579 

SWEATERS 

Oakes Brothers 576 

TELEPHONE COMPANIES 

Central Union 622 

The Home Telephone Co 627 

TRANSPORTATION COMPANIES 
Detroit and Cleveland Navigation 

Company 603 

Goodrich Transportation Co 567 

Illinois Central R. R 605 

Illinois Traction System 608 

TRANSFER COMPANIES 

John F. Obyrne 572 

THEATRES 

Lyric Theatre 617 

Orpheum 637 

Park Theatre 

Princess Theatre 612 

TYPEWRITER COMPANIES 

L. C. Smith and Brothers 589 

UNDERTAKERS 

Enos II. Renner 611 

VETERINARY SURGEONS 

R. W. Braithwaite 599 

V. W. C. A. 
University V. W. C. A 594 




a= 



S glfams '* 



■■* 





3 per cent paid 


on time deposits 




The 


Urbana 


Banking 


Co. 


Capital $100,000 


Responsibility $1,000,000 




URBANA, 


ILLINOIS 





THE CALENDAR 

1914-1915 

Sept. 15 — A few of the early birds show up. The 
bootlegging business picks up. Tommy oils up the old 
bike. 

Sept. 19 — Bee Copley prophesies that the Thetas 
will be leading the league when pledge day rolls around. 
The rumor is denied by Sally Balkema. 
















Established 
1856 


Goodrich st r ip 


Winter and 
Summer 






t 

To all impo] 
way, the mone 

splendid stean 

It is a fores 
score of wont 
'Resorts and 1 

Goodrich 


The Only Year 'Rouru 
Great Lakes Service 

L'tant points on Lake Michigan. Trave 
y-saving is worth while, and we place 
isliips. Cabins and staterooms are hea 

VACATION GUIDES FREE 

iglit to plan your summer outings now 
lerfnl lake trips. Write for our ilh 
"Tips." 

Traticif Ta • Docks Foot Michigan k\ 
1 1 d 1151 1 LU«. City Office 58 W.Adams ! 


i 

1 the Goodrich 

it your service 
ted. 

. There are a 
istrated foldei 

£ Chicago 





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"The 



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"Talk about housekeeping being hard! Wish I never had anything harder to do 
than this getting my own meals for a day or two while Helen's away. " 

Poor man! He doesn't realize that "Helen" planned everything for him, and that 
the Jell-O dessert he is making is the only dessert which inexperienced man could make. 
Suppose he had to cook on a hot stove in a hot kitchen. 




desserts do not have to be cooked and anybody can make them. For this reason and 
because they are exquisitely flavored and delightfully satisfying, they are the best possible 
desserts for any day and every day. 

There are seven pure fruit flavors of Jell-O : 
Strawberry, Raspberry, Lemon, Orange, Cherry, 
Peach, Chocolate. 

Each 10 cents a package at any grocer's. 

The new Jell-O book is a real Kewpie book, 
with pictures ol Kewpies by Rose O'Neill hersell. 
If you desire one and will write and ask us for 
it we will send it to you free. 

THE GENESEE PURE FOOD CO., Le Roy, N. Y., and Bridgeburg, Can. 

The natnejELL-Oison every package in big red letters. 
Be sure you get Jell-O and not something else. 

568 





A PACKAGE 



JJ 




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Illinois * 



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Catering Especially to 
College Men 

Dockstader 
& Sandberg 

Ready for Service 

Clothes 

8th Floor Republic Building 

Chicago 



Our customers extend through every large 
University in the middle west. 



Sept. 21 — Registration. The wise freshmen line up eight deep at eight 
o'clock trying to get in Sadie Harbarger's rhetoric section. 

Sept. 22 — Second day of registration. Many prominent engineers register 
in the Business School at the last minute. 

Sept. 23 — Otto Seiler blew into town. The Alpha Delts were rushing, how- 
ever, so Otto had to put up at the Noonan Hotel. Tough-Guy Waterman meets 
Tough-Guy More ( from Danville, you know ) and they swear eternal friendship, 
"which no man shall part". 



Wing's Quality vSeeds 

For Field and Garden 

ALFALFA 

Dakota Nebraska Grimm Siberian 

Send for our catalogue describing all the new strains of Al- 
falfa, our own improved strains of Corn, Soy Deans, Vetch and 
Melilotus, and our superior Garden and Flower Seeds. 
THF WING SEED CO. 

MECHANICSBURG, OHIO. 



Dept. I. 



569 



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During the past five years the 

Northwestern 

Mutual Life Insurance Company 

OF MILWAUKEE 

has issued more than ONE MILLION DOLLARS INSURANCE on the lives 
of Faculty Members and students of 

The University of Illinois 

More than half of this great amount of insurance was written for STUDENTS 
These policy holders are scattered all over the world and constitute the 
best advertisement for this great Insurance Company. 

NORTHWESTERN POLICIES ARE BEST AND COST LESS THAN 
OTHERS— "Do not buy imitations". 



University Agency 

Co-Op. Building 

C. T. McCULLY 
PHIL F. ARMOUR 

Bell Phone 2444 

Auto 1020 



District Agency 

First National Bank Building, 
Champaign, 111, 

FRANK R. SMEDLEY 
District Agent and Field Superintendent 

Bell Phone 1206, 193 
Auto 1041 



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Sept. 24 — Dean Babcock made his usual speech on Scholarship to the Delts, 
hut as this was only the second day of school he could get but very few of the 
brothers to attend classes. 

Fund is donated to provide separate building for the School of Music. 
Thank the Lord for small favors, says the inmates of Uni Hall. 

Sept. 25— Big theft. Watson stole the echo from the Auditorium and put 
it in the new armory. 



L 



HARRIS-DILLAVOU & COMPANY 



Faculty and 
Fraternity 
Business 
Solicited 



MAKITAN 

iSC0AL§Fl 



Guaranteed Coal 

Guaranteed Service 

Guaranteed Satisfaction 



Yards and Office in Champaign and Urbana 



570 



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"They are not built o! pieces and they cannot go to pieces" 




The World's Tallest Silo— 16x108 ft. 
A POLK SYSTEM STRUCTURE 



POLK 

SYSTEM 

SILOS 



American farmers have gone SILO- 
SANE. When they were refusing 
to build silos, — when they were ex- 
perimenting with little, low, ram- 
shackle, tumble-down silos, full of 
angles and cracks and regrets — then 
they were SILO-MAD. 



Today there are two kinds of Ameri- 
can farmers, silo-wise farmers and 
other-wise farmers. The silo-wise 
farmers are steadily demanding tall, 
substantial silos, built of everlasting 
monolithic concrete ; for they know 
that PERMANENT EVER-SER- 
VICEABLE STRUCTURES ARE 
TRULY ECONOMICAL. The other- 
wise farmer is getting along with — 
well, too extravagantly to get very far. 

YOUR FARM will not be fully 
equipped until it boasts a POLK 
SYSTEM SILO, or a battery of them. 
The only difference between a POLK 
SYSTEM SILO and ETERNITY is 
that the POLK SYSTEM SILO has 
a beginning. 

Polk-Genung-Polk Co., 

FORT BRANCH, INDIANA 

"It Renders the Service" 



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Dearborn 
Chemical Company 

Treatment for Boiler Waters as per Analysis 

Operators of Analytical Laboratories 

Complete Analysis of Water 

Physical Testing and Analysis of Lubricating Oils 

Complete Analysis of Fuels 

Miscellaneous Analytical Work 



McCormick Building, 

ROBERT F. CARR, President 



Ch 



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Furniture of Style 
and Character 

Well made by first class 
workmen, gives satisfaction 
for many years. That's 
the kind we sell. 

We frame pictures and sell 
Rugs and Linoleums as well 

C. A. KILER 

24-26 Main St. CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 



Stoltey's 
Garage 



Successors to 
Herrick & Stoltey Garage 



For Service call a 

Brown Limousine 

or Taxie 



Auto 1 543 



Beil 187 



572 



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V. Mueller and Company 

Makers of Instruments 

for the Specialist in every branch of Medicine and Surgery 

Apparatus for the relief of deformities, Sick 
Room Supplies, Hospital Furniture and 
Equipment, X-Ray and laboratory appa- 
ratus. 



1171-1781 
Ogden Avenue 




CHICAGO 



*"»0E Mt&* 



1 



Sept. 26 — First Saturday of the school year. Joe Adams says the chicken 
crop is the lightest in years. Helen Trevellyan comes up from Villa Grove 
to help the Pi Phis tie a couple of rushees to the mast. 

Sept. 2/ — Kappa Sig report that fifteen freshmen had been pledged by this 
day, 9:34 p. m. Batting average for number of hits out of times at bat .782. 

Sept. 28 — Seidenberg gets up enough nerve to walk home with Louise 
Amborn, the Woman's editor. 



L 



Transfer, Moving, Shipping and Storage 

We do Packing of Household Goods for Shipment. 
Estimates Cheerfully Given. 
Packing Boxes of all kinds for sale. 

COAL AND KINDLING 

Chas. E. Mueller 

120 S. Neil Street 

Champaign, Illinois 



Bell Phone 972 
Auto Phone 2139 



573 



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Eugene Shubart Frank D. Kichin 

■ 

| ^fmbart anb 3&ict)in 

Tailors 



63 East Monroe Street CHICAGO 



SUITS 

from $40.00 Upward 



Overcoats from $45.00 Upward 



Telephones: 
Central 46 1 5 Automatic 61814 



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SPIES BROTHERS 

Manufacturing Jewelers & Stationers 

27 E. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 

JEWELRY FOR FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

Class Stationery, commencement caps 
and graduation gowns. 



THETA NU EPSILON & COMPANY 

POLITICAL BROKERS 

We guarantee any office in Sophomore Class. Student Union Offices also dealt in. 
Dutch Schlueter, Manager. Doc. Covey, Ladies' Representative. 

Eddie Block, Treasurer. 



Cranks on Sanitation 



The Champaign Ice Cream Company are "Sanitation" cranks. To begin 
with, they built their own sanitary factory. Just any old building wasn't 
good enough for them, so they had to have one made to their particular 
order, fitted with their own particular machinery and apparatus for produc- 
ing strictly sanitary and absolutely clean Ice Cream. 

In all this they have succeeded. A model plant is theirs and their product 
is everything that could be desired. 

The 

Champaign Ice Cream Co. 

Champaign, Illinois 



575 



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Sept. 29 — Nig Healy and George 
Richmond buy senior hats in order 
to be distinguished from the fac- 
ulty. 




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For Comfort, Style and Durability 

ask for 

Oakes Bros. Sweaters 

Made from Highest Grade Worsted Yarn. 
Sold by RALPH JONES, at the Athletic Department 



576 



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FARM THE AULTMAN-TAYLOR WAY 

IT'S THE CHEAPEST WAY-THE EASIEST WAY-THE BEST WAY 

You, in order to carry out your plans of scientific farming, will need the services 
of a farm tractor of the first quality. You should know that the horse to the scientific 
farmer of today no longer holds first place as a prime mover on the farm His cost 
his inefficiency, his limitations, place him in the back ground as an economical factor 
on the farm. The Aultman-Taylor Gasoline-Kerosene Tractor is the power behind 
successful farming today. No other tractor can give you such entire satisfaction- 
no other tractor is so ideally adapted to the power needs of the farm. You can plow 
at just the right time and do a better job than is possible with horses. You can sow 
when conditions are ideal. You can reap when your crops should be gathered You 
can haul your crops to market when prices are most attractive. All this and a thousand 
other power jobs about the farm can be done better, cheaper and with more satisfaction 
and less worry than with any other available power. You'll want to know more about 
the Aultman-Taylor way of farming— it's the modern, money-making way. 

Aultman-Taylor Gas Tractors 

Built in two sizes, 25-50 hp., 30-60 hp. 

insure bigger and better crops, less expense in raising them— less hard work The 
Aultman-Taylor Gas Tractor is no experiment. It's worth has been proven on 
thousands of farms throughout the United States and Canada. The Aultman-Taylor 
Gas Tractor in the 1912 Winnipeg Contest won highest honors. Records made and 
established in this competitive test have never been anywhere near approached by 
any other tractor since that time. Aultman-Taylor Gas Tractors use Gasoline, Kero- 
sene or Distillate with remarkable economy and efficiency. They make good everywhere. 
Catalog' on Request -Write for Copy Today 

The Aultman-Taylor Machinery Company 

MANSFIELD, OHIO 

BRANCHES: Indianapolis, Ind. ; Decatur, 111.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Kansas City 
Mo; Wichita, Kansas; Lincoln, Nebr. ; Great Falls, Mont.; Portland 
Spokane, Wash.; Calgarv, Alta. ; Regina, Sask., Can 



Ore.; 



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\Af\f\ \/C D'C WE STUDENTS CHOICE 

nUUVLIX D Sanitary Barber Shop 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG., CHAMPAIGN 



THE SOFT WATER LAUNDRY 

URBANA, ILLINOIS 
A. A. NYBERG, Manager 



ALPHA DELTA PI 

(SORORITY) 

Wishes to announce that they will not live up to the Pan-Hellenic Rule prohihiting 

the SERVING OF REFRESHMENTS at Open House. They 

guarantee satisfaction. Your patronage is always appreciated. 

Our Motto: 

Men at Any Cost 



Notice 



The HOTEL BEARDSLEY is now operated on the 

EUROPEAN PLAN 

With American Plan Meals in Connection 

Guests occupying rooms will be entitled to meals at 50c each, as desired. 

Those wishing meals without rooms will be charged 75c as heretofore. 

Price of Sunday meals not changed -still 75c. 

ROOM RATES WILL BE FROM $1.00 UP 

Beardsley Hotel Company 



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DURING THE PAST 

40 /EARS 



OVER 



32,000 PERSONS 

HAVE BEEN CONNECTED WITH THE 

University of Illinois 

EITHER AS STUDENTS, FACULTY MEMBER OR|EMPLOYEE, 
AND HAVE ALL BEEN FAMILIAR WITH 

LOYDES 



TWO STORES. 



DURING ALL THESE YEARS THEY HAVE BEEN 'ON THE 
JOB" AND HAVE TRIED TO SERVE THIS VAST ARMY OF 
CUSTOMERS FAITHFULLY, HONESTLY AND IMPARTIALLY- 
THEIR EVER INCREASING BUSINESS BEARS TESTIMONY 
TO THE FACT THAT THEY ARE "MAKING GOOD." 

THANKING THEIR PATRONS OF THE PAST FOR THEIR 
HEARTY SUPPORT AND WELCOMING THOSE OF THE FU- 
TURE, THEY WILL CONTINUE TO OFFER THE VERY 
BEST TO BE HAD IN PIANOS TO RENT OR SELL; BOOKS, 
TEXT, FICTION AND BLANK; KODAKS AND PHOTOGRAPHIC 
SUPPLIES: MUSIC BOOKS, FOLIOS AND SHEET; TYPEWRITERS 
TO RENT OR SELL; OFFICE SUPPLIES, SECTIONETTES; TALKING 
MACHINES, EDISON AND VICTOR; STATIONERY AND STAMPING; 
ATHLETIC GOODS, ARTISTS' MATERIALS, PENS, DEVELOPING, PRINT- 
ING, ENLARGING, FRAMING, MIMEOGRAPHS, ETC. 

ILLINOIS PENNANTS AND SOUVENIRS 

7 Main Street CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 606 E. Green Street 

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^BROCHON" 

^Dance ^Programs 



5 So. Wabash Ave. 



Chicago 



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Sept. 30 — Jack Bradley says that every freshman from St. Louis who can 
stand up to the bar and drink over four quarts of beer is now wearing an S. A. E. 
pledge button. 



Oct. 1 — First issue of the Siren comes out. Noticeable absence of Buck 
Ramsey's beauty section. 



KA ND Y \S— 9 Chairs— Sanitary Barber Shop, Largest in TwinjCities 



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614. EAST GREEN ST. 




AUTO. 2265 



580 



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SHARP <fe SMITH 

Makers and Importers of 

Surgical and Veterinary Instruments 
Hospital Supplies Manicure Instruments 

Elastic Stockings and Supporters 
Artificial Limbs Trusses 

Deformity Apparatus, Shoes, etc. 

Catalogs of any of the above Goods sent postpaid on request. 

155-157 North Michigan Blvd. 

Three Doors North of Randolph Street 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Established 1844 



Incorporated 1904 



MUNHALL 
PRINTING 
HOUSE 



17 Taylor Street 
CHAMPAIGN 



Society & Business 
Printing & Embossing 

Always the Newest 
and Latest 



£ « 



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I Webster* 
1 New International l 

| -TheMerriahWebster | 

jg Even as you read this publication you likelv H 

= question the meaning of some new word. A = 

= friend asks: "What makes mortar harden?" = 

= 5^ s „eek the location of Loch Katrine or the = 

= Ru - n ^S- C ^S-r 0n ,-2 f JvJ't'u. What is white coal" = 

= This NEW CREATION answers all kinds of 3 

= questionsin Language, History, Biographv, Pic- = 

= tion, Foreign Words,Trades, Arts and Sciences, = 

= with final authority. = 

§ 400,000 WordsandPhrasesDefined. = 

= 2700 Pages. 6000 Illustrations. 

= Cost $400,000. 

§1 The only dictionary with 

= the new divided page. 

S characterizedas "A Stroke 
= of Genius." 

^ Write for speei 

= men pap< s.illus- 

== trationB, etc. 

= Mention this pub- 
=^ lication and 

= receive FREE a 
=; set of pocket 
== maps. 

I G. & C. 

| MERRIAM 
| CO., 

H Springfield, 

s ^«»iiitiiiiioniiiiiHiiiii»jiiii"iiTiTTiTiiiiTmniiiiiiiiiimnn 




581 



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^ : :..........J 8 j£/> «- r .-nrs: 

Sixteen Years of 
j Successful Selling 

Those sixteen years have taught 
us the requirements and desires 
of college men and women. 

^ To serve you who are unable 
to visit our shop and select your 
purchase personally we have es- 
tablished a mail order depart- 
ment which offers you the same 
advantages as those enjoyed by 
our daily customers. 

CJ It is at your service. 

May we Serve You ? 

jJie\J .of I. Supply Store 

CHAMPAIGN 
cA - Store - for - Service 

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White Line Steam 

Laundry 



M. G. Snyder & C. A. Tufts 

Corner Neil and Washington Streets 
CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 



Bell Phone 406 



Auto Phone 1550 



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Oct. 3 — Sorority pledge day. Pi Phi's and Theta's make trade, Autha goes 
Pi Phi and Alice accepts Theta. Chorus of Alpha Chi's, "And we all thought so 
much of Miss Andrews." 

Oct. 4 — First open house. "I say, Pill, where'd ye get the new hat." Cora 
at last hooks a steady. 



ESTABLISHED 1818 




BROADWAY cor. TWENTY-SECOND ST. 

NE.W YORK. 



Boston Branch: 
I 49 Tremont Street 




583 



Clothing and Furnishing Goods 

Ready-made and 

to Measure 

Hats, Shoes, Sporting and 

Travelling Kits 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue 

Newport Branch: 
220 Bellevue Avenue 



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a ^ 8 tfuiruvs a- i s: 

Illinois House Managers 

Why not let us do your House Decorating? 

Quality Fir6l 

LET US FIGURE YOUR WORK 

WILLIAMS BROS. 



Bell 278 



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College Men 



know "what's what." They know 
the latest quips and turns of 
Fashion. They know what they 
want and they also know the way 
to get clothes which fit and satisfy 
is to have them tailored. 

A. E. Anderson andCo. 

Tailors Chicago 

make garments so they will be all 
that is desired in style — fit — work- 
manship. 

Their assortment of woolens for 
the Spring and Summer of 1915 
is large and contains the up-to- 
date mixtures so much desired 
this season — as well as the always 
attractive blues and blacks. 




FRED G. MARSHALL 

TAILORING AND FURNISHINGS 
Bradley Arcade Champaign, Illinois 



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rot B 1 1 1 KSSBBSre 

SP: S»J$iS33i BBS 



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Farm Mortgages 

MISSISSIPPI VALLEY SECURITIES CO. 

MAYER BUILDING 

Peoria, Illinois 



All Sigma Chis Attention 

The first Tuesday in every month has been set aside for 
A CHAPTER REUNION 

Come and meet the Freshmen. Many of them do not know you. Try to call 

them by their first names. 

THE CHAPTER HOUSE IS LOCATED AT 410 EAST JOHN STREET 



Telephones, Private Exchange all Depts. 
Superior, 7970, 7971, 7972, 7973, 7974 Automatic 32-332 



B. A. Railton Co. 

Wholesale Grocers 

373-405 West Erie Street 
CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



Fraternities, Sororities, Schools, Institutions supplied at wholesale prices 
Coffee Roasters, Importers, Manufacturers 



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COLUMBIA 

"A WORLD OFFERS HOMAGE TO THEE" 



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I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 

Like the flag of this Nation, you will find 
the output of our factory meeting with 
praise and popularity all over the universe. 

When we selected the name COLUMBIA for our product, 
we established a standard that represented the "top-notch" 
quality, and it has always been and always will be our 
constant aim to maintain this degree of excellence. 

IDEAL COLUMBIA CHAIR 

COLUMBIA ELECTRIC ENGINE 

COLUMBIA ELECTRIC LATHE 

COLUMBIA AIR COMPRESSOR UNIT 

represent equipment of the highest standard. The material, workman- 
ship, adaptability and finish of these articles have brought them world- 
wide popularity, evidenced by their universal use. 

There will be frequent opportunities presented for seeing the above 
product demonstrated, and we trust that everyone will avail himself of 
the same. 

We shall be pleased to send our catalog upon request. 

THE RITTER DENTAL MFC CO. 

ROCHESTER, N.Y 

PHILADELPHIA, MORRIS BUILDING 

NEW YORK. FIFTH AVENUE BUILDING 

CHICAGO, MARSHALL FIELD & CO ANNEX 

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 




I 



WHAT HO! DENTAL STUDENTS! 

THIS PAGE IS FOR YOUR PERUSAL 



THE RITTER DENTAL MFG. CO. 
ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



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Carnations 



decorations 



GUSJOHNSON 

Jflortgt 



306 East Springfield Abenue 
Champaign. Illinois 

Thones— cAuto 1471; 'Bell M79 



Oct. 5 — Kap Sig secretary, Bert Spalding, reports deficit of $200, whereupon 
after seven bids were extended, two more freshmen were pledged. Watch the 
hand on the dial. 

Oct. 6 — Two new 32 candle power lights installed on the Chi O porch. 
"Shucks, that ain't no remedy." Delta Gamma enters Pat McCall in all-round 
meet. 

Oct. g — Husband out for Senior prex, Co-eds all for him. Polly and Joe 
take dinner at the Beardsley. Adams is a good old name, why not keep it ? 



John W. Douglas 



Peter Neifing 



JOHN W. DOUGLAS CO. 

«_ Tailors _ 

Randolph 1363 "*" Monroe Streets 

406-408 North American Building 
CHICAGO 



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A. M. Burke, Pres. E. I. Burke, Vice-Pres. C. LJMaxwell, Cashier 



' 



Cbe Gitt3en$ 
State Bank 



Your business is desired and we are 
disposed to grant you every consis- 
tent favor. 



Neil and Taylor Streets 



CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 




fc 




A Fresh 

Hand-Made 

5/ Cigar 

Extra quality 

tobacco. 

It's a mild, 

fragrant 

smoke. 



Phone 7874 

Rose Theatrical Costume Co. 

116-18 North State Street 

Opposite Marshall Field & Co. 

CHICAGO 

ELEUANT NEWLSTOCK OF 

Masquerade and Theatrical Costumes 
TIGHTS, WIGS and MAKEUP 

Costumes of any description made to order 
on short notice. Amateur play costumes a 
specialty. Full Dress Suits,' for rent or sale. 
Estimates on novel interior decorations so- 
licited. 



588 



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Typewrite 
Your Notes 



How many times a college graduate is heard to exclaim — "If I only had 
copies of my notes under Prof. -." 

Why hasn't he? Because he has no typewriter with which to put them 
into proper shape. After two or three years, he cannot remember the work 
his notes mentioned and in disgust he throws them away. 

Non-collegians often ask "What good does a college course do?" On 
the defensive, the graduate has to admit that he has forgotten almost all he 
learned in college, but takes refuge in asserting generalities about culture, 
mental training, etc. 

Now suppose the student writes notes on a typewriter and retains 
carbon copies of them for future reference. In the first place, he gains 
the confidence of his college professors by going at his college course in a 
workmanlike manner. He submits his essays and theses in neat, typewritten 
manuscript. He receives higher marks than the man who hands in illegible, 
hand-written matter. 

The L. C. Smith & Bros, typewriter is the favorite with college students, 
because it is easy to operate and durable. It has ball bearings at all points 
where friction tends to develop. 

No matter what your future work in life may be, the knowledge of how 
to run a typewriter will prove of great benefit. 

NOW IS THE TIME TO START RIGHT. 

L. C. SMITH & BROS. TYPEWRITER CO. 



123 N. Wabash Ave. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



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Bowling 

for 
Stomach 

Fag 



Both for Mixtures 

The Men who'make the 
Wheels Go Round 

ROCK 6 NEWMAN 



J. F. NEWMAN 



OFFICIAL 



College Fraternity 
Jeweler 




MANUFACTURER 
OES1GNER IMPORTER 



1 1 JOHN ST. NEW YORK 

Branches: 
Chicago and San Francisco 



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WHAT THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY SAYS ABOUT 




DISTILLED WATER 

"Both the chemical and bacteriological examinations indicate that this 
water (ice) is perfectly safe for drinking purposes. The bacterial results 
show the sample to be sterile. — Signed, Edward Bartow, Director State 
Water Survey: 

Twin City Ice and Cold Storage Co. 

Corner Washington and Market Sts. 

Sec.-Treas., J. C. Dodds.'86 



590 



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H. 


D. HALLETT 


Consulting Engineer and Contractor 




LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 58 






Aurora, Illinois 


MEMBER 


iljl 






WESTERN 




r Wm/i i _ m« 


RAILROAD. 


SOCIETT 




HBiivVi|HHH^Ktt£|,I)\ ■ ?■ ■ 


HYDRAULIC, 


CIVIL 
ENGINEERS 


* ^fe% 


iff^maS^S 


ELECTRICAL 

AND 


ILLINOIS 
CIVIL 




s&fiftH^STi/ *!•—*-> " 


SANITARY 
ENGINEER. 


ENGINEERS 






ING A 


AND 
SURVEYORS 


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.. 


SPECIALTY 








\ 











Oct. 17— JUNIOR ELECTION. Crane promised to take Laura Bardwell 
to Prom and to give Lil Thompson a Junior Prom Committee job, thereby 
winning from Hart, who only held out a KEG PARTY. The old school is 
certainly getting sissified. 




The World's Highest Priced and Best Piano. The choice of 
the World's Greatest Artists. 

For sale only at the warerooms of the 

f ^aMe Plana [^omfiamf 

Wabash and Jackson CHICAGO 



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DICK EY MILL 



*** 



THE CELEBRATED A. P. DICKEY FARM FANS 
NEED NO INTRODUCTION 




The unsurpassed 
record made by 
these mills for the 
past 60 years has 
given them a 
world-wide reputa- 
tion for their sim- 
plicity, strength, 
ease of operation 
and great cleaning 
capacity. 

Send for circu- 
lars and net prices 
to first one where 
we have no agent 
selling them. 



A. P. DICKEY MFG. CO., Racine, Wis. 

STUDENTS! PATRONIZE THOSE WHO PATRONIZE YOU 

Telephones: Home 1392, Bell 748 

EMPIRE STEAM LAUNDRY 

SHAW 6 PLOTNER BROTHERS, Props. 
109-U West University Avenue 

BUNDLE, FLAT AND FAMILY WASHING 



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"For Gentlemen of Good Taste" 

SAN FELICE 
EL VERSO 

On Sale at all Dealers 
The DeiselWemmer Co., Lima, O., Makers 



592 



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Our Fortifications Consist of Quality and Service 

Heat and Cold Insulating Contracts executed 
throughout the United States 

SMITH-TOTMAN COMPANY 

Chicago 



L.W.REESE 

Will confer with applicants for 1916 Illini Positions 

from 3 till 4 every Tuesday. 

If yon do not believe that I will be the next EDITOR, ask ME. 



M 

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MAIL SERVICE 



MailS 



ervice 



Wherever you are, a stamp will bring your fiilm to 
us. Our best work will be returned promptly, 
postpaid. Get our rate book. 

Strauch Photo-Craft House 

625 Soutb Wright Street, Champaign 

CAMPUS SCENES FOR FRAMING 



MAIL SERVICE 



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The Young Women's 
Christian Association 



OF THE 



University of Illinois 



What the Y. W. C. A. has 



Room and Board Accommodations for 40 girls 

Assembly Room 

Reading and Social Rooms 

Committee Rooms 

Bowling Alleys 

Offices 



YOUR SUPPORT WILL BE APPRECIATED 



Address the Secretary Y. W. C. A. 

801 South Wright Street, Champaign, III. 

594 
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Oct. 21 — Entire house sold out for "Our Wives" when the Mini announces 
"Our Wives Seats for Sale." Several special requests for blondes. 

Oct. 22 — The Democratic smoker gave "Political" Rat, pardon me, Rapp, a 
chance to have a few oral hemorrhages. 

Oct. 23 — The Betas have at last learned to tell the Doty twins apart. One 
of them has gone to the bad tho, as she was seen with Wallie Frazer. 

Oct. 24. — The Athletic Board reopened the competition for managers as there 
was one Phi Gam who was not out working for the honor of the old frat. 



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WELL ER-MADE 




CONVEYING MACHINERY 

For handling crusher-run stone or ore. 
or talcum powder, or any material between 
these extremes. 



ELEVATING MACHINERY 

For handling any kind of fine or coarse material in bulk 
or in packages. 

Our buckets range in size from 2"x2" up to buckets 84" 
wide and 36" pitch, 

Complete systems for any purpose. 





POWER TRANSMISSION 
MACHINERY 

Complete systems for handling power 
economically to any number of individual 
machines or groups, by means of belts, ropes, 
chains, gears, etc. 

Send for Friction Clutch Catalogue 1-27 — 
General Catalogue 1-20. 

WELLER MFG. CO., 

Chicago 



595 



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Jivoid Substitutes X ^rS^ Booklet on Request 

Once fitted to your hand, pens of this make will do your writing for a lifetime. 

The variety of points and actions to he had in Waterman's Ideals is the greatest 

factor in fountain pen satisfaction. You never have to dip this pen to write. 

Sold Everywhere fay the Best Dealers 

E.. Waterman Company 173 Broadway, New York 




Automobile Furnished 

FAITH AND ALTA SWIGERT 

Agree to relieve their LOVERS of the expense of hiring a taxi for University 

Parties. Electric equipped 



Automatic 1306 



With Hard Tires. 
CALL ANYTIME 



Bell 306 



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When You Come to CHICAGO 

Wliy not stop at a hotel where you can have every convenience, 

he comfortable and first class at popular prices. 



Stop at the 



AU DITORI UM 



Known the 



irld 



On Michigan Avenue, Chicago's most attractive boulevard. Unobstructed view of (Irani Park and 
Lake Michigan. Unrivalled as a Summer and Winter hotel. Within live minutes' walk of the 
Federal Building, the leading theatres, and business center. Recent improvements made at a cost 
exceeding $300,000. 

Cuisine and service unexcelled. 
ROOM RATES 
Single Room for one person, $1.50, $2.00 and $2.50 per day. 
Double Room for two persons, $_'.50. $3.00 and $4.00 per day 
Single Room with hath for one person, $.'.50, $.1.00. $3.50 and $4.00 per day 
Double Room with hath for two persons, $4.00, $5.00 and $b.00 per dav. 
AUDITORIUM HOTEL, Michigan Blvd., Chicago. W. S. SHAFER, Manager 



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Pumps of Quality 




For nearly half a century "American" 
pumps have been noted for their quality, 
efficiency and reliability. 

"American" centrifugal pumps meet 
the widest range of pumping conditions, 
for the reason that they are built in 
types to meet every condition of service, 
instead of attempting to adapt location 
to a single type of pump. Catalog 132 
describes them. 

"American" deep well plunger pumps 
have been the standard in this type of 
pump for many years. Described in 
Catalog 130. 

Write for these catalogs. 

The American Well Works 

General Office and Works: 
Aurora, 111., U.S.A. 

Chicago Office: First National Bank 
Building' 





BUMPER 
-Must Be Fed As 



CROPS 
'Well As Bred 



<■ N °. Ti"^ , h °j • go0d th< L seed ' "° crop can ever be a success without a "balanced-soil-feed- 
ration. Most land is too acid— too sour— and sour land gives just about as much nourishment to 

"i ; olL?MB IV' aS r| (» r jNn lOTSTor 1 !* b0yS ' > Many S ° llS " eed °" ly the dght amount of 
rTMmniJr GROUND LIMESTONE to ra 1Se bumper crops. "COLUMBIA" GROUND 
UMhSlONt corrects the acidity of the soil and improves mechanical condition. Don't make the 
mistake of using Qutck-Lime or Ilydrated-Lime, because, while they correct acidity they also burn 
out the manure and other organic matter and destroy nitrogen. Putting 

"COLUMBIA" Ground Limestone 

into your soil is like putting money in the bank— it's a sure dividend producer. It assures strong 

in oYtn 5 that be " e '; , r f S1St 'K at - tacks ° f insects and « erm Pests-and heavier yield of clean,' 
sound held crops, vegetables and fruits. ' 

Alfalfa, Clover, Cow Peas or other legumes cannot be successfully raised on sour or acid soil 

wheat and note h™ T\ Gr ° U " d Limestone the " " la "' V™ 'egumes and follow them up with 
wneat ana note the remarkable crop increase. 

or n^ O V^T'TTMmi" r 1 | t r,TTST^ er r?l^ t i , ^^S e ar0und with °"t positive knowledge as to whether 
yield Linger ci^ps GROUND LIMESTONE is the one thing most needed to make your land 

FREE BOOKLET ON LIMESTONE IN THE SOIL AND PROPER 
. , ,, ACID TEST 

suction!" wW , treat,se on scientific fertilizing. It is complete and trustworthy and contains 
S es i°" s f w ,ch ,. means more cr °P Profits to the farmer who follows them out. We will also 
f,'', 6 ,; iu " auctions for accurate soil test. Write today— no obligation implied by request 
ior Dookiet and test. 



Columbia Quarry Company 

Producers of 

Ground Limestone for agricultural use. Crushed Limestone for Road 

Building and concrete construction. 

General Offices OtlAHRTF'; 

710 FULLERTON BUILDING IN ILLINOIS 

ST. LOUIS MO. NEAR EAST ST.LOUIS 



riaki 



Columbia 

Limestone 

Booklet 

FREE 



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The Aristo Studio 

614-616 E. Green St. 




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High-class Portraiture 

Courteous Treatment 

and Fair Prices 

are the fundamentals on 

which we have established 

our business. 



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The Aristo Studio 



614-616 E. Green St. 



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EARTH AND STONE HANDLING MACHINERY 

This Company was established in 
1877 and manufactures a very full 
line. Equipment used on all the 
gigantic enterprises on the Ameri- 
can Continent, such as the Welland 
Canal in Ontario, the Selkirk Tun- 
nels in the Rockies, the Lacka- 
wanna Cut-Off in New Jersey, 
Iowa, the Panama Canal, and 
others. 

We invite correspondence with all interested in this class of work. The 
line includes Dump Cars of all sizes. Spreader Cars, Levellers, Graders, 
Conveyors, Wagon Loaders, Scrapers, Plows, Crushers, Dump Wagons, 
Dump Carts. 

Western Wheeled Scraper Company 

AURORA, ILLINOIS. 




Oct. 28 — Jean Ripley's picture appears in the Sunday paper all dolled up in 
the latest Paris creations. The Alpha Chi's are trying to get her back for second 
semester to help Louise Amborn keep up the social rep. 

Oct. 29 — Illini Sporting Editor announces that Casner in his own inimitable, 
ungrammatical style will report the Minnesota game. 

Oct. 30 — Acacia held their house warming at a total cost of $38.19, which 
includes the cost of the electric light globes swiped by the guests. 

President James gave talk on his idea of the Future University of Illinois. 
He was backed on the stage by row upon row of Prominent Illinois men, all 
chosen by special request. 



S E. DILLAVOU 



Farm Machinery 
Gas Engines 
67 N. Walnut St. 



Vehicles 
Farm Scales 
Champaign, 111. 



Phone— Office, A.uto 1446; Bell 1035 
Residence Auto 1029, Bell 1303 

R. W. BRAITHWAITE, V.S. 

Veterinarian for the University of 

Illinois 

Cor. Wash. & Hickory Champaign, III. 



RELIABLE PLUMBING & HEATING CO 

CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 

Our Specialty: Prompt and Efficient Jobbing Service 



BELL 1056 



AUTO 14 7 2 



599 



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GREETINGS 

85% of the Senior Class Photos 
were made at the 

Howard Studio 



For which we thank you and wish you 

every success in life. Quality has 

determined our popularity and 

will continue to do so. 

We hope to see many of you in our 

new location next fall and will 

welcome you at any time. 



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(If you buy it of T. H. Craig you know it is right) 

University of Illinois 

Pins, Emblems, Souvenir Spoons, Wall Shields in bronze, Smokers' 
articles in brass with University Seal, Brass Book Racks with Seal, and 
many useful articles in brass suitable for the desk and den. Write for 
prices and illustrations for anvthing in University of Illinois jewelry. 

'Established 1896 

T. H. Craig, Jeweler 

Champaign, Illinois 



Nov. 3— FRAN KEEN had her third date of the year. She has not decided 
which one of the three to take to the Pi Phi annual, but if either of the boys 
makes the second trip he has got it cinched. 

Nov. 4— COMITATUS goes down to defeat before the unparalleled Repub- 
lican organization as fostered by Les Ayers and Husband. 

Nov. 6. WALLIE FRAZER and Hazel Davidson put on all that fancy 
stuff at the Student Union dance, whereupon the dance went in the hole. 

Nov. 7— Belgian tag day. Great boon to the Kappa freshmen who were able 
to get three new acquaintances and one date out of the scramble. 



Percival & Mooreliead 

Furniture, Rugs, Hardware, Tools 



Only Complete Home Furnishers in Champaign County 



We rent costumes of all types 

for your 

CIRCUS, PLAY or 

MINSTREL 

FRITZ SCHOULTZ 6 CO. 

19 W.Lake St. Chicago, 111. 



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MORE than ever the men of 
Illinois come to me when 
they need things to wear. They 
have learned that the latch-string 
is out for them always. 

EMERSON SPENCE 

At the convenient corner 
Main and Neil Streets 
Champaign 



601 




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MISS LOUISE AMBOHH 

Modlst 

Girls!!! Due to the fact that "Pete" has left school my 
LARGE AND EXTENSIVE WARDROBE OF BEAU- 
TIFUL CLOTHES WILL BE DISPOSED OF AT 

AUCTION. (Nick, does not dance). 



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Electric 

— Traveling Outfits 

— Percolators 
—Samovars 

— Toasters 

— Grills 



Second helpings usually 
signify that the cooking 
is excellent 

The Electric Chafing Dish 

is the best and most popular means of 
preparing those delectable delicacies that 
gladden the guests and play such an 
important part in the hospitality of the 
host or hostess. Many beautiful patterns 
are on display here. 



Electric Lamps of the Newest 
Designs 

Electric Shop offers an admirable 
selection from a wealth of Electric Lamps. 
All are of attractive design — ranging from 
the student lamp to those of striking art. 

Tilings Electrical are appropriate as gifts for any occasion. 
We will gladly send our mail order catalogue on request. 

Electric Shop— Chicago 





Jackson and Michigan Boulevards 



468 



602 



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Where the Cool Breezes Blow 




The Luxury of a Lake Trip 

Where will you spend your summer vacation? Why not enjoy the charms of our Inland Seas? 
Rest after work is necessary to human endurance, and holidays are a wise economy. The only 
enjoyable and economical outing is on the Great Lakes. All the important ports are reached regu- 
ularly by tlie steamers of the Detroit & Cleveland Navigation Company. These boats are unrivaled 
in point of elegance, comfort and quality of service, the perfect freedom afforded by the salon and 
promenade decks, the commodious state rooms, luxurious furnishings and excellence of cuisine 
makes life aboard these floating palaces a solace to the weary mind and body. 



Where You Can Go 



Daily service between Detroit and Buffalo, May 1st to November 1st. From June 10th to 
September 10, Steamer City of Detroit III, 500 feet long, and Steamer City of Cleveland III, 
444 feet long, two of the largest side-wheel passenger steamers in the world, will operate between 
above points. Daily service between Detroit and Cleveland, April 15th to December 1st. During 
July and August daylight trips will be made, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday out 
of Detroit, and Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday out of Cleveland. Two boats out of 
Detroit and Cleveland, every Saturday and Sunday night, during July and August. Four trips 
weekly between Toledo, Detroit and Mackinac Island, the historic summer resort of the North 
Country, and from June 25 to September 10, special steamer from Cleveland to Mackinac Island, 
two trips weekly, stopping only at Detroit each trip. Daily service to Put-in-Bay from June 
10th to Sept. 10th. 



Railroad|Tickets!AvailabIe 



Tickets reading via any rail line, between Detroit and Buffalo, or Detroit and Cleveland, will 
be honored for transportation on D. & C. Line steamers in either direction. 

Send 2-cent stamp for illustrated pamphlet and Great Lakes map. Address L. G. Lewis, 
General Passenger Agent, Detroit, Mich. 

Detroit and Cleveland Navigation Company 

Philip H. McMillan, President A. A. Schantz, Vice-President and General Manager 

General Offices — Detroit, Michigan 
Steamers arrive and depart from foot of Third Street, Detroit 



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Trevett-Mattis Banking Co. 

Champaign, Illinois 
Capital and Surplus - $200,000.00 

General Banking Business Transacted 

Money to Loan on Farms and City Real Estate at 

Lowest Rates of Interest. 

3% Interest Paid on Savings. 

Your Business is desired 



Nearly Sixty Years 

In cActtbe 'Business 

If you want accurate information regarding any branch of the nursery 
business, we are in a position to give it to you. Our knowledge of varie- 
ties, hardy and of merit, in this climate is unlimited. We sell and plant 

Trees, Shrubs, ^Oines, Fruits 
and Perennials 

PETERSON NURSERY 

30 N. La Salle St. CHICAGO, ILL. 
Main 3613 



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Machinery and Supplies 

OF EVERY KIND 

Contractors Mines Railroads 

Water-Power Development 

Machine Shops and Factories 

Described in our General Catalogue. 

H. Channon Company, Chicago 



Nov. 8— P. N. DAVIS'S wife officially installed as the Chi Phi matron. 

Nov. ii— PSI U. kicks in with $150 for the Belgians. Best press agent stuff 
pulled off this year. 

NOV. 12— CASEY AND EDGERTON, the old D. G. speed merchants 
blew into town and condescended to stay at the Delta Gamma house. ZEKE 
CURIER stepped over the first night. 




The Panama Limited to New Orleans 

An all-steel train of the highest grade, leaving Chicago and St. Louis daily. Also the 
New Orleans Special, a daily steel train. 

Cuba, Panama, California 

wT 013 ? 3 S- ,?- s ? r Xi ce IT fr ? m New Orleans: sailings twice a week to Havana, Cuba— on 
Wednesdays ship of the United Fruit Co., on Saturdays ship of the Southern Pacific Steam- 
ship line; sailings of the United Fruit Co's "Great White Fleet." under the American flag 
twice a week to Panama (Wednesdays via Havana, Saturdays direct); also sailings every 
Ihursday to Central American ports. Illinois Central service to New Orleans, including 
through tourist sleeping car to California via the Southern Route— New Orleans and the 
Southern Pacific — leaving Chicago and St. Louis every Monday. 

Seminole Limited to Jacksonville, Florida 

All-steel train of most modern type to Florida daily from Chicago and St. Louis via Birm- 

nd 
ept 



: ,, l "-" imiii u. ii.u=i muuciii lypc to x-ionua aany irom Llncago and St. Louis via Birrr 
ingham making connections at Jacksonville for all Florida points, including Port Tampa an 
Key West, from which cities to Havana, Cuba, steamship service is maintained (daily excel 
Sunday from the latter and tri-weekly from the former). 

To the North and West from Chicago 

Complete and comprehensive train service, including steel trains, is maintained to Minne- 
apolis and St. Paul, Council Bluffs and Omaha, Sioux City and Sioux Falls, and Rockford, 

rreeport, Dubuque, Waterloo and Ft. Dodge, the service from the South being so arranged 
as to make comfortable connections with trains leaving for the north and west. 

For further information, specific train time, descriptive literature, etc., write or call udoii 

H. J. PHELPS G. H. BOWER 

General Passenger Agent S. G. HATCH 

Chicago, Illinois 



General Passenger Agent 
Passenger Traffic Manager Memphis, Tennessee 



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OF 

OUR BEST 

SELLERS 




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Cabinet No. 94 



Steel Operating 
Table No. 2 



HESE four different articles gives one a lim- 
ited idea of the variety of our line. 

Our catalog showing many designs in natural colors will be gladly mailed 
on request. 

EASY PAYMENTS 

The American Cabinet Company 

Dept. F. TWO RIVERS, WIS. 



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Steel Dental Safe, Open 



NEEDED 
IN 

EVERY 
DENTAL 

OFFICE 



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Switchboard 
Mounting No.6 



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FINE INKS and ADHESIVES 
For those who KNOW 

HIGGINS 




Drawing Inks 
Eternal Writing Inks 
Engrossing Ink 
Taurine Mucilage 
Photo Mounter Paste 
Drawing Board Paste 
Liquid Paste 
Office Paste 
Vegetable Glue, etc. 



Are the Finest and Best Inks and 
Adhesives 

Emancipate yourself from the use of corro- 
sive and ill-smelling ink« and adhesives and 
adopt the Higgins' Inks and Adhesives. 
They will be a revelation to you, they are so 
sweet, clean, well put up, and withal so effi- 
cient. 

At Dealers Generally 

CHAS. M. HIGGINS & CO., Mfrs. 

(Branches, Chicago, London) 
271 Ninth Street Brooklyn, N.Y. 



5 



%ILLINOIS 

IMPROVEMENT BONDS 



Issued by substantial communities 

for Sewers, Watermains 

or Street Paving. 

These bonds are payable from 
taxes already levied and confirmed 
by the County Court and are a lien 
prior to a mortgage or any other 
encumbrance upon the property im- 
proved. 

Our clients have found these 
bonds a most satisfactory invest- 
ment and as they have a prepay- 
ment privilege, we make it a point 
to arrange exchanges and reinvest- 
ments without loss of interest. 

We also collect and forward to 
you principal and interest without 
cost. 

Send for detailed descriptions of 
above and other municipal and cor- 
poration bonds. 



Chas.S 



KIDDER 



&Co, 



Investment Bankers. Estab. 1898 
THE TEMPLE CHICAGO, ILL. 




GARLOCK PACKINGS 



stand for 



SAFETY FIRST ALWAYS 



You take no chances when you buy from us. Our packings are the best by test. 
A few of our representative styles: 

No. 200 Ring for High Pressure Steam 

No. 333 Ring for Medium Pressure Steam. 

No. 260 Ring for Inside Packed Plungers of Boiler Feed Pumps. 

No. 1906 Duo for Outside Packed Plungers of Boiler Feed Pumps. 

No. 900 High Pressure Sheet. 

No. 22 Red Sheet for General Service 

No. 950 High Pressure Gaskets for Boiler Manholes and Handholes 

Our Catalog is yours THE GARLOCK PACKING COMPANY, Palmyra, Ne w Yo 

tor the asking Branches throughout the country 



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THE UNIVERSITY DRUG STORE 

GREEN STREET PHARMACY 
B. E. SPALDING, PROP. COR. GREEN & OTH ST. 



Cigarette Smokers Attention 

My simple Method will cure you of the VILE habit. 

The Formula: 

Lips that touch tobacco shall never touch mine. 

Miss 

REFERENCES: Nig Healy, Ed. Morrissey, Ed. Berry, and others. 




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WlLKIE & SeLLERY 

TAILORS 

Steger Building 
Wabash Ave. and Jackson Blvd. 
CHICAGO 

IT is true that today a man can buy 
a hat at $1 .50, a pair of shoes at 
$2.50, a suit at $1 5.00 and to all 
outward appearances be for the mo- 
ment reasonably well dressed. 

But such merchandise soon loses its 
outward gloss, and in a little while the 
wearer presents anything but an 
attractive appearance. 

Add to the exclusiveness of the 
design and fabric the sterling quality 
of the merchandise and workmanship 
that goes into our produd, and you 
have the justification for our charges, 
which, while apparently somewhat 
advanced, are really altogether modesl. 

Suits and Overcoats $40 to $75 

Telephone, Harrison 7 



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Ceramic Grads 

After commencement is over, and you start your long fight to "make 
good", remember that a large portion of that mystic "making good" is 
shown in the proper selection of the equipment you use in your life's work. 

The C. W. Raymond Company have lived in the Clay Working 
Industry long enough to know your needs and you can be certain of the 
best results being obtained through Clay Working Machinery. 

We are also in position to render you assistance at any time on the 
subject of practical information and will gladly do so on your request. 

Our Catalog containing clear illustrations and descriptions of tried and 
true machinery, dryers and kilns, is yours for the asking. 

The C. W. Raymond Company 

DAYTON, OHIO, U.S.A. 



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YORK ICE MAKING AND 
REFRIGERATING MACHINERY 

Compression Machines 

Vertical Single Acting 
Horizontal Double Acting 

Absorption Machines 

Live or Exhaust Steam Type 

m Ammonia Fittings andApparatus 

Write for Catalog 

YORK MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

YORK, PENN'A 

See our 10-ton Refrigerating and Ice-Making PUnt in The University of Illinois. 




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Twin City Creamery Butter 

ITS THE BEST 
Twin City Creamery Co. 

CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 



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ENOS H. RENNER 

URBANA, ILLINOIS 

PRIVATE AMBULANCE Chairs and Tables to Rent 



BOTH PHONES 



Nov. 13 — Interurban cars from Danville running on special schedule in 
order to transport the PHI DELT Home Coming refreshments. 

Nov. 14— ILLINOIS 21— CHICAGO 7. NUF SED. 

Nov. 15 — COP HEALY swears he never will come back to the Phi Psi 
house as long as the house continues to vote the prohibition ticket. 



H. SWANNELL & SON, Reliable Druggists Established 1860 

Older than the University. The reliable store for your Prescriptions, Drugs, and Drug 

Store Goods. The Tj exall Store 

Cut Prices on Toilet Articles No. 1 Main Street, Champaign 



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THEO'BYRNETRANSFER 
AND STORAGE COMPANY 

Branches 

THE CAVE TITE WAD'S 

SPALDING & QUIRK'S 



611 



H. I. Carpenter 

PIANO 
TUNER 




INSTRUCTOR 
IN 

MUSIC 



established in 1883 

Co-Op. Bldg. 
Greknand Wright St. 



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HT^E Princess Theatre is the shrine 
of the movie fan. With an ear ever 
alert to his wishes, the management 
present upon their versatile screen the 
pleasantest of pictures, be they comic, 
tragic or spectacular. 

The Princess Theatre 

The Best in Motion Pictures 
Urbana, Illinois 



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Beauties on Display 

The Original pictures of the ILLIO Beauty Section will be on 
display in The ILLIO Office May 20, from two to four p. m.. 
Come early and avoid the RUSH. 

HOW MUCH ARE WE OFFERED? 



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CHAMPAIGN BOTTLING WORKS 

61 CHESTER STREET 

SODAS 

ALL FLAVORS 

SIPHONS, GINGER ALE, ETC. GAS IN DRUMS 

M. MAHER, Proprietor BELL PHONE 95 



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S. A. Sandweger 

COAL AND COKE 

301 N. West St., Urbana, III. 

Bell 201 Auto 4239 



V^here University men are 

VV HtlC always welcome 
— whether thay come to idle a 
breathing space between classes 
or to select that new hat— where 
they are fitted with the best 
things to wear, honest goods at 
reasonable prices~-where they 
always feel at home - — 

That is Zom's 

Roger Zombro 
Green street 



THE "RACINE'' FANNING MILL 
Combined Grain Grader, Cleaner and Seed Separator 




If there is no dealer in your town handling this mil 
costing you anything. 



Bagging attachment 
holds two sacks and 
saves wasting grain 
and seed and the 
work of two men. 
One man can clean 
more seed grain than 
three men can clean 
with an ordinary mill 
in the same time. No 
farmer can afford to 
plant imperfect grain 
or weed seed. Selling 
the "Racine" means 
this: You make a 
good profit on each 
sale and by saving 
time and money for 
your farmer friends 
and increasing the 
value of their crops, 
you are helping your- 
self toward profits on 
other goods they will 
need. 



write us how you can get one without 



JOHNSON & FIELD MFG. CO., Racine, Wis. 



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SIMPLIFIED 



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Engineers, Contractors, etc., who want 
the latest and most simple fan construction 
and design, should get full data on our 
new Seri-Vane Impulse Fan. 

New principle— more air delivery—and 
guaranteed. Our catalogue is ready. 

THE NEW YORK BLOWER CO. 

General Offices: 
25th Place and Stewart Ave. 
Chicago, 111. 



Works: 
Bucyrus, Ohio 



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Authentic Weight Records A 
Necessity for Scientific 
Farming' 

To get best results from the 
use of up-to-date methods and 
farm machinery you must have 
accurate figures on every phase 
of your work. Correct weights 
are your most important fig- 
ures. Weights 
of raw material, 
feed and grow-' 
ing stock taken 
with 

Fairbanks Scales 

help you as producer, buyer and seller by giving you accurately the only basis for 
determining your profit. Protect yourself — weigh your products "on the scale you can 

rely upon — the scale that creates confidence in every man who deals with you the 

scale that lasts a lifetime. 

Fairbanks, Morse ®, Co. 

Chicago St. Louis 



Dec. i— JACK WATSON elected football captain on a Y. M. C A. platform. 

Dec. 5 — CRANE and his feminine cohorts are still trying to entice regular 
people to go to the Prom. 

Dec. 6— The scandal starts about ANN VOSS and her KAP SIG freshman. 

Dec. 7— Last desperate effort to get "BEE" COPLEY into the beauty 
section fails. 

"' 1 



OWL CEMENT 

GERMAN and AMERICAN 

Expert Knowledge and Methods Combined Explain the SUPERIORITY of 

OWL CEMENT 
GERMAN-AMERICAN PORTLAND CEMENT WORKS 

E. L. Cox, General Sales Agent 

Vt2t Marquette Building, 
Works: La Salle, III. CHICAGO 




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A.STARP BEST ALV1N E BAST1EN CARROLL RIDGWAY 

/XotakrBest 

/ " INCORPORATED 

Madison a Wabash 
Chicago 

Outfitters 
to Young Men 

Clothing, Hats, 
Furnishings, Shoes 

Imporltrs of 

Exclusive Novelties in Neck- 
wear, Leather Goods and all 
A ccessories to Young Men s Dress 



THE 

KALO SHOP 

Designers and Makers of 
Handwrought 

Jewelry and 

Silverware 

Sketches and estimates furnished upon 
request. 

Goods sent on approval. 

32 North Michigan Boulevard 
CHICAGO 

7 1 8 Fifth Avenue, NEW YORK 



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Hotel Cumberland 



NEW YORK 

Broadway and 54th Street 

"Broadway" cars from Grand Central Depot 

7th Avenue cars from Pennsylvania Station 



|Be? Kept by a College Man 

Headquarters for College Men 

Ten minutes walk to Forty Theatres 
Rooms with bath, $2.50 and up. 

Special Rates for College Teams 

New and Fireproof 
Harry P. Stimson, Manager 

Headquarters for Illinois 

The Cumberland does moreCollege business thanany other Hotel inNewYork 




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WATCH OUR DAILY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

"Ike LYRIC 

AIMS TO PLEASE ITS PATRONS WITH 



Perfect Pictures 



PRESENTED IN THE RIGHT WAY 



ALL STAR 
ATTRACTIONS 
EVERY FRIDAY 



QUALITY 

PROGRAM 

EVERY DAY 



STAR FEATURES 

EVERY 

WEDNESDAY 



Matinee Daily 2 P. M 



Evenings 7 P. M. 



THE ILLINOIS STUDENT UNION 

WANTS A PURPOSE 

For years we have tried to discover an excuse for our existence. We can't 
do it. We appeal to The Student Body. Will you help us ? Liberal Reward. 



Howard Nash, President Phones; Bell 292 
B.C. Henness, Sec'y-Treas. Auto 1735 

CHAMPAIGN SEED CO. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Farm and Garden Seed, Feed 
and Poultry Supplies 

CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 



rthur H. Challis, Cornell '11 

Chester 0. Fischer, Illinois '12 

Incorporated 18S1 

Massachusetts Mutual Life 
Insurance Company 

Springfield, Massachusetts 

AGENCY FOR CENTRAI/ILLINOIS 

CHALLISS 6 FISCHER, Managers 

815-16 JFFFERSONiBUILDING 

PEORIA 



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Seventeen years ago the first bag 
of CHICAGO- A A Portland Cement was 
placed on the market, and since that 
time the reputation of CHICAGO-AA 
has grown rapidly. 

Seventeen years of day and night 
watching by a corps of competent 
chemists, has prevented any varia- 
tion in the quality of CHICAGO-AA. 

In all the years that CHICAGO-AA 
has been on the market, there has 
never been a justifiable complaint. 
High quality and attractive and uni- 
form color have created a large and 
constantly growing demand 
for the brand that has made 
good in service,CHICAGO-A A. 

Made in one mill and from one quarry only, iy 

Chicago Portland Cement Co. 

Main Office: 30 No. La Salle St., Chicago 

Mill and Quarry, Oglesby, III. 




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ALEXANDER LUMBER CO. 

Mannfactures of Silos, and Wood Tanks 
and Everything' for the fa,rm 




We Make the 

CRANE 

PATENT 

TRIPLE 

WALL 

SILO 



Permanent 
Wood 

Construction 
No Iron Hoops 



R.S.Bassett 

Local and 
Dist. Manager 

Champaign,!!!. 



TheArcade 

Barber 

Shop 

Excels all others in 

Barber Work 

Complete line of Razors, Strops, and 
Barber Supplies. 

GEO. G. BROWN 

Bradley Arcade 



Dec. 9— THE COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION tramps on the peti- 
tion to extend the Xmas vacation. 



Dec. 10— While COL. MAC CHESNEY lectures to the Laws on "How to 
be honest tho a lawyer, some Ag steps over and swipes three overcoats from the 
coat rack. 



Dec. n— The JUNIOR PROM dates spring several surprises. At that it 
was even money that Whitey wouldn't take ALICE CHESLEY. 



Havoline Oil 

"It makes a difference" 

SOLD EVERYWHERE 

If your local dealer or garage can't supply you, order from our nearest dis- 
tributing station or direct from 

INDIAN REFINING COMPANY, 17 Battery Place, New York 



619 




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The Original and Only 



Sykes 



Making pictures in 

Chicago Chicago 



Melvm H. Sykes 

Official Chicago Photographer 
for the ILLIO 



Stevens B'ld'g, 16 N. Wabash 

Telephone, Central 342 



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Dec. 1 2. Slooey makes All- Amer- 
ican and accepts with pleasure. 

"RUBE" gives "BEE" up as lost for- 
ever. 




Brothers: 

CLOTHIERS 

23 Main St. Champaign 

Home of Hart Schaifnerfc Marx 
Clothes 



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For Fra ternity 
Jewelry, Pins, 
Rings. Buttons 
Charms, Med- 
als, Diamonds 
Society 
Emblems 




Chas. A. Winship & Co. 

705 Masonic Temple 
CHICAGO 



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JOSEPH MOHR, Pres. EDWARD MOHR, Ass't Sec'y 

ALBERT MOHR, Vice Pres. WILLIAM T. MOHR, Treas. 

LOUIS MOHR, Secretary and Consulting Engineer 



John Mohr & Sons 



SOUTH WORKS : 96th Street and Calumet Avenue 
Telephone South Chicago 654 

Largest and Best Equipped 



BOILER SHOP 



In the World 
Engineers, Designers, Machinists 

STEEL PLATE AND STRUCTURAL WORK OF 
EVERY DESCRIPTION. BOILERS OF ALL KINDS 
AND OF HIGHEST GRADE AND EFFICIENCY. 

BLAST FURNACES, HOT STOVES, CUPALOS, MIXERS, CONVERTERS, 
STERILIZERS, STEEL LADLES, FURNACES, ETC , ETC. 

IN FACT EVERYTHING AND ANYTHING MADE OF LIGHT OR HEAVY 
STEEL PLATE OR STRUCTURAL MATERIAL 



NORTH WORKS 

349 to 359 West Illinois Street 

TELEPHONE MAIN 1584 

CHICAGO 



621 



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Central 




Union 



Young Men and Women at College 
Fathers and Mothers at Home 

find 

Central Union Toll Service 

the ideal medium 

for keeping in close touch with one another during the school year. 
In emergencies — day or night — when quick communication is 
necessary, you can always depend upon 

The Telephone Way 

Receivers, Central Union Telephone Company 



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THE Confectionery 

of 

Harris and Mead 

608 East Green Street 

CHAMPAIGN 

Is the Home of All Good Things 

To Eat 

ESPECIALLY 

''LeFUogue Chocolates, 60c the pound 



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Press THIS Into 
Service 

PRESSING as a fine art, 
contrary to popular belief, 
is not exclusively confined 
to the Ancient Order of Fus- 
sers. No, fool's mice, you're 
wrong again. Pressing duds 
that takes you out of the four 
million class is the particular 
function of " Woodie's Place " ; 
not forgetting a shoe shining 
service that's wool-worth the 
money. (Orpheum stuff!) 

Woodie's Place 

Over on Green Street 



Renting of Caps and Gowns to 
Graduating Classes a Specialty 

E. R. MOORE 
Company 

Makers of 

Collegiate Caps, Gowns 
and Hoods 

Originators of 

Moore's Official High School 
Cap and Gown 



932-938 Dakin Street 
CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



Dec. 15— It looks like MID FORKEY'S heavy lover is slipping away away 
away to the Delta Gamma house. 

Dec. 16— The ILLINI runs out of pep and trys to start a dancing agitation 
in order to decrease the necessity for news. 

Dec. 18— THE PHI GAMS lifted the house rules and gave a party to the 
blee and Mandolin Clubs. Smoking was permitted. 

Dec. 20— GRACE FLOOD promises BALDY not to give anybody any more 
dates at all whatsoever except dear OLD BALDY. 



Emblems in Gold and Silver 

The better kind -the dependable sort of things to take into life— that's 
one of our Specialties— sterling spoon with Seal of University and other pieces 
of flat ware- pins from 50c up to $8.00— Fobs and Fraternity and Sorority 
pins. Special designs on application. 



Hallmark 
Store 



WUESTEMAN 

Jeweler and Silversmith 



Hallmark 
Store 



623 



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Catering to those 
who appreciate 
the best in 
photogra phy 



BOTH PHONES 
208 N. NEIL STREET, CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 



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R. D. Burnham 



N. M. Harris 



Burnham and Harris 

200 First National Bank Building 
Champaign, Illinois 



Farm and City Loans 



Investments 



« 



99 



She Had No Mother to Guide Her 

Sung with great feeling by 

THE ILLINOIS MAOAZINE 



We are not as helpless as The Illini may lead you to believe. We love our 
Editor. All we ask is to be let alone. It ain't like the good old days when Mark 
and Doc. were around. 



Buildings Erected for University of Illinois 



Auditorium 
Lincoln Hall 
Woman's Building 
Agronomy Building 
Beef Cattle Building 
Ceramics Building 
Entomology Building 
Heating Plant 
Horticultural Building 
StocK Judging Pavilion 
Administration Building 



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English Brothers 

CONTRACTORS 

CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 



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PRINTING BY ELECTRIC LIGHT 

Crofoot, Nielsen & Co. 

BLUE PRINTERS 

BLUE PRINTING, BLACK PRINTING, BLUE LINE AND 

COLOR PRINTING 

Special Service Always — Speed and RESULTS. Big Floor Space and 
Equipment for Rush Orders 



1 80 W. Washington Street 



CHICAGO 



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Thos. 

Franks & Son 

CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 



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Are the Florists 
of the City 



Are You Satisfied ? 

DRINK 

M 




IT SATISFIES! 

The Greatest of Refreshing Drinks 



at 
All Founts 



5c 



or 
Bottled 



Drink it — It will give you new 
energy. 

ILLINOIS PARFAY CO. 

CHAMPAIGN 
Phone Bell 439 



626 



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THE GRADUATE'S BESTOWAL 

A gentle admonition to 

Sweetheart, Younger Brother or Sister 

"To never go elsewhere" but the 

Arcade /v^^c^€^ Downtown 

For "Chocolate a la Boston". The Premier of Fountain Drinks. 



Jan. 4— BLONDY NORENBURG starts kidding one of the Kappa fresh- 
men along. Even money that she will fall for his sob stuff and ask him to the 
KAPPA formal. 

Jan. 9 — WILLIFORD starts making his fussing headquarters at the Hos- 
pital Cottage. He says that his Hospital stand-in has his THETA stand-in 
beaten a city block. 

Jan. ii — Keller is on the bill at the Orpheum this week, which is adding 
insult to injury. 

Jan. 15 — The PI PHIS win out in the Sorority Roast contest, having doped 
out more scandal than all the other eight put together. 



THE THIRD STREET BAKERY AND DELICATESFN 

604 South Third Street, Just off Green 

CAFFETERIA IN CONNECTION 

THE LITTLE SHOP WITH THE BIG EATS 

G. A. OSTRAND, Proprietor 



The Home Telephone Co. 

OF CHAMPAIGN COUNTY 

Telphone Building. Neil and Clark Streets 

CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 



Manford Savage, psesideui 
Herman Kiper, treasurer 



Sanford F. Harris, secrktart 
H. T. Williamson, gen. mgr 



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ESTABLISHED 27 YEARS 



LARGEST EXCLUSIVE MERCHANT 
TAILOR IN CHICAGO 



Harry G. Smucker 



40 Mentor Building 
State and Monroe Streets 



CHICAGO 

TELEPHONE CENTRAL 706 

Moderate Best 

Prices Values 



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WESTERN 
MEDIUM PRICED 

Vitrified and Impervious 

FACING BRICK 

Sold at prices midway between common backing and mechanically 
perfect pressed Brick. Capacity 95,000,000 yearly. 

Western Brick Co. 

DANVILLE, ILL. 

Write for Catalog. 




CHESLEY & CO. 

The Best Place to 

EAT 

for the money 

GROCERIES 

High Grade Candies Fruits 

70k S, Goodwin Ave. 



ff DlA^lIn ,, BRAND 

Dig UUn DRESS SUITS 

Call and see me when you need a 
dress suit. I have all sizes. 

Phone Central 4875 

T. C. SCHAFFNER 

130 North State Street, CHICAGO 



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Charlottesville 
\ Woolen Mills 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



High Grade Uniform Cloths 



FOR 



Army, Navy, Police and 
Railway Purposes 

And the largest assortment and best quality of 

Cadet Grays 

Including those used at the United States Military 
Academy at West Point, and other leading 
military schools of the Country. Prescrib- 
ed and used by the cadets of the 
University of Illinois 



630 



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HEUSER-BUSGH's 



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^HEUSER-BUSc W . s 

^W TRADE MARK- 

A Liquid Food 1 onic 

For Young and Old 

Sold by 

DRUGGISTS and GROCERS 






Dealer in Fraternity Averages 

Arthur Ray Warnock 6r Co. 

Office of the Dean 

We guarantee to put you at the top of the list. Look what we did for the 
Betas. Prices Reasonable. 



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A FRAGRANT MEMORY 

Wrapped and wreathed into the doings of undergraduate days, mingled 
with the joys of victories on held and diamond, and court and track, there's 
the memory of L:seure Bros, li'l ol* Smoke Haven on Green street. 

Here was the gathering place of the clans, here the dopiest dope on pick- 
ing the winner was ever fresh, here at hand was much good tobacco, always 
kept good and to be had for the mere bartering of a measly dime or quarter, 
here met the billiard shark, the politician, the "I" men all the old guard 
whose memories hang on the walls of our intimate remembrances. 

LESEURE BROS. 

Right on Green Street. 



631 



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HOTEL BISMARCK 

MODERN ROOMS WITH BATH OR SHOWER 

RATES 

Room with free use of Shower Bath 

$1.00 and up. 

Room with Private Bath, $1.50 

and up. 

Famous for its cookery, rivalling the cel- 
ebrated restaurants of the world, is the 
BISMARCK BERLIN ROOM 

Society Dancing and Musical Entertainment 

4 to 6 P. M. and 8:30 P.M. to 1 A.M. 

Daily. 



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173-181 West Randolph Street Chicago 

One half Block West of City Hall and Court House 





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New-York Life Insurance Co. 

The Greatest Financial and Economic Institution in the World 

It is purely mutual Let us show you 

THE NEW 1915 

SELF-SUSTAINING POLICY 



also 



the 



ROTARY PREMIUM METHOD 

It is unique in that it accommodates itself automatically 
to one's varying financial conditions. 

A. J. Woolman 202 Co-Op 



Nov. 17-SHIFTY SEAMANS has a PI PHI date and keeps the girl out 
until 11 :3c throwing her to a supper at the Chop Suey joint. 

Nov. 18— Ten freshmen stand in line all night for Prom Tickets Total 
sale of first day, fifteen tickets. 

r , N °, V ," 1,9— Band Concert makes $6.55 toward sending the band to Wisconsin 
Uood old Illinois spirit. 

Nov. 20— The big THETA fire. Many intimate garments of the sisters are 
taken for souvenirs. 



arwick 
otel 

:■-: :l|StLouis 



I;;!:;;! New! Fireproof! 

""j;i Circulating ice 

. water, telephone 

- and electric fan 

FIFTEENTH AND LOCUST STS. * n evel T room - 

200 Rooms— 200 Baths. Rates $1.50, $2.00, $2.50 

Send for folder. James E. Buchanan, Manager 



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AMERICAN FOUNTAIN PEN CO. 

Manufacturers 

ADAMS, CUSHING & FOSTER 

Selling Agents 
000 Devonshire St. Eoston. Mass. 



Don't shake 
Moore to start it 
— just touch it to the 
paper. For when a Moore is 
closed, you know, the pen is 
down IN the ink — kept moist and 
free from drying. And it comes up 
ready to write at a touch — and keep 
on writing smoothly. Can" 7 leak 
because it shuts up bottle-tight. 
127 styles from $2.50 up. 

For sale at college 

bookstores and all 

dealers 



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Burned Out, But Still Smiling 



Miss Ray L. Bowman 

JEWELRY 

has established Temporary Quarters with 

The Reliable Plumbing and Heating Co. 

Opposite The Inman 

Expert Watchmaker 



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KAISER INN 
CANNED GOODS 

The James McCoy Company 

PEORIA, ILL. 



Nov. 21— T. N. E. comes out of its hole and kicks in on the hand sub- 
scription. 

Nov. 22-PENDARVIS trys to date up his old high school teacher for a 
hop and gets stung. 

PATlT7MF R AnA M d COMBER , makes the THETA formal with sister ALTA. 
PAULINE ADAMS imports MARCY COYLE'S automobile. 

FTMMp'r a 3 ^T, N( T Saturday ni g ht da "ce opens up in the K. P. hall. TOM 
MNNEGAN leads the grand march ably, assisted by PICK DODDS. 




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The Live Wire Store 



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holds a prominent place in the hearts of all Illinois men. 

Gulick tailored clothes are famous not only for real "style snap" 
but for reasonable price as well. 



Gulick haberdashery is the joy of the well dressed 



man. 



GulicRTailoring' Co. 

CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 



635 

SB 



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Jacob Reed's Sons 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Gold Medal Uniforms 



FOR OFFICERS OF THE 
United States Army Navy and 



Marine Corps 
AND STUDENTS OF PRINCIPAL 

Military Schools ana Colleges 



We are splendidly equipped to supply Custom Tailored and 
Ready to Wear Clothing of exceptional quality and making. 
Haberdashery, Headwear and liveries of every description. 
Presentation Swords, Swagger Sticks, Scarf Pins, Presentation 
Belt Plates, etc., etc. 

Exclusive and only authorized distributors of Greek Letter 
Fraternity Hat Bands and Neckwear. 



Jacob) Reed s Sons 

1424-1426 Chestnut Street 

PHILADELPHIA 



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OrpheuM 

THEATRE 

The Parlor Home of Vaudeville 
PLAYING 

5 Standard Orpheum Acts 5 

New Show Mondays and Thursdays 

Starting at 3:00, 7:30 and 9:00 P. M. 

Mezzanine Loges for Theatre Parties 



Gamma Phi Beta 

(Sorority) 

Wishes to announce that they have decided to move Champaign. We hate to 
desert Urbana, but when trying to be "Greeks do as the Romans do". 






J. M. Kaufman & Co. 

The Store of Distinctive Dress 

Champaign's Largest Store 
Since 1 879 



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HART PORTABLE GRAIN ELEVATOR 

(Cut at right) 

Handles all kinds of grain. If interested 
in elevators, catalogs, building plans, etc. 
will be gladly furnished. 

HART GRAIN WEIGHER CO. 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



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A real elevating plant. 

HART BUCKET 
ELEVATOR 

For installation in 

cribs and warehouses. 

Handles grain, coal 

and many other 

materials. 




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JOS. C. BOWMAN 

Jeweler, Watchmaker 
Silversmith 



We wish to announce to our 
many patrons that since 

THE FIRE 

we have taken temporary quar- 
ters at 

324 N. Neil Street 

Opposite Beardsley Hotel 

August 1 will find us one door 
north of the old stand. 



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BACON BROTHERS' 
Decorating Service 
combines the color 
sense and grace of the artist 
with a workmanlike finish 
that is the most effective 

Bacon Brothers 

Decorators DeLuxe 

On Walnut Street 
in Champaign 



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OLDHAM 
BROTHERS 

Druggists 



Exclusive Agents in Urbana for 

all CHICAGO PAPERS and 

MAGAZINES 

The Rexall Store 



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newest designs ir 



Dance Programs 

at the 

Lowest Prices 

Cije College g>J)op 

900 Marshall Field Annex 
CHICAGO 



Feb. 10 — Mildred Hilsabeck, a new Alpha Delta Pi transfer, raises the A. D. 
P. beauty average about fifty per cent. 

Feb. 12— Pauline Marbold gives John street a treat with a new spring hat. 

Feb. 19— Col. J. N. Greene kicks off at the Military Ball before the admiring 
gaze of Mamma and Papa and with the Belle of Virginia on his arm. 



WITH 

Kaiser Inn and Rite way Brands 

of canned goods 

Palmer Brothers in Urbana 

are catering to student and faculty trade. 



*■* 



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C. N. CLARK & COMPANY 

MAUSOLEUM AND MONUMENT BUILDERS 
URBAN A, ILLINOJJJI. 



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Care/ of Thanks 



We wish to thank the following for their abundant contributions to The 
Roast Section: Deans Clark and Kyle, Skin Barlow, Dr. Cole, The First Meth- 
odist Church, N. C. Seidenberg, Professor Nathan Weston, Doctor Simon Kit- 
man, J. C. Hostetler, and Tommy Thomson. Wreak your vengeance on them. 



L 



EISNER GROCERY COMPANY 

DISTRIBUTORS OF 
LIBRARY AND UNIVERSITY CANNED GOODS 



JOHN H. DOYLE 

(Sin fessor to T. H. Trevett) 

STOVES, HARDWARE and TINWARE. Malleable Ranges, Radiant Home Furnaces 

BOTH PHONES CH A MP AIGN. ILLINOIS 



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OH 

OH PRODUCTIONS 



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ARE THE CHOICEST OF COR- 
RECT DRESS REQUISITES FOR 
YOUNG MEN. 

CLOTHING, HATS AND 
FURNISHINGS FOR ALL 
OCCASIONS. 

NOVELTIES IN OUTING AND 
SPORTING WEAR 

SUITS AND OVERCOATS 
AS LOW AS $25.00 



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Men's TH Store 



O gilvie &Henea£ e 

18- 20 East Jackson Boulevard 

CHICAGO 



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HOF-BRAU 

16-18 West Main St. 

DANVILLE, ILLINOIS 



The finest Cafe in Illinois 
Most exquisite 
Best equipped 






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Cuisine of the highest order 

Sunday Table D'Hote is unsurpassed 

Prices moderate Service Best 

HOF-BRAU 

Catering Company 

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BELL TELEPHONE 1967 

Pitsenbarger 6 Flynn 

Cleaning, Pressing and 
Repairing 

WORK CALLED FOR AND DELIVERED 
Quality Work Personal Attention 

First door east of Harris & Meade on 

Green Street 

Champaign.il linois 



F. G CAMPBELL & SONS 

Real Estate, Loans Insurance 

am Rental Agents 

.112 E. University Ave. 

Auto Plrone 2228 Champaign, 111. 



Whose Moneys 

If you are handling your own 
funds you will naturally select 
your investments with care. 

But — if you are entrusted with funds 
of others for investment you 
must be ultra-conservative and 
eliminate every element of spec- 
ulation. 

I specialize in securities suited for the 
investment of trust funds, those 
in which safety is considered 
above all else. 

Why take chances? Write me to- 
day for a detailed list of offer- 
ings. 

G. F. Carson 

209 S. Jefferson Ave. Peoria, 111. 



Feb. 20— First track try-out of the year. RAPPING and TAPP fail to mix 
up as TAPP has a blister on his foot. 

Feb. 25 — PO FIELD is still hanging around. He likes his "home" but the 
PI PHIS are thinking about charging him rent. 

March i-MAYME KEGLEY is back in town. The Chi O's have had 
some darn good looking girls. 



The Seniors at the University of Illinois 

ALWAYS GET THEIR CAPS AND GOWNS FROM THE 

E. R. MOORE COMPANY 

932-38 Dakin Street Chicago, Illinois 

"ZOM" ATTENDS TO THE DISTRIBUTION 



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Stipes Coal 

— as well as service is of the highest quality. 

— Our Lump Coal is is forked at cars, removing all slack, giving our custom- 

ers nothing but clean coal. 

— Our Pochanontas Smokeless comes from the very best mines, screened 

over a 5 inch screen. 

— Our Hard Coal is good clean coal, practically free from slate. 
— We pride ourselves on our service, after putting in your c 



so that you cannot tell there has been a coal man aro 

**We especially solicit the business of the Professors, also 
rity, and Rooming houses. 

**Give us a trial that we may prove the above, call us ur 
and we will be pleased to send a solicitor to you wh 
merits of our coal. 

ROYAL A. STIPES 

SAND, GRAVEL AND COAL 



can up 




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World's Best Photo Plays Home of the Pipe Organ 

&/>e PARK 

CHAMPAIGNS FIRST THEjAe 



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P. D. FOSTER 

PLANING MILL 

CABINET, OFFICE AND 
FURNITURE WORK 

South Chestnut St. CHAMPAIGN, ILL. 



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Were /s ffte P/an of f/ie Mercantile Trust Company First Mortgage 
$500 Real Estate Serial Notes 

Ioan 1 'of h $50 000 r or teJ^Zt.Tltr^ pT0 ^ rt f- . whicl ? !s . valiK.l at say $100,000. applies for a 
oau ot J.5U.UU0 or ess. Aftei careful personal investigation and appraisement of the nronertv 

tomake^hfloan " any Md considera, ' » ^ *PP™aI of our Board of Directors? wc ■agree 

• This loan is to be paid serially— that is, an agreed amount payable each year for four years 
«nn bal f nce „ at the e "< of the fifth year. This loan of $50.000'is made up of 100 serial notes 
of fhe ent a i C re'loan SeCUred ^ * "^ MOR ' J(;A<;K °" this property of at feast ^eTe' va°lue 
i^nn' E \ e '' y six t m ° nths the interest is payable. At the end of each year a certain number of the 
$.100 notes must he paid in full. The full security of $100,000 value remains in fo ice ado 
part of the mortgage can be released until the last $500 note is paid 

outrilht a bv uf,, 1 Ten - K ° te t S ° 1 ' 1 ' ,y •V 1 V MercantiI = Trust Company has first been bought 

loan ( ur fro fit i i , P^stment until disposed of. The proceeds enable us to make other 

loans, our pront is the commission charged the borrower. 

real estate'Toan* S - Pla "' "" invest0r of limitc ' 1 means ™" "»' s Participate in the highest class of 

II If yow.conU-mplatc making an investment, send for our detailed circulars. 

REAL ESTATE LOAN DEPARTMENT 
Mercantile Trust Company, Saint Louis 

Capital and Surplus $9,500,000 



Illio Financial Statement 

RECEIPTS 

R v ftising... $ 6 

ir-reg^r Advertising 28067 

Advertising given DAILY ILLINI ZZ 0000 

Hush Money (Complete List of File) 723000 

Editor and Business Manager for privilege of flunking all of' their 'work 1 000 02 
Organizations (Eugenics Society, etc.) ' , n ,(- 

Sale of Books (G. Davis, etc.).: "Z412.789.23 



Total 



$14,869.90 

EXPENDITURES 

Printing, Binding and Engraving 5 I2D g 

I iw suits caused by Roast Section . ... r g 587 21 

University Regiment as Body Guard for Roast Editor 7361 

To Beauties for use of pictures 



Total 

Deficit made up by GOOD WILL 



7,52942 

.$26,192.80 
..$11,322.90 



Get Your Laundry Done Right 

HOUSE MANAGERS! 



write 



We have a proposition for you. All work guaranteed. For particul 



ars 



J W. SMALLEY 

Model Laundry, 137-139 N. Walnut Street, Danville, Illinois 



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Unmatched in 118\ miles radius 
for men's andyoung men's clothes 

Jos. Kuhn 6 co. 

22.35-37 Main St. CHAMPAIGN 

Here you find an exhibition 
on many of the best makers 
in America and not the usual 
small variety. This holds 
true in 

Clothes, Shoes 
Hats andFurnisi ings 



SOME OF 

OUR 

PATRONS 



The Agriculturist 

Illinois Magazine 

Siren 

Alumni Quarterly 

Daily Ulini 

Students' Directory 

Technograph 

Illio 



ALMOST every illustration 

on the campus 

is made by 



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CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 
BELL 411 AUTO 2162 



E. S. DODSON 

Urbana's Leading Florist 

Caters to University trade 

404 E. Main URBANA 



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The 

Apperson-Reimer Plumbing and Heating Co. 

Practical Plumber and Fitter 

Repair Work Best Attention 

Phones, Auto M52; Bell 832 
109 West Elm Street Urbana, Illinois 



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The Inman 

Cafe 

The Inman Cafe and 
Dining Room combine 
the satisfaction of ap- 
petizing food well served 
with tlie refinement of 
beautiful surroundings. 

A place patronized <»d 

appreciated by V>i r 

sity men, wotiien, 

townspeople, and 

travelers alike. 



WILLIAM 

WALLACE 

PAUL 

FASHIONABLE 
FOOTWEAR 

Cor. Main and Walnut Sts. 
CHAMPAIGN 

At Your Service 



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March 4 — George Richmond made his one bone head play today when he 
asked the teacher to please assign a lesson. 

March 5 — By strong arm press agent work, SEIDENBERG fails to get 
his "I"S for the tennis-playing brothers. 

I'ostel denies he ever gave a dinner to anybody. 

March 6— WEN McCRACKEN drags LOUIS MANN'S leading lady to a 
HELMET dance. 



FRANCES J. KILKENNY 

WOMAN'S TEMPLE 
CHICAGO 

SAFE INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

For years confidential Secretary to the U.S. Secretary of Treasurer 



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Footwear 
you'll like 






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50 and $4 
Exclusively 



Mc WILLIAMS & GLEIM, Milliners 

71 N. Neil Street. CHAMPAIGN 

We bend every effort to follow the Modes and Styles demanded by the University girls 



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A FEW PARING SHOTS 

Do you know Pethybndge's love? ^ r ou see her with everybody else. 
Stranger in Town — "Say, pal, can you tell me where I can get booze ?"' 
Student — You can't do it, Tommy Arkle couldn't even get him. 
Feminist movement — Sigma Nu imports depart carrying their own suitcases. 

If love were really blind I believe I would have half a chance. — Robinson 
Phi Gam. 

Why should I keep from smiling? 1 can't help knowing I'm good. — Bart. 



L 



To those contemplating the Purchase of Good Photographs 
We Tender Our Services 



The Photo Art Shop 

Co-Op. Building, Second Floor 



Come in and see our fine facilities for doing the best work, and look 
at what we've done for others. We'll convince you of our ability to give 
YOU satisfaction, 



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Robert 0. Law Company 

Book Binders 

633-641 PLYMOUTH COURT 

CHICAGO 

WE BOUND THE ILLIO 

We Specialize on College Annuals 

Dummies and Prices Furnished on Application 



The David J. Molloy 

f nmnanv 633 Plymouth Court 

company. Chicago, Illinois 

Mechanical Decorators 

ON 

LEATHERS CLOTHS PAPERS 

We Specialize on Leathers for Binding 
College Annuals 

The LEATHER for the binding of the ILLIO was made under this 
process. 



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THOROUGHLY SATISFACTORY SERVICE 
SUPERB QUALITY — ORIGINAL IDEAS 

Write for our Big 1916 Plan. - - Get your name on our Mailing List. 
BUREAU OF ENGRAVING, Incorporated. - - MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA. 



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xA# Flanigan-Pearson 
Company 

CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS 

PRINTERS OF THE 1916 ILLIO 



FEEL justly proud of The 
1916 Illio. They are to 
a large extent responsible for the 
fact that it is out on time. They 
have printed it on paper that 
many companies said was not 
practicable for a college annual. 
They have done it well. They 
have handled the difficult three- 
color plates in an excellent 
manner. 



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General Index 



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Acacia 346-347 

Acanthus 382-383 

Achoth 420-421 

Adelphic Literary Society 480-481 

Ag Dance Committee 224 

Agricultural Club 488-489 

Agriculturist, The 168-169 

Alethenai Literary Society 474-475 

Alpha Chi Omega 404-405 

Alpha Chi Sigma 438-439 

Alpha Delta Phi 36-361 

Alpha Delta Pi 416-417 

Alpha Gamma Rho 436-437 

Alpha Rho Chi 446-447 

Alpha Sigma Phi 352-353 

Alpha Tau Omega 330-331 

Alpha Xi Delta 408-409 

Alpha Kappa Psi 450 

Alpha Zeta 430-431 

A. S. M. E 498-499 

Architectural Club 500 

Aquatics 279-282 

Athenian Literary Society 476-477 

Athletic Association 228-229 

Athletic Association, Women's 3*1 

Athletic Board of Control 228 

Athletics - 225-316 

Athletics, Class 295-308 

Band, Military 200-201 

Band, Second 202-203 

Band, Reserve 202 

Baseball 243-250 

Baseball Review 246-247 

Basketball 273-278 

Basketball, Review 275 

Ben Franklin 5io 

Beta Gamma Sigma 451 

Beta Theta Pi 336-337 

Bethany Circle 5*4 

Board of Class Managers 296 

Board of Control, Athletic 228 

Board of Trustees 36-37 

Bowling 307 

Centro Literario Espanol 486 

Ceramic Society 5°2 

Chemical Club 490-491 

Chi Beta 372-373 

Chi Delta 386-387 

Chinese Club 390-391 

Chi Omega 406-407 

Chi Phi 366-367 

Chi Psi 368-369 

Tnterscholastic Circus i5i-'52 

Civil Engineering Societv 494-495 

Class Athletics .- 295-308 

Class Athletic Managers 296 

Class Baseball 3<>5 

Class Basketball 300-301 

Classes 41-132 

Class Football • 206-297 



Class Scrap 138-139 

Class Swimming 302-303 

Clubs and Societies 467-524 

College Dancing Club 520 

Colonel, Student Regiment 209 

Comitatus 456 

Commencement 42-43 

Commercial Club 492 

Council of Administration 38-39 

Cosmopolitan Club 388-389 

Cross Country 267 

Crystal Dancing Club 522 

Daily Illini 154-156 

Dances, University 217-224 

Debate and Oratory 191-198 

Dedications jfr. 6-7 

Delta Gamma Mf**. 4 I2 -4i3 

Delta Kappa Epsilon....^P. 342-343 

Delta Omega 380-381 

Delta Sigma Rho 440 

Delta Tau Delta 320-321 

Delta Upsilon 344-345 

Deutsche Verein 5°9 

Dixie Club 524 

Dramatic clubs 176-179 

Dramatics I73-J90 

Egyptian Club 504 

Electrical Engineering Society 496-497 

Eta Kappa Nu 4 2 7 

Fencing 285 

First Sergeants 211 

Football 231-242 

Football, Freshman Varsity 290 

Fraternities, Social 3 l 7~392 

Fraternities, Honorary 423-464 

299 
301 
303 
132 
216 
291 
290 
292 
293 
294 



Freshman Class Football 

Freshman Class Basketball 

Freshman Class Swimming 

Freshman Class Officers 

Freshman Company, Winning- 
Freshman Varsity Baseball 

Freshman Varsity Football 

Freshman Varsity Track 

Freshman Varsity Basketball. 
Freshman Varsity Swimming.. 



Gamma Alpha 444 

Gamma Phi Beta 418-419 

Girls Basketball Teams 312-313 

Girls Pan-Hellenic Association 397 

Girls Stunt Show 145 

Glee and Mandolin Clubs 204-205 

Graphomen 523 

Gregorian Literary Society 4 8 3 

Guild, Thacher Howland 9 

Gymnastics 2 °3 

Helmet Club 454-455 

Home Coming 133-HO 



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Honorary and Professional Frater- 
nities 423-464 

Household Science Club 487 

Illini, The Daily 154-156 

Illini Publishing Company 157 

Illini, The Summer 172 

Illini, Tribe of The 230 

Illinois Agriculturist 168-169 

Illinois Magazine 166-167 

Illinois Students Union 470-471 

Illinois Union Dramatic Club 176-177 

Illio 158-163 

Illiola Literary Society 478 

Ilus Club 374-375 

In Memoriam 8 

In the Limelight, 191 5 46-48 

Innes of Court 460 

Interfraternity Athletics 307 

Interscholastic 141-152 

Interscholastic Circus 151-152 

Interscholastic Records 149-150 

Interscholastic MAet 146-148 

Intercollegiate Peace Contest 198 

Ionian Literary, Society 479 

Iris 376-377 

Iowa Debate 195 

James, President 35-40 

James, Mrs. Edmund 10 

Jamesonian Literary Society 482 

Junior Class Baseball 305 

Junior Class Football 298 

Junior Class Basketball 300 

Junior Class Swimming 302 

Junior Class Officers 126 

Junior Girls Basketball 313 

Junior Girls Hockey 315 

Junior Officers 210 

Junior Prom 218-219 

Kappa Alpha Theta 398-399 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 402-403 

Kappa Sigma 324-325 

Kappa Alpha Nu 392 

Keramos 503 

Ku Klux Klan 453 

Lambda Epsilon Phi 457 

Lambda Tau Rho 464 

Lambkins Club 178-179 

Latino Americano Club 508 

Le Cercle Francais 515 

Literary Societies 472-483 

Loyante 519 

Mask and Bauble Dramatic Club.... 174-175 

Manager of Class Athletics 296 

Mandolin and Glee Clubs 204-205 

Mawanda 448 

May Pole Dance 143-144 

Mechanical Engineering Society 498-499 

Memoriam, In 8 

Menorah 505 

Michigan Debate 19- 

Military 207-216 

Military Ball 222-223 

Military Band 200-201 

Minnesota Debate 194 



Mining Society 501 

Motorcycle Club 484 

Music 199-206 

Mu Kappa Alpha 459 



North Atlantic Club 

Northern Oratorical League- 



Officers University Brigade 

Omicron Nu 

Oratorical League, Northern... 

Oratory and Debate 

Oratory and Debate, Board of.. 
Ourdoor Basketball 



Pan-Hellenic Association (Men's).. 
Pan-Hellenic Association (Wom- 
en's) 

Peace Contest 

Phi Alpha Delta 

Phi Alpha Phi 

Phi Delta Theta 

Phi Gamma Delta 

Phi Kappa 

Phi Kappa Psi 

Phi Kappa Sigma 

Phi Lambda Upsilon 

Philomathean Literary Society 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Phi Delta Psi 

Pi Beta Phi 

Pi Omicron 

Players' Club 

Post Exam Jubilee 

President James 

Psi Delta 

Psi Mu 

Psi Upsilon 

Publications 



507 
198 

209-213 
461 
198 

191-198 
193 
304 

319 

397 
198 

432-433 
428-429 
328-325 
332-333 
364-365 
340-341 
326-327 

424 
472-473 
356-357 

499 
400-401 

378-379 
188-190 

35-40 

384-385 

463 

358-359 

153-172 



493 



Railway Club 

Relay, Two Mile Championship of 

America '. 266 

Review of Baseball Season 246-247 

Review of Basketball Season 275- 

Peview of Class Athletics 296 

Review of Football Season 234-236 

Roast Section 523- 

Sachem 518 

Scabbard and Blade 442-443 

Scarab ." 441 

Scribblers' Club 485 

Second Band 202-203 

Senior and Junior Illinae 467 

Senior Ball Committee 45 

Senior Class Officers 44 

Senior Basketball 300 

Senior Invitation Committee 124 

Senior Memorial Committee 45 

Seniors 41-125 

Senior Girls Basketball 313 

Senior Officers 210 

Senior Section 49-123 

Seniors. Popular 46-48 

Senior Smoker Committee 125 

Senior Swimming Team 302 

Sergeants 211 



653 




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Shomeez 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Chi 

Delta Chi 

Kappa 

\u 

Pi 




Sigma 
Sigma 
Sigma 

Sigma 
Sigma 

Sigma Tau 

Siren 

Social Affairs 

Social Fraternities 

Societies, Honorary and Profes 

siona' 
Sophomore Class Baseba 
Sophomore Class Football 
Sophomore Class Swimming Team 
Sophomore Cotillion 
Sophomore Company. Wiuiyng 
Sophomore Class Basketball 
Sophomore Class Officers 
Sophomore Girls Basketball Team.. 

Si in irities 

Spanish Club 

Students Volunteer Band 
Stunt Show, (iirls 
Swimming, Varsit) 
Swimming Class 

Tau Beta Pi 

Tau Kappa Epsilon 

Technograph 

Tennis 

Theta Delta Chi 



THE 



ILLIO 












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OF THE 1916 ILLIO 



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